September 15 coronavirus news

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2:58 p.m. ET, September 15, 2020

More than 195,000 people have died from coronavirus in the US

From CNN's Amanda Watts

There have been at least 6,585,763 cases of coronavirus in the US, and at least 195,275 people have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

The totals include cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases. 

So far on Tuesday, Johns Hopkins has reported 32,111 new cases and 782 reported deaths.

2:57 p.m. ET, September 15, 2020

New York removes six states from Covid-19 travel advisory list

From CNN's Laura Ly

A sign displays a Covid-19 travel advisory in New York City on September 1.
A sign displays a Covid-19 travel advisory in New York City on September 1. Noam Galai/Getty Images

New York state has removed six states from its Covid-19 travel advisory list, according to a statement from Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office on Tuesday.

Travelers from California, Hawaii, Maryland, Minnesota, Nevada and Ohio no longer have to self-quarantine for 14 days upon their arrival to New York, Cuomo’s office said. 

The Northern Mariana Islands have also been removed from the list, while Puerto Rico has been added, the statement said.

"When other states and territories make progress fighting COVID-19, that's good for New York and while I am glad to see areas removed from the travel advisory list, it still remains far too long," Cuomo said. "Make no mistake: We must continue to be New York Tough and stay smart. Wearing masks, social distancing and hand washing is what tamed this beast in New York and we must keep it up."
2:31 p.m. ET, September 15, 2020

The World Series will be played at a neutral site due to health concerns

From CNN's David Close

Globe Life Field in Arlington, Texas, will host the 116th World Series this October. 
Globe Life Field in Arlington, Texas, will host the 116th World Series this October.  Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Major League Baseball announced on Tuesday that the home of the Texas Rangers, Globe Life Field in Arlington, Texas, will host the 116th World Series this October. 

It will be the first neutral site World Series since the 1940s. 

MLB’s 2020 postseason plan includes hosting games at four neutral site stadiums in California and Texas starting with the Division Series. 

The league made the historical change “due to health, safety and competitive considerations.”

2:05 p.m. ET, September 15, 2020

New York revises nursing home visitation guidelines

From CNN's Kristina Sgueglia

Nursing homes in New York can resume limited visitations for facilities that have not have a Covid-19 case for at least 14 days as of Thursday, the New York State Health Department said.

This is an update to previous guidelines that asked for a 28-day window before eligibility. 

According to the New York State Department of Health, this guidance would allow eligible visitation in approximately 500 of the states 613 nursing homes. 

The guidelines also require visitors to present a negative test result within seven days. 

Officials said the number of visitors to a nursing home must not exceed 10% of the resident census at any time, adding that only two visitors will be allowed per resident at any one time.

2:15 p.m. ET, September 15, 2020

University of Arizona is urging students to shelter in place until the end of the month 

From CNN's Elizabeth Hartfield

Students pass in front of a sign that reads "Mask Or Face Covering Required To Enter" at the University of Arizona in Tucson on August 24.
Students pass in front of a sign that reads "Mask Or Face Covering Required To Enter" at the University of Arizona in Tucson on August 24. Cheney Orr/Bloomberg/Getty Images

The University of Arizona has issued a recommendation, in accordance with the local county health department, strongly urging students to shelter in place until Sept. 30, the university announced, following a large number of positive Covid-19 cases.

Exceptions include obtaining food, attending work, seeking medical treatment and going outside where social distancing is possible. 

The school is also limiting in person instruction to “essential courses” only until Sept. 27. 

The University of Arizona recorded 261 positive Covid-19 tests on Monday, according to the school’s coronavirus dashboard, and has seen roughly 1,400 cases total since July 31.

 

2:04 p.m. ET, September 15, 2020

"Proving that a vaccine works is easier than proving that it's safe," former CDC director says

From CNN Health’s Lauren Mascarenhas

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden testifies during a House subcommittee hearing on Covid-19 in Washington, DC, in May.
US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden testifies during a House subcommittee hearing on Covid-19 in Washington, DC, in May. Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Proving that a vaccine works is easier than proving that it’s safe,” former US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden said Tuesday.

During an event hosted by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, Frieden said he has two safety concerns regarding a potential Covid-19 vaccine.

“First are the Kawasaki-like syndrome and illnesses that we've seen in children, and possibly similar illnesses in adults,” Frieden said. “That is an immune reaction, and therefore there's a theoretical chance that some vaccines could create that kind of reaction.”

Frieden, who is currently president and CEO of the global health initiative Resolve to Save Lives, emphasized that he is not predicting this will happen, but suggesting that we do due diligence in watching out for it.

“The second concern is sometimes called antibody-dependent enhancement,” Frieden said. “This has been seen in some old vaccines, half a century ago, but it also was seen in an animal model of one SARS vaccine.”

“The risk there would be some people – after vaccination, if they then became infected with Covid – could get sicker then they would have otherwise,” he explained.

Frieden said that we likely will not know everything we need to about vaccines until they are given to thousands, or maybe even millions of people.

“But we need to track safety at every step of the way and be completely open with the public about it,” he said.

1:34 p.m. ET, September 15, 2020

New York governor says he will not ban trick-or-treaters on Halloween

From CNN's Kristina Sgueglia

Children go trick-or-treating in New York City in 2019. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Tuesday he would not ban trick-or-treaters on Halloween amid the pandemic.
Children go trick-or-treating in New York City in 2019. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Tuesday he would not ban trick-or-treaters on Halloween amid the pandemic. Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Tuesday he will not ban trick-or-treaters on Halloween amid the pandemic.

Speaking on CNN affiliate News 12 Long Island, Cuomo said he didn’t think it was appropriate, according to his office. 

“I would not ban trick-or-treaters going door to door. I don't think that's appropriate. You have neighbors — if you want to go knock on your neighbor's door, God bless you and I'm not going to tell you not to. If you want to go for a walk with your child through the neighborhood, I'm not gonna tell you you can't take your child to the neighborhood, I'm not going to do that — I'll give you my advice and guidance and then you will make a decision what you do that night,” Cuomo said, according to his office. 

1:23 p.m. ET, September 15, 2020

Bill Gates says he thinks US will come around to funding Covid-19 vaccines for poor countries

From CNN’s Naomi Thomas

Bill Gates looks on during the New York Times Dealbook event in New York City in 2019.
Bill Gates looks on during the New York Times Dealbook event in New York City in 2019. Mike Cohen/Getty Images for The New York Times

In an interview with the New York Times, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation co-chair Bill Gates described optimism that the United States would ultimately help provide Covid-19 vaccines for poor countries around the world.

“It’s my disposition,” Gates said in the interview, published Monday. “Plus, I’ve got to call these people up and make the pitch to them that this really makes sense – and I totally, totally believe it makes sense.” 

The Times said Gates was referring to leaders in the White House and Congress, who he has lobbied for $4 billion for Covid-19 vaccines for poorer countries.

“As they say,” Gates said, “the US government – after it’s tried every other thing – does the right thing.”   

The Goalkeepers Report from the Gates Foundation, which published Monday, showed that a large number of deaths could be prevented if Covid-19 vaccines were distributed to all countries based on their populations, rather than to rich countries first. But Gates acknowledged that this will not be soon. 

Gates said it “looks selfish” that the US avoided joining global Covid-19 vaccine development efforts and focused on deals with vaccine companies that ensure millions of doses are allocated to the United States, but he did not feel it was unjustified. 

“You’re not going to succeed in getting the US to treat itself as just a random 5% of the world’s population,” Gates said, noting that American taxpayers have covered much of the costs for clinical trials and vaccine manufacturing.

Gates told the Times he expected by next year, regardless of who wins the election, the US would come around to paying much of the estimated $4 billion needed to get Covid-19 vaccines to others around the world. Congress has repeatedly kept funds for AIDS, malaria and childhood vaccinations in the foreign aid budget, Gates said, despite attempts to slash them; with the idea that no country is safe from Covid-19 until every country is, “there’s a better global argument for generosity on this one than there is for H.I.V. or malaria,” he said. 

 

12:59 p.m. ET, September 15, 2020

Entire Irish cabinet self-isolating and parliament suspended

From CNN's Hilary McGann

Seán Ó Fearghaíl, the speaker of the Dáil in Ireland, has announced that all Irish cabinet members are now self-isolating.

The Dáil, the Irish lower house, is also suspended until at least next Tuesday.