July 27 Tokyo 2020 Olympics news and results

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11:33 p.m. ET, July 27, 2021

Katie Ledecky wins women's 1500m freestyle in dominant fashion

America's Katie Ledecky celebrates after winning the gold medal in the 1500m freestyle on July 28.
America's Katie Ledecky celebrates after winning the gold medal in the 1500m freestyle on July 28. (Clive Rose/Getty Images)

American great Katie Ledecky crushed the first-ever women's 1500m freestyle final to win her first gold medal of Tokyo 2020.

Ledecky was the favorite to win the event and she didn't disappoint.

The US swimming star clocked a time of 15:37.34, leading the field for most of the race and finishing more than four seconds ahead of silver medalist, fellow American Erica Sullivan.

German Sarah Kohler finished third, with a time of 15:42.91.

This is Ledecky's sixth Olympic gold medal and her eighth Olympic medal in total.

It's is her second medal of the Tokyo Games, after she earlier won silver in the 400-meter freestyle. Earlier today, however, she failed to make the podium in the 200-meter freestyle.

11:33 p.m. ET, July 27, 2021

Another gold for the hosts as Yui Ohashi wins women's 200m individual medley

Yui Ohashi, of Japan, reacts after winning the 200-meter individual medley on July 28.
Yui Ohashi, of Japan, reacts after winning the 200-meter individual medley on July 28. (Martin Meissner/AP)

Japan's Yui Ohashi has won gold in the women's 200m individual medley, drawing loud cheers in front of her home crowd.

America's Alex Walsh finished second, with Kate Douglass in third.

Ohashi is the second Japanese swimmer to win a medal today in Japan. Tomoru Honda claimed silver in the men's 200m butterfly earlier in the morning.

10:51 p.m. ET, July 27, 2021

Sunisa Lee: "We are WINNERS in our hearts"

American silver medalist Sunisa Lee tweeted Wednesday morning that she has "never been prouder" to be part of a team, just hours after she and the rest of the US women's gymnastics team won the silver medal.

The team's biggest star, Simone Biles, withdrew from the event because of mental health concerns.

Here's what Lee tweeted:

Lee said at a news conference after the competition that the team felt a bevy of emotions after Biles withdrew, but that she was "really proud" of her team's ability to "step up to the plate."

"It's very hard to lose a teammate, especially at the Olympic Games," Lee said. "I was really proud of all of us. We were very stressed, (and) put a lot of pressure on ourselves, but we ended up coming back.

10:45 p.m. ET, July 27, 2021

Fukushima's baseball fans are happy the Games have come, but disappointed not to have fans

From CNN’s George Ramsey, Emiko Jozuka, Blake Essig and Daishi Kusunoki in Fukushima, Japan

Baseball is part of Japan's culture, with fans tuning in every season to cheer on their favorite teams.
Baseball is part of Japan's culture, with fans tuning in every season to cheer on their favorite teams. Daishi Kusunoki/CNN

After a 13-year hiatus, baseball is returning to the Olympics — although no fans will be there to witness it.

Japan goes head-to-head with the Dominican Republic on Wednesday in Fukushima.

Unlike Tokyo, Fukushima prefecture is not currently under a coronavirus state of emergency, but a decision was still made to host the seven games at the Fukushima Azuma Baseball Stadium — six softball and one baseball — without fans present.

That's despite spectators being allowed to attend other sporting events outside the Olympics in the region.

The Red Hopes Fukushima prepare to play a game against a team from Gunma at a stadium in Izumizaki village in Fukushima prefecture.
The Red Hopes Fukushima prepare to play a game against a team from Gunma at a stadium in Izumizaki village in Fukushima prefecture. Daishi Kusunoki/CNN

It's particularly disappointing for the city of Fukushima, where the Olympics was supposed to celebrate the region's recovery from a nuclear disaster more than a decade ago.

"We have genuinely dreamed of people all over the world coming to visit Fukushima, and we expected them to find out the attractiveness of Fukushima," Akinori Iwamura, a former Major League Baseball player and manager of semi-pro baseball side the Red Hopes Fukushima, told CNN.
"Although our towns haven't fully recovered, we wanted to tell everyone how Fukushima has been rebuilt in the last 10 years. It is pretty unfortunate to have no spectators at the games," added Iwamura.

Over in Koriyama city — about an hour drive from Fukushima city — residents said they felt elated by Japan's victory over the US in women's softball on Tuesday.

The Red Hopes Fukushima want to use sport to highlight the recovery of their region.
The Red Hopes Fukushima want to use sport to highlight the recovery of their region. Daishi Kusunoki/CNN

And while fans can’t be in the stands for Wednesday' game, some, like local resident Yuko Aikawa, said they were looking forward to watching on TV.

"Of course, I would've wanted to buy tickets to see the competition at the stadium, but I understand the decision to ban spectators," Aikawa said. "My friends and I have been following all the events on TV."
10:29 p.m. ET, July 27, 2021

There may be no fans, but there's plenty of noise inside the Tokyo Aquatics Centre

From CNN's George Ramsay at the Tokyo Aquatics Centre

Australia swimming coach Dean Boxall celebrates as Ariarne Titmus of Australia sets a new Olympic record to win the gold medal on July 28.
Australia swimming coach Dean Boxall celebrates as Ariarne Titmus of Australia sets a new Olympic record to win the gold medal on July 28. Marko Djurica

There’s a raucous, palpable excitement inside the Tokyo Aquatics Centre, despite the limited number of people in attendance.

While fans are still effectively banned from the stands, there are plenty of fellow Olympic competitors in the building — occupying almost two tiers of seating on one side of the pool.

The loudest cheers so far came for Japan's Tomoru Honda, who took silver in the men’s 200m butterfly final. Other athletes from the host nation, as well as those from Australia and the United States, are getting most of the support. It sounds like someone’s even brought along a kazoo!

10:21 p.m. ET, July 27, 2021

Hungary's Kristof Milak takes gold in the men's 200m butterfly

Hungary's Kristof Milak competes in the final of the 200m butterfly on July 28.
Hungary's Kristof Milak competes in the final of the 200m butterfly on July 28. Attila Kisbenedek/AFP/Getty Images

Hungarian swimmer Kristof Milak won gold and set a new Olympic record in the men's 200m butterfly.

Milak finished with a time of 1:51.25. He holds the world record in the event, clocking in at 1:50.73 in 2019.

Japan's Tomoru Hunda, 19, finished with silver and Italy's Federico Burdisso won bronze.

10:20 p.m. ET, July 27, 2021

Ariarne Titmus sets an Olympic record with her second swimming gold medal

Ariarne Titmus of Team Australia celebrates after competing in the 200m Freestyle Final on July 28.
Ariarne Titmus of Team Australia celebrates after competing in the 200m Freestyle Final on July 28. (Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

Australian swimmer Ariarne Titmus has won her second gold medal in the women's 200m freestyle.

Titmus set a new Olympic record, finishing in 1:53.50

Hong Kong's Siobhan Haughey won silver, setting a new Asian record with a time of 1:53.92. Canada's Penny Oleksiak took bronze.

American star Katie Ledecky placed fifth, but she was not considered a favorite for the event. She will compete later in the 1500m women's freestyle.

7:58 p.m. ET, July 27, 2021

US Olympic official applauds Simone Biles' decision to prioritize "mental wellness over all else"

Sarah Hirshland, CEO of the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee speaks to the media during the USOPC Leadership Conference at Tokyo Big Sight ahead of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games on July 23.
Sarah Hirshland, CEO of the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee speaks to the media during the USOPC Leadership Conference at Tokyo Big Sight ahead of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games on July 23. (Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)

Sarah Hirshland, CEO of the US Olympic and Paralympic Committee, commended Simone Biles' decision to withdraw from the women's team gymnastics final at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics on Tuesday over mental health concerns.

“Simone, you’ve made us so proud. Proud of who you are as a person, teammate and athlete," Hirshland said in a statement.

"We applaud your decision to prioritize your mental wellness over all else, and offer you the full support and resources of our Team USA community as you navigate the journey ahead.”

What we know: Biles withdrew midway through the women's team finals after leaving the field to be attended to. After visiting a trainer, Biles returned to the arena, but did not warm up for uneven bars. Instead, 20-year-old Jordan Chiles took Biles' place.

From the sidelines, Biles supported her teammates — chatting with them and cheering after each routine. Biles was a lively presence, jumping up and down in support of her teammates.

The four-time Olympic gold medalist later explained her decision.

"Whenever you get in a high stress situation, you kind of freak out," the 24-year-old told reporters. "I have to focus on my mental health and not jeopardize my health and well-being."

"It just sucks when you're fighting with your own head," she added.

7:13 p.m. ET, July 27, 2021

These athletes and teams won gold medals at Tuesday's Olympic Games

From CNN's Wayne Sterling

Russia's Liliia Akhaimova, Angelina Melnikova, Viktoriia Listunova and Vladislava Urazova celebrate on the podium after winning the artistic gymnastics women's team final in Tokyo on July 27.
Russia's Liliia Akhaimova, Angelina Melnikova, Viktoriia Listunova and Vladislava Urazova celebrate on the podium after winning the artistic gymnastics women's team final in Tokyo on July 27. Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

Twenty-two gold medals were won. Here's a breakdown of who's taking home the gold:

Artistic Gymnastics

  • Women's Team: Russian Olympic Committee (ROC)

Canoe Slalom

  • Women's Kayak: Ricarda Funk, Germany

Cycling Mountain Bike

  • Women's Cross-country: Jolanda Neff, Switzerland

Diving

  • Women's Synchronised 10m Platform: Chen Yuxi/Zhang Jiaqi, China

Equestrian

  • Dressage Team Grand Prix Special: Germany

Fencing

  • Women's Epee Team: Estonia

Judo

  • Women's -63 kg: Clarisse Agbegnenou, France
  • Men's -81 kg: Takanori Nagase, Japan

Shooting

  • 10m Air Pistol Mixed Team: China
  • 10m Air Rifle Mixed Team: China

Softball

  • Japan

Surfing

  • Men's: Italo Ferreira, Brazil
  • Women's: Carissa Moore, United States

Swimming

  • Men's 200m Freestyle: Tom Dean, Great Britain
  • Women's 100m Backstroke: Kaylee McKeown, Australia
  • Men's 100m Backstroke: Evgeny Rylov, ROC
  • Women's 100m Breaststroke: Lydia Jacoby, United States

Taekwondo

  • Women's +67kg: Milica Mandic, Serbia
  • Men's +80kg: Vladislav Larin, ROC

Triathlon

  • Women's Individual: Flora Duffy, Bermuda

Weightlifting

  • Women's 59kg: Kuo Hsing-Chun, Chinese Taipei
  • Women's 64kg: Maude Charron, Canada