October 14 coronavirus news

By Jessie Yeung, Adam Renton and Angela Dewan, CNN

Updated 12:01 a.m. ET, October 15, 2020
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11:15 a.m. ET, October 14, 2020

Wales to ban travelers from coronavirus hotspots in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland 

From CNN’s Zahid Mahmood in London 

Wales will ban travelers from high coronavirus hotspots in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland from entering Wales starting Friday, Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford announced on Wednesday.

In a tweet, Drakeford said he was introducing the ban as there had been “no formal response” from British Prime Minister Boris Johnson after sending him two letters to restrict travel into Wales. 

“I am preparing new regulations to protect the health of people in Wales that will come into force on Friday,” he said.              

Read the tweet:

 

 

11:02 a.m. ET, October 14, 2020

New York City continues to see “leveling off” of Covid-19 cases in hot spots, mayor says

From CNN's Kristina Sgueglia

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said the city continues to see a “leveling off” of Covid-19 cases in the communities most effected. 

“So far the overall picture is steady,” he said, adding he would still like to see more progress in cluster areas. 

“What we’re seeing overall in terms of the city indicators suggests that we are making some progress.”

The mayor said this is a decisive week, adding “we have to stop a second wave from hitting new York city and we have the power to do it.”

The percent of people who tested positive for Covid-19 city wide is at 1.13%, under the 5% threshold, de Blasio said. The seven-day rolling average is 1.46%.

The daily number of people admitted to hospitals for Covid-19 is at 76, under the 200 threshold. The confirmed positivity rate for Covid-19 for those patients is 25.3%

One thing to note: These numbers were released by the citys public health agency, and may not line up exactly in real time with CNN’s database drawn from Johns Hopkins University and the Covid Tracking Project

10:06 a.m. ET, October 14, 2020

Northern Ireland reports record high daily Covid-19 cases

From Amy Cassidy in Glasgow and Peter Taggart in Belfast 

Northern Ireland has reported 1,217 new positive Covid-19 cases in the past 24 hours, a record-high for the nation.

This takes the total number of reported cases to 23,115.

The previous record for daily cases was 1,080 last Friday. 

10:03 a.m. ET, October 14, 2020

Soccer superstar Ronaldo flies to Italy after testing positive for Covid-19

From CNN’s Vasco Cotovio in London

Cristiano Ronaldo warms up before a match between Portugal and Spain at the Jose Alvalade stadium on October 7 in Lisbon, Portugal.
Cristiano Ronaldo warms up before a match between Portugal and Spain at the Jose Alvalade stadium on October 7 in Lisbon, Portugal. Carlos Costa/AFP/Getty Images

Portugal and Juventus soccer superstar Cristiano Ronaldo is on his way to Turin, Italy, aboard a private air ambulance, after testing positive for Covid-19 on Tuesday. 

Reports on Portuguese media showed pictures of Ronaldo boarding the plane at the Cascais Municipal Airport. State news agency Lusa reported that Ronaldo left aboard the jet toward Turin around 1:30 p.m. local time.

9:41 a.m. ET, October 14, 2020

Bangladesh will reopen movie theaters on Friday

From CNN’s Brittany Vickers

Bangladesh will be begin reopening movie theaters on Friday, according to state news agency Bangladesh Sangbad Sangstha (BSS).

New Covid-19 restrictions for the reopening include keeping at least half of the number of seats in the theaters vacant, ensuring proper hygiene and social distancing. 

9:28 a.m. ET, October 14, 2020

Portugal prime minister declares "state of calamity" because of Covid-19

From CNN’s Vasco Cotovio in London

Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Costa talks to the media prior to a meeting in Brussels, Belgium, on October 1.
Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Costa talks to the media prior to a meeting in Brussels, Belgium, on October 1. Thierry Monasse/Getty Images

Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Costa announced the country will enter a "state of calamity" midnight on Wednesday, saying the Covid-19 situation in the country was “serious.”

“We can classify the evolution of the pandemic in Portugal as a serious one,” Costa told journalists as he announced the state of calamity at a press conference, following a cabinet meeting on Wednesday. The declaration gives the government exceptional powers to adopt additional measures to try to curb the spread of the virus. 

Costa said additional restrictions would be imposed immediately, namely limiting the number of gatherings in public, commercial spaces or restaurants to no more than five people. In schools and universities, celebrations and non-academic activities will be forbidden and family events, such as weddings and baptisms, will be limited to a maximum of 50 guests. 

Costa went on to say that authorities would be called upon to increase surveillance and enforcement of these rules in public places, namely restaurants and shops, increasing fines for up to 10,000 euros for businesses who do not enforce the rules. 

“It is necessary to revive the memory that it is really necessary to follow these rules,” Costa said, adding that there had been some relaxation, as time passed. 

Costa also said the government would put forward a bill to make the use of masks in certain outdoor spaces mandatory. The bill would also make it mandatory for the Portuguese to sign up for the Portuguese National Health Service’s track and trace app. 

The Portuguese Prime minister made a point of differentiating the newly declared “state of calamity” from the “state of emergency” the country declared in March, before going into lockdown. He said Government advice on working from home would remain the same, and borders would be kept open. 

9:10 a.m. ET, October 14, 2020

"Herd immunity is another word for mass murder," expert says

From CNN Health’s Naomi Thomas

William Haseltine, Chair and President of ACCESS Health International, said he is " extremely concerned that the President is being advised by people who speak of herd immunity."

“Herd immunity is another word for mass murder. That is exactly what it is," Haseltine said on CNN’s “New Day” on Wednesday.

Haseltine went on to say that if the virus is allowed to spread, as the Trump Administration is allegedly advocating, “we are looking at two to six million Americans dead – not just this year but every year.” 

“This is an unmitigated disaster for our country – to have people at the highest levels of our government countermanding our best public health officials,” Haseltine said. “We know this epidemic can be put under control. Other countries have done it. We are doing the opposite.” 

Some background: A study recently published in The Lancet has shown that less than 10% of the US population has been exposed to Covid-19. In order to essentially create a herd of protection around other people, 60% to 70% of the population would have to become infected, Dr. Sanjay Gupta said later on New Day.

"We know that with around 10% of the country that's become infected, 216,000 people have died, roughly. So, just do the math there," he said.

9:32 a.m. ET, October 14, 2020

New York governor: Covid-19 is "not going away anytime soon"

From CNN's Kristina Sgueglia

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that Covid-19 is not going away any time soon, as he remarked on the state of the virus as colder months and the flu season approach.

“We’re entering a new phase with Covid that we have to understand, because this is not going away any time soon," he said while discussing his new book “American Crisis” on CNN this morning.

He said he thinks “best case scenario, we’re looking at another year…even if everything works out well.”

Transparent social distancing bubble tents are set up for diners outside a restaurant in Manhattan, New York, on October 13.
Transparent social distancing bubble tents are set up for diners outside a restaurant in Manhattan, New York, on October 13. Liao Pan/China News Service/Getty Images

He said while the state’s overall infection rate is one of the lowest in the country, and the globe, what the state is still seeing is “mini clusters” 

“One sweet 16 party created 40 cases, one bar that violated the rules, dozens of cases," he said.

Cuomo said the state needs sophistication in testing and contact tracing to attack that small cluster. The key is to “rush in with resources” to be sure “we stamp it out.” 

8:35 a.m. ET, October 14, 2020

New reports show coronavirus immunity can last for months

From CNN Health’s Maggie Fox

Three new reports just published show coronavirus immunity can last for months, and maybe even longer.

The findings suggest that many, if not most, people who recover from coronavirus infections are protected for at least a period of time. They also suggest that coronavirus vaccines may be able to protect people for more than just a few weeks.

One study found that people produce antibodies against coronavirus that last for at least five to seven months.

“We have one person that is seven months out. We have a handful of people that are five to seven months out,” Deepta Bhattacharya, an immunobiologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, told CNN.

“We conclude that neutralizing antibodies are stably produced for at least 5-7 months after SARS-CoV-2 infection,” his team wrote in a report published in the journal Immunity.

They have been working with county officials to test volunteers in Arizona since April 30, ever since they developed a blood test for coronavirus.

Like many researchers, they found antibodies to the coronavirus spiked immediately following infection and then crashed. But a few cells known as B cells stayed around and kept producing antibodies, whose levels built up again over time.

People who were sicker had a stronger immune response, Bhattacharya said. “The people sampled from the ICU had higher levels of antibodies than people who had milder disease.” He doesn’t yet know what that will mean for long-term immunity.

Two other studies also support the idea of long-lasting immunity. Read here for more.