April 14 coronavirus news

By Joshua Berlinger, Adam Renton, Rob Picheta and Meg Wagner, CNN

Updated 9:38 p.m. ET, April 14, 2020
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4:20 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

One third of NHS staff and other key workers tested in UK have coronavirus

From CNN's Simon Cullen

A sign calling for proper personal protective equipment for NHS staff is seen outside a home in Hackney, London on April 13.
A sign calling for proper personal protective equipment for NHS staff is seen outside a home in Hackney, London on April 13. Hollie Adams/Getty Images

One third of National Health Service staff and other key workers who’ve been tested for coronavirus have returned positive results, according to data released by the British government.

According to the figures released Monday, 16,888 people who fall into the category of “key workers and their households” have been tested. So far, 5,733 – or 34% -- are confirmed to have the virus.

The government has been under pressure to ramp up testing for NHS workers and their families, amid concerns about a lack of appropriate personal protective equipment.

Health minister Matt Hancock has previously said that NHS staff who show symptoms -- or live with someone who does -- will be able to get tested under the government’s plan, with the ultimate goal to provide testing to all NHS staff regardless of symptoms.

4:01 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

It's past 10 a.m. in Paris and Madrid. Here's what you need to know if you're just waking up in Europe

A runner cross a bridge in the early morning in Paris on April 14.
A runner cross a bridge in the early morning in Paris on April 14. Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images

Here's the latest on the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Global cases are closing in on 2 million: The novel coronavirus has infected at least 1,921,369 people and killed 119,730 worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins University.
  • Nearly another month of lockdown for India: Prime Minister Narendra Modi has extended a nationwide lockdown until May 3 in a bid to contain the continued spread of the coronavirus, but said that some states which have avoided outbreaks may be allowed to resume "important activities." The "complete" 21-day lockdown for India's 1.3 billion people came into force at the end of the day on March 24 and was set to expire today.
  • Gloomy economic outlook for France: The economy is expected to shrink by 8% this year, French finance minister Bruno Le Maire said. France is extending coronavirus emergency measures until May 11, President Emmanuel Macron said on Monday.
  • Singapore's biggest spike: The Southeast Asian city-state reported 386 new cases on Monday -- all locally transmitted. It's the largest single-day increase since the outbreak began in the country, according to the Ministry of Health.
  • Positive signs in the United States: Though the situation differs from state to state, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the country is "nearing the peak right now." Cases in the US have topped 582,000, including more than 23,000 deaths.
  • New York preparing for what's next: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday that "the worst is over" in his state, but that people need to continue to be smart going forward and practice social distancing. Cuomo said the state is looking at a plan to reopen after the shutdown that is in coordination with other surrounding states.
  • Heated briefing: President Donald Trump lashed out at criticism of his handling of the coronavirus crisis during a grievance-fueled appearance from the White House that featured a propaganda-like video he said was produced by his aides. "Everything we did was right," Trump insisted.
3:43 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

France's finance minister thinks the country's economy will contract by 8% this year

From Pierre Bairin in Paris

French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire speaks with other officials in the minister's office in Paris on April 9.
French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire speaks with other officials in the minister's office in Paris on April 9. Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images

French finance minister Bruno Le Maire said the country's economy is expected to shrink by 8% this year.

"Certain sectors such as hotels and restaurants will not be able to resume from May 11 for reasons of health security; partial unemployment will be prolonged," he said.

The prediction comes on the heels of President Emmanuel Macron's announcement Monday night that France would extended coronavirus emergency measures for another month.

In a live address to the nation, Macron said the strict measures will remain in place and the borders will be closed until May 11. 

3:26 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

Acting US intelligence chief shares Instagram post appearing to mock stay-at-home orders

From CNN's Alex Marquardt and Paul LeBlanc

Acting US Director of National Intelligence Richard Grenell on Monday shared a meme that appeared to mock the enforcement of stay-at-home orders in the US despite the overwhelming consensus of public health officials that such measures are crucial to slowing the coronavirus' spread.

On his Instagram account, Grenell posted the meme that features an image of the US Constitution with the caption "signed permission slip to leave your house."

"Love this!" Grenell captioned the post.

That message directly contradicts recommendations put forth by public health experts and government agencies -- including Grenell's own office.

Read more about the post here:

3:05 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

What you need to know about antibody tests and the coronavirus pandemic

From CNN's Mallory Simon and Gina Yu

Medical firm staff work in a lab on coronavirus serology-based test kits just outside Tehran, Iran on April 11.
Medical firm staff work in a lab on coronavirus serology-based test kits just outside Tehran, Iran on April 11. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP

As the world watches and wonders when coronavirus pandemic stay-at-home orders and social distancing measures might end, some hope antibody tests might help provide a solution.

Antibody tests -- also known as serology tests -- aren't meant to diagnose active infection with the coronavirus. Rather, they check for proteins in the immune system, known as antibodies, through a blood sample.

Their presence means a person was exposed to the virus and developed antibodies against it, which may mean they have at least some immunity -- although experts are not sure how strong the immunity may be or even how long it will last.

In contrast, diagnostic testing, so far, has mostly used a laboratory technique known as a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. These tests can diagnose active infections through a sample -- usually from a nose swab -- that is then tested for viral genetic material.

Read more:

2:44 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

The IMF has approved a debt-relief plan for 25 countries battling the coronavirus pandemic

From CNN's David McKenzie and Maija Ehlinger

An exterior view of the IMF building in Washington seen on March 27, 2020.
An exterior view of the IMF building in Washington seen on March 27, 2020. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The International Monetary Fund will provide immediate debt relief to 25 member countries that have requested financial assistance as they deal with the novel coronavirus pandemic, IMF managing director Kristalina Georgieva said Monday.

The countries receiving the grants are among the IMF's "poorest and most vulnerable members."

They are: Afghanistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of Congo, The Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, São Tomé and Príncipe, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Tajikistan, Togo and Yemen.

The funds will be used "to cover their IMF debt obligations for an initial phase over the next six months and will help them channel more of their scarce financial resources towards vital emergency medical and other relief efforts," Georgieva said.

The IMF trust responsible for the funds can provide $500 million in "grant-based debt service relief." In her statement, Georgieva urged donors "to help us replenish the Trust’s resources and boost further our ability to provide additional debt service relief for a full two years to our poorest member countries.”

2:25 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

China is giving cash to car buyers to revive sales crushed by the pandemic

From CNN Business' Laura He in Hong Kong

Workers assemble cars at the Dongfeng Honda Automobile factory in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province on April 8.
Workers assemble cars at the Dongfeng Honda Automobile factory in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province on April 8. Ng Han Guan/AP

In a normal year, China would have sold more than 6 million new cars by now. This year, the number is closer to 3.7 million, and now the government is handing out cash to help the world's biggest auto market get back on its feet after the coronavirus pandemic.

Car sales declined 42% in the first quarter of 2020 compared to last year, according to data released late last week by the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers.

While that is largely because of a whopping 79% plunge in February -- when the country of 1.4 billion people recorded just 310,000 sales -- the market remains very weak. Only 1.43 million vehicles were sold in China last month, a 43% decline over March 2019.

Crucial economic role: More than 40 million people in China rely on the auto sector for jobs, either directly or indirectly. And the more than $1 trillion in revenue the industry generates each year contributes to nearly 10% of China's manufacturing sector.

A healthy Chinese car market is also important to the rest of the world. Global automakers like Volkswagen and General Motors sell millions of cars in China -- each of those companies, for example, depend on the country for roughly 40% of their total sales.

Read more about China's automobile market:

2:07 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

WWE deemed an essential service, returns to live televised shows

From CNN's Amanda Jackson

Professional sports in Florida are getting the green light to resume production after the Florida Governor's Office deemed them "essential services."

This is being added to the same list that includes services such as grocery stores, hospitals, banks, utility companies and restaurants.

The order that was signed on Thursday states that employees at professional sports and media production with a national audience can continue only if the location is closed to the general public. This essential service was added because it is critical to Florida's economy, officials told CNN.

World Wrestling Entertainment resumed live televised shows on Monday after weeks of taped matches, including their biggest event of the year, WrestleMania. The organization is producing new content for fans with the use of their training facility in Orlando.

"We believe it is now more important than ever to provide people with a diversion from these hard times," WWE said in a statement to CNN. "We are producing content on a closed set with only essential personnel in attendance following appropriate guidelines while taking additional precautions to ensure the health and wellness of our performers and staff."

Read more:

1:48 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

Trump rages at criticism while governors craft their own plans to reopen the economy

Analysis by CNN's Stephen Collinson and Maeve Reston

President Donald Trump speaks during the daily briefing on the novel coronavirus in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 13.
President Donald Trump speaks during the daily briefing on the novel coronavirus in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 13. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

With 23,000 Americans dead and millions without a paycheck, President Donald Trump dimmed the lights in the White House briefing room, fired up a misleading propaganda video and boiled over.

In one of the most unchained presidential tantrums ever captured on television, Trump's Monday display flouted every notion of calm leadership by the commander in chief in a crisis.

He claimed powers never envisioned by the Constitution and insisted his "authority is total" to order states and cities to get moving again to break out of the frozen economy. His warning came as two blocs of Eastern and Western hot-spot states banded together in an implied challenge to his vow to get people back to work soon, setting off a brewing confrontation over the power of the federal government.

During the news conference, Trump moaned that the press was not giving him credit because "everything we did was right" in the coronavirus pandemic.

Raging at reporters, the President used the campaign-style video to mislead the nation about his sluggish recognition of the threat from the virus, after once predicting a "miracle" that would make it go away. He called up his top medical adviser, Dr. Anthony Fauci, to publicly repudiate his own words Sunday on CNN, which had been interpreted as criticism of early administration actions.

When the Category Five presidential storm had blown out, Trump had offered no new guidance on the key issues -- for instance, the continued inadequacy of testing, which will hamper the nation's economic opening. He vowed that the economy would fire up "ahead of schedule" but did not explain how, when many states are at or are approaching their peak infection rates. And he appeared to warn he would try to force open state economies, including shops, schools and restaurants closed by governors and mayors. He did not explain, either, how he would convince the public to get back to normal if people did not feel confident they were safe.

"The President of the United States calls the shots," Trump said.

Read the full analysis here: