September 3 coronavirus news

By Jessie Yeung, Adam Renton, Amy Woodyatt, Meg Wagner and Melissa Macaya, CNN

Updated 12:07 a.m. ET, September 4, 2020
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5:52 p.m. ET, September 3, 2020

Fauci discusses how college campuses can safely open during the pandemic 

From CNN’s Annie Grayer

Kevin Dietsch/Pool/AP/FILE
Kevin Dietsch/Pool/AP/FILE

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious diseases, laid out how colleges and universities should successfully open, and the conditions that he feels would be necessary for sending his own children onto a college campus, in a phone interview with CNN.

As the fall semester begins at colleges across the country with mixed results, Fauci said that colleges and universities should only consider reopening if they can test all of their students at the start of the semester, conduct surveillance testing at various intervals, and have spaces dedicated for students who inevitably contract Covid-19 to quarantine. 

“They got to have the capability of doing the testing to begin with. They got to have the capability of doing surveillance testing, as you get into the school year, and they have to have a plan of how they handle the inevitability of some students who are going to wind up getting affected” Fauci said.

Fauci specifically highlighted the planning around designating specific spaces for students who contract the virus as key to the whole equation.

“The whole thing could fall apart if you don't handle that well” Fauci said. “In other words you could intend to bring people back to person to person learning on a college campus and then if you don't have a good preparation, or a plan of what to do with them if and when they do get infected and likely it's very likely that some students will get infected.”

Fauci said the schools that have followed this game plan “are the ones that have succeeded thus far.” 

More details: Without revealing who, Fauci said that he has consulted with presidents of schools that ultimately decided not to open for in-person instruction this fall, largely because they could not carry out the protocol he deemed as necessary. 

For campuses that have opened, Fauci said that large student parties and social gatherings that violate an institution’s social distancing guidelines are a driving factor in increasing the case counts of their universities.

“I think that's pretty clear. I mean they haven't done the official study to prove that, but the circumstantial evidence is pretty compelling, that when you get students that then congregate without masks in a party setting, particularly if the party is indoors in a sorority or a fraternity, you know that's a recipe for having an outbreak” Fauci said.

5:41 p.m. ET, September 3, 2020

A total of 6 Paris Saint-Germain soccer players have tested positive for Covid-19

 Neymar of PSG looks on during the PSG Training Session ahead of the UEFA Champions League Quarter Final match on August 11, 2020 in Lisbon, Portugal.
Neymar of PSG looks on during the PSG Training Session ahead of the UEFA Champions League Quarter Final match on August 11, 2020 in Lisbon, Portugal. David Ramos/Getty Images/FILE

French professional football club Paris Saint-Germain has announced that an additional three players have tested positive for Covid-19.

On Wednesday, Neymar was one of three PSG players to have tested positive for the virus, according to multiple reports.

On Thursday, PSG said test results revealed the additional players but the team did not disclose names.

"The latest tests for PCR SarsCoV2 carried out on the Paris Saint-Germain first team confirmed three new positive cases. The players are following the appropriate health measures," the statement said.
5:08 p.m. ET, September 3, 2020

Lawmakers urge CDC to encourage tobacco bans, including e-cigarettes, on college campuses

From CNN's Jacqueline Howard

Shutterstock
Shutterstock

In a letter to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, some lawmakers are urging the agency to update its Covid-19 guidance for college and university campuses in order to encourage them to become tobacco free – which would include e-cigarettes – for the fall semester.

This request to the CDC is based on "new evidence demonstrating the link between adolescent tobacco use and COVID-19," Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform's Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy, and Senate Democratic Whip Dick Durbin wrote in the letter, sent to CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield on Thursday.

The letter references a study, led by researchers at Stanford University and published in the Journal of Adolescent Health in August, that suggests young people who have used e-cigarettes can be five times more likely to be diagnosed with Covid-19.

"Following the Stanford study, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) announced that it was banning tobacco use on campus in the fall, including smoking, vaping, and chewing tobacco. In making that decision, UNLV took into account that if someone is smoking, vaping, or chewing tobacco, they cannot be complying with requirements to wear a mask," Krishanmoorthi and Durbin wrote in the letter. 

In the letter, the lawmakers ask for Redfield to confirm by Sept. 9 whether the CDC will make this update to its guidance.

4:39 p.m. ET, September 3, 2020

Dow and Nasdaq plummet in the worst day since June

From CNN's Anneken Tappe

Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images
Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images

The Nasdaq Composite tumbled nearly 5% and the Dow fell more than 800 points, as investors made a dash for the exits following a streak of record-setting days over the past several weeks.

It was the worst day for stocks since June.

Stocks erased all their gains after a huge bout of exuberance Wednesday, when the S&P 500 — the broadest measure of Wall Street — and the Nasdaq hit yet another record high. The Nasdaq had also climbed above 12,000 points for the first time in history Wednesday.

But it didn't stick. Thursday was the Nasdaq's largest one-day decline from a record high in its history, according to Bespoke Investment Group.

All three major indexes finished the day sharply lower. The Nasdaq closed down nearly 5%, and the S&P fell 3.5%, while the Dow finished 2.8%, or 808 points, lower. 

So, what happened? For one, the Nasdaq has been outperforming the other two major stock indexes — the Dow and the S&P 500 — for months. The rally has been going on for long enough that investors are now taking profit.

Even so, the Nasdaq remains up nearly 28% in 2020, still far outpacing its counterparts. The Dow, which only recently turned positive for the year, is back in the red.

But there are also technical reasons for Thursday's decline: As US-China relations sour, investors are moving money out of tech, which could get hit the hardest from a potential increase in tariffs.

The Big Tech companies such as Amazon, Google and Microsoft, all of which are part of the Nasdaq, have become the safe-haven investment of the summer. But investors have beginning to wonder when the rally will run out of steam, either because of increased regulation or because the economy as a whole picks up enough to void the need for safety picks altogether. Tech stocks were among Thursday's worst performers.

But even investors who are still faithful to their safe tech holdings have reason to be a little concerned: Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious diseases, told CNN Thursday that a Covid-19 vaccine by October remained "unlikely," though it was possible.

Making matters worse, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said late Wednesday that "the cooperative spirit we had in March and April" on Capitol Hill has "dissipated as we move closer and closer to the election."

This doesn't bode well for Congress agreeing on another stimulus bill, which the market has been hoping for.

2:45 p.m. ET, September 3, 2020

Iraq records highest daily Covid-19 case increase

From CNN's Mohammed Tawfeeq and Aqeel Najim

A health worker conducts a COVID-19 test with a sample of blood at a health center in Baghdad, Iraq, on August 27.
A health worker conducts a COVID-19 test with a sample of blood at a health center in Baghdad, Iraq, on August 27. Khalil Dawood/Xinhua/Getty Images

Iraq reported 4,755 new cases of Covid-19 in the past 24 hours, which is the highest daily number of infections recorded since the beginning of the pandemic, the country's health ministry said.

The latest recorded cases bring the country's total case count to at least 247,039. There were also 74 new deaths recorded in the last 24 hours, raising the national death toll to 7,275, the ministry said.

Some context: The Iraqi Health Ministry earlier this month warned of "disastrous consequences" if people don't follow the ministry's guidance to contain the spread of the virus.

The guidance included recommendations to stay home, social distance, wear masks and wash hands regularly.

2:42 p.m. ET, September 3, 2020

There have been more than 6,125,000 coronavirus cases in US

From CNN's Amanda Watts

Faculty members from Washington State University Health Sciences Spokane administer COVID-19 tests to students at a mobile testing site on campus, Wednesday, September 2, in Pullman, Washington.
Faculty members from Washington State University Health Sciences Spokane administer COVID-19 tests to students at a mobile testing site on campus, Wednesday, September 2, in Pullman, Washington. Geoff Crimmins/The Moscow-Pullman Daily News/AP

According to Johns Hopkins University's tally of cases in the United States, there have been at least 6,125,916 cases of coronavirus reported in the US. At least 186,185 people have died in the US since the pandemic began. 

So far on Thursday, Johns Hopkins has reported 12,406 new cases and 465 reported deaths.

You can track the number of cases in the US here.

1:50 p.m. ET, September 3, 2020

People obeyed stay-at-home orders, CDC cellphone data shows

From CNN Health's Jacqueline Howard

Close-up of hand of a man holding a smartphone displaying an emergency public safety alert text message ordering residents of Contra Costa County, in San Ramon, California into a lockdown and shelter in place during an outbreak of the COVID-19 coronavirus, March 16.
Close-up of hand of a man holding a smartphone displaying an emergency public safety alert text message ordering residents of Contra Costa County, in San Ramon, California into a lockdown and shelter in place during an outbreak of the COVID-19 coronavirus, March 16. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images/FILE

Stay-at-home orders issued across the United States in the spring appeared to work at keeping people home, new cellphone data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows.

"Based on location data from mobile devices, in 97.6% of counties with mandatory stay-at-home orders issued by states or territories, these orders were associated with decreased median population movement after the order start date," the researchers wrote in the study.

The researchers also found that in areas where orders were lifted or expired, movement "significantly increased" immediately afterward.

“Reduced population movement helps prevent close contact among persons outside the household, potentially limiting exposure to persons infected with SARS-CoV-2,” the researchers from the CDC and the Georgia Tech Research Institute wrote in the CDC’s weekly report.

The study included data on stay-at-home orders issued by states, the District of Columbia and five US territories between March 1 and May 31.

The researchers, from the CDC and the Georgia Tech Research Institute, examined those orders and analyzed anonymous location data from mobile devices. They used the location data to estimate movements by county, based on the percentage of devices that moved each day beyond 150 meters of its most common nighttime location, which the researchers assumed was the home.

Some people could have more than one mobile device, the researchers noted. Plus media attention around Covid-19 and the cancellation of events could also have influenced people to stay home.

"These findings can inform future public policies to reduce community spread of COVID-19,” the researchers wrote.

 

1:09 p.m. ET, September 3, 2020

New prescriptions for hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine surged in March and April, research shows

From CNN's Naomi Thomas

A Salvadoran Health Ministry worker shows a package of bottles of HydroxyChloroquine pills to be distributed in hospitals in San Salvador on April 21 amid the coronavirus outbreak.
A Salvadoran Health Ministry worker shows a package of bottles of HydroxyChloroquine pills to be distributed in hospitals in San Salvador on April 21 amid the coronavirus outbreak. Yuri Cortez/AFP/Get

The number of US prescriptions for hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine were significantly higher in March and April than in the same period in 2019, and the providers prescribing them were different, according to new research published in the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report on Thursday. 

The drugs are typically used to treat autoimmune diseases and to prevent malaria, but early in the pandemic, were touted by President Trump and others as a possible Covid-19 treatment. On March 20, the US Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency use authorization for the drugs to treat Covid-19. The EUA was rescinded on June 15.

To identify differences in prescriptions for these drugs, researchers looked at prescriptions dispensed through US outpatient retail pharmacies from January to June 2019 and 2020. “The overall estimated number of hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine prescriptions dispensed in March and April 2020 increased from 819,906 in 2019 to 1,312,859 in 2020,” said the authors. 

New prescriptions — defined as those dispensed to a patient without a history of prescription for the medications in the last 12 months — went from 30,737 in March 2019 to 222,382 in March 2020, and from 31,748 in April 2019 to 106,184 in April 2020.

The prescribers of the drugs also changed. New prescriptions by specialists who didn’t typically prescribe these medications increased from 1,143 in February 2020 to 75,569 in March 2020 — an 80-fold increase from March 2019. In March and April 2020, 54% of new prescriptions were written by primary care prescribers.

There was a 16-fold increase in new hydroxychloroquine prescriptions for adult men, which the authors said was notable because historically, women are more likely to be receive those prescriptions.

By May and June of 2020, the numbers of new prescriptions and those from non-routine prescribers were declining and approaching 2019 numbers, the authors wrote.

“These declines might have been influenced by publication of additional studies indicating that the medications were not found to be effective for treatment of COVID-19 and by FDA safety warning,” the researchers wrote.

“If prescribing or prescribed these drugs, providers and patients should be familiar with the potential for drug interactions and adverse events associated with hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine use,” the authors wrote.

12:43 p.m. ET, September 3, 2020

Delaware extends state of emergency due to Covid-19

From CNN's Chuck Johnston

Delaware Gov. John Carney announced the extension of the state of emergency declaration in the state to combat the spread of Covid-19 and urged residents to "stay vigilant" during Labor Day weekend.

“Delawareans have made real sacrifices to flatten the COVID-19 curve, and keep their families, friends and neighbors healthy. But if we hope to get more children in school, and more Delawareans back to work, we need to stay vigilant, especially this Labor Day weekend. Wear a face covering and avoid large gatherings. Wash or sanitize your hands frequently. Keep your distance from others outside your household. We’re beating COVID-19, but this fight isn’t over," Carney said in a statement