April 14 coronavirus news

By Joshua Berlinger, Adam Renton, Rob Picheta and Meg Wagner, CNN

Updated 9:38 p.m. ET, April 14, 2020
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10:18 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

UK coronavirus death toll surpasses 12,000

From CNN's Nada Bashir and Simon Cullen

North West Ambulance Service medical staff stand outside Nightingale Hospital North West in Manchester, England, on April 13.
North West Ambulance Service medical staff stand outside Nightingale Hospital North West in Manchester, England, on April 13. Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

At least 12,107 people have died from coronavirus in the UK’s hospitals, according to the latest figures from the Department of Health and Social Care.

That’s an increase of 778 since the last update. The figures are current as of 5 p.m. local time yesterday.

Remember: It only includes those who died in hospital. These numbers do not include the people who died in nursing homes or elsewhere. 

Other figures released by the UK’s Office of National Statistics on today suggest the true death toll is significantly higher than the Department of Health and Social Care’s tally because there can be a lag in recording some deaths.

The department says at least 93,873 people have tested positive to coronavirus.

10:00 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

Pakistan extends partial lockdown until the end of the month

From CNN's Sophia Saifi in Islamabad

People wait to receive cash under the government's Ehsaas Emergency Cash program for families in need in Karachi, Pakistan, on April 14.
People wait to receive cash under the government's Ehsaas Emergency Cash program for families in need in Karachi, Pakistan, on April 14. Fareed Khan/AP

Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan extended a "partial lockdown" across the country until the end of April.  

In a nationally televised briefing today, Khan called for Pakistanis to stay indoors to ensure that the country continues to flattened the curve. 

To manage the surge of unemployment in the country, the government will reopen the construction sector in phases to ensure employment for daily wage earners in the country.

Domestic and international travel by rail and air will remain closed until the end of the month.

9:44 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

Stocks open higher as earnings season kicks off

From CNN’s Anneken Tappe

US stocks climbed higher at the opening bell as better-than-expected trade data from China lifted investors' hopes that the world's second-largest economy may be starting to bounce back.

Meanwhile, first-quarter earnings season got underway with the big banks reporting. JPMorgan and Wells Fargo both reported substantial losses and shored up their reserves to prevent more pain during the coronavirus recession. But that was widely expected, and their shares climbed 3% and 2%, respectively, at the market open 

  • The Dow kicked off 1.6%, or 385 points, higher.
  • The S&P 500 rose 1.8%.
  • The Nasdaq Composite climbed 1.9%.

 You can follow live updates on the markets here.

9:38 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

Boston University may cancel in-person classes until 2021

Boston University is preparing for the possibility that in-person classes may not resume until 2021.

The university has already cancelled all "in-person summer activities on the Charles River Campus" — and the school's coronavirus recovery plan includes protocols for if it's not safe for students to return to campus in the fall.

Boston University explained it like this in an online statement:

"The Recovery Plan recognizes that if, in the unlikely event that public health officials deem it unsafe to open in the fall of 2020, then the University’s contingency plan envisions the need to consider a later in-person return, perhaps in January 2021."

The University will "offer remote learning courses this summer" and it plans to "continue providing the minimal housing and dining services that are currently available."

9:39 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

The White House is expected to announce another coronavirus task force. Here's what we know so far.

From Nikki Carvajal, Kevin Liptak and Cristina Alesci 

President Donald Trump listens to Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, during a coronavirus task force briefing at the White House on April 3.
President Donald Trump listens to Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, during a coronavirus task force briefing at the White House on April 3. Win McNamee/Getty Images

The White House is expected to announce a new task force – or multiple task forces – to deal with reopening the US economy after coronavirus closures.

Here’s what we know about the possible group so far:

  • As of yesterday, membership had not been finalized: The White House said the composition of the new panel isn't finalized yet. The President has described the task force members as, “The best names in various businesses and professions and religions.”
  • We know one member for sure: It'll be President Trump’s new chief of staff Mark Meadows.
  • There could be governors and business leaders: The President and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin have teased that there will be key figures from the private sector and governor. There's no indication yet on who that would be and it's not a done deal yet.
  • Details are changing: One official tells CNN the details have already changed several times in recent days. No one wants to go out on a limb about the council’s composition until President Trump has given final sign off.
  • It’s increasingly unlikely that CEOs will play a formal role: A source who regularly advises CEOs is casting doubt on the notion that CEOs or business leaders have been asked to join a formal White House task force to reopen the economy.
  • Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump will NOT serve on the task force: President Trump was asked during Monday’s briefing if either of them would serve, and he said no, despite reporting that the President’s daughter would play a role.
  • There could be multiple task forces: “We’re actually calling it a number of committees with the most prominent people in the country, the most successful people in the various fields, and we’ll be announcing them tomorrow,” President Trump said at Monday’s coronavirus task force briefing.
9:17 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

UK economy could shrink 35% in the second quarter because of coronavirus restrictions

From Chris Liakos

A man walks by shuttered businesses, all closed due to Covid-19 restrictions, in Blackpool, England, on April 13.
A man walks by shuttered businesses, all closed due to Covid-19 restrictions, in Blackpool, England, on April 13. Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

The British economy could shrink by 35% in the second quarter if there is three months' worth of restrictions, the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR), UK’s independent public finances watchdog, warned.

The OBR predicted the economy will eventually bounce back, leading to an annual drop in GDP of 13%.

The watchdog said in a report that this is just a potential scenario: “We do not attempt to predict how long the economic lockdown will last – that is a matter for the Government, informed by medical advice,” it said.

A three-month lockdown — followed by another three-month period where movement restrictions are eased — would see unemployment rise by more than 2 million to 10% in the second quarter, OBR said.

The watchdog added the deficit would hit £273 billion in 2020-21 or 14% of GDP, before falling back close to forecast in the medium term. That would be the largest single-year deficit since the Second World War.

9:27 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

Nearly 600 sailors on USS Theodore Roosevelt test positive for coronavirus

From CNN's Ryan Browne

In this photo taken on April 7 and provided by the US Navy, sailors and staff assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt listen as Vice Adm. William Merz, commander of the US 7th Fleet, answers questions during a visit to the ship at Naval Base Guam.
In this photo taken on April 7 and provided by the US Navy, sailors and staff assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt listen as Vice Adm. William Merz, commander of the US 7th Fleet, answers questions during a visit to the ship at Naval Base Guam. Mass Communication Specialist Kaylianna Genier/US Navy/AP

At least 589 sailors aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt have tested positive for Covid-19, according to a US Navy official.

One sailor died earlier this week, and four have been hospitalized.

Some background: The impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the Roosevelt was at the center of a controversy that led to the resignation last week of acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly, who had dismissed the aircraft carrier's captain Brett Crozier after the leak of a memo in which he implored Navy officials to urgently evacuate the ship to protect the health of its sailors.

Crozier also flagged his concerns about challenges of trying to contain the virus aboard the ship and requested that sailors be allowed to quarantine on land.

9:09 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

Wells Fargo's profit is down 89% as it braces for coronavirus turmoil

From CNN’s Matt Egan

People stand outside a Wells Fargo branch in the Atwater Village neighborhood in Los Angeles on April 3.
People stand outside a Wells Fargo branch in the Atwater Village neighborhood in Los Angeles on April 3. Damian Dovarganes/AP

Wells Fargo just announced a deeper-than-expected 89% plunge in first-quarter profit, driven largely by a $3.1 billion reserve build to protect against bad loans.

The reserve build "reflected the expected impact these unprecedented times could have on our customers," Wells Fargo CFO John Shrewsberry said in a statement.

Wells Fargo's provision for credit losses spiked to nearly $4 billion, compared with $845 million the year before.

Here's why: The bank cited "forecasted credit deterioration due to the Covid-19 pandemic."

Revenue dropped 18% to $17.7 billion, also missing estimates.

Wells Fargo reported a 5% jump in period-end loans to $1 trillion. That growth could accelerate this quarter because the Federal Reserve recently removed penalties on Wells Fargo to free the troubled bank to lend to small businesses. Deposits also climbed 4% to $1.4 trillion.

8:53 a.m. ET, April 14, 2020

New York governor says "phased reopening" of the state will take months 

From CNN's Adrienne Vogt

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that easing coronavirus restrictions and opening up more businesses across the state will likely take months. 

“We’re not talking about the next two weeks or three weeks, we're talking about months, we're talking about a phased reopening,” he said in an interview with CNN’s Alisyn Camerota. “It means there is no light switch. 

He continued: "It’s going to be a phased process. We have to bring in testing, so that we’re testing as we're doing this reopening, so that we can gauge whether or not we're increasing the virus spread. We have to start with really what's an expansion of essential services.”

Cuomo said coronavirus cases over the past five days or so seem to have plateaued in the state.  

“Our behavior has stopped the spread of the virus. God did not stop the spread of the virus. And what we do, how we act, will dictate how that virus spreads,” he said.

“We changed the trajectory of the virus by our actions. And that's the real important lesson to me,” he added.

Cuomo again cautioned that easing coronavirus restrictions too soon could have potentially disastrous results.

“I want to get out of the house, trust me. Everybody does. But if you move too quickly and not smartly, you will see the numbers go right back up again and you'll have to do another lockdown,” he said, adding that “the federal government has to be realistic about this. You can't just wish it and then it is so.”

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