August 27 coronavirus news

64 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
11:22 p.m. ET, August 27, 2020

Mexico reports more than 6,000 new Covid-19 cases

From journalist Karol Suarez in Mexico City 

A health worker collects swab samples for Covid-19 testing on August 26, in Mexico City.
A health worker collects swab samples for Covid-19 testing on August 26, in Mexico City. Gerardo Vieyra/NurPhoto via AP

Mexico recorded 6,026 new Covid-19 infections on Wednesday, taking the total number of cases confirmed in the country to 579,914. 

The Health Ministry also recorded 518 new fatalities, bringing Mexico's coronavirus death toll to 62,594. 

Mexico has reported the third-highest number of deaths in the world from the virus, behind only the United States and Brazil, according to Johns Hopkins University (JHU)

In Latin America, only Brazil and Peru have recorded more Covid-19 cases than Mexico, JHU data shows.

10:43 p.m. ET, August 27, 2020

Latin America surpasses 7 million Covid-19 cases

From CNN's Hande Atay Alam in Atlanta

Cases of novel coronavirus in Latin America topped 7 million on Thursday, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University's Coronavirus Resource Center and CNN calculations. 

The current number of known Covid-19 cases confirmed in the region is now 7,020,744.

Brazil has reported the highest number of infections in Latin America with 3,761,391. The country has identified the second-highest number of confirmed cases in the world after the United States. 

Countries following Brazil with the highest number of Covid-19 cases in Latin America are Peru, Mexico, Colombia, and Chile.

CNN is tracking worldwide coronavirus cases there:

10:22 p.m. ET, August 27, 2020

CDC forecast now projects more than 200,000 US coronavirus deaths by September 19

From CNN Health’s Jamie Gumbrecht

An ensemble forecast published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now projects more than 200,000 coronavirus deaths in the US by September 19.

The new projections, published Thursday, forecast 200,292 deaths by September 19, with a possible range of 195,824 to 207,269 deaths.

“State- and territory-level ensemble forecasts predict that the number of reported new deaths per week may decrease in 18 jurisdictions. Trends in numbers of future reported deaths are uncertain or predicted to remain stable in the other jurisdictions,” the CDC says on its forecasting website.

Unlike some individual models, the CDC’s ensemble forecast only offers projections about a month into the future. The previous ensemble forecast, published August 20, projected roughly 195,000 coronavirus deaths by September 12.

At least 180,590 people have already died from Covid-19 in the US, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

CNN is tracking US Covid-19 cases and deaths here:

9:48 p.m. ET, August 27, 2020

Cuba's capital city imposes a curfew as coronavirus cases surge again 

From CNN's Patrick Oppmann in Havana

A pedestrian wearing a face mask amid the coronavirus pandemic uses a parasol in Havana, Cuba, on Monday, August 10.
A pedestrian wearing a face mask amid the coronavirus pandemic uses a parasol in Havana, Cuba, on Monday, August 10. Ismael Francisco/AP

For the first time since the coronavirus pandemic hit Cuba, Havana residents will be subjected to a nightly curfew and not be allowed to travel to other provinces in the country, Havana Governor Reinaldo Garcia Zapata announced Thursday.

Cuba’s ruling Communist Party has struggled to control a second wave of Covid-19 in Havana, just weeks after declaring the country was closing in on the tail end of the pandemic.

The curfew from 7 p.m. until 5 a.m. will begin on September 1 and last for at least 15 days, Zapata said.

Zapata said penalties for people not wearing a mask would be increased and the consumption of alcohol in public would be banned.

Cuba, with a population of 11 million, has so far registered 3,806 coronavirus cases and 92 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

7:29 p.m. ET, August 27, 2020

New Mexico governor issues new public health order relaxing certain occupancy restrictions

From CNN’s Jennifer Henderson

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham gives her weekly update on Covid-19 and the state's effort to contain it during a virtual news conference from the state Capitol in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on Thursday, July 23.
New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham gives her weekly update on Covid-19 and the state's effort to contain it during a virtual news conference from the state Capitol in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on Thursday, July 23. Eddie Moore/The Albuquerque Journal/AP

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham issued a new public health order effective Saturday that will relax certain occupancy restrictions, she announced today.

In accordance with Covid-Safe Practices, houses of worship may operate at 40% capacity up from 25% in enclosed buildings and can still have services outside or use audiovisual aids, the order said. 

Food and drink establishments, in accordance with Covid-Safe Practices, can operate indoor dining service at 25% capacity. All tables, indoors or outdoors, can have no more than six people and must be at least six feet apart. 

Mass gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited. The order will remain in effect through Sept. 18.

7:12 p.m. ET, August 27, 2020

8 Nebraska Huskers football players sue the Big Ten over canceled season

From CNN's Jill Martin

Eight players from the University of Nebraska football team are suing the Big Ten Conference, requesting an order to invalidate the Big Ten’s decision to not play football this fall because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The 13-page lawsuit was filed Thursday in Lancaster County District Court in Nebraska.

The plaintiffs in the suit are Nebraska football players Garrett Snodgrass, Garrett Nelson, Ethan Piper, Noa Pola Gates, Alante Brown, Brant Banks, Brig Banks and Jackson Hannah. They are seeking damages of less than $75,000 and for the fall season to be restored, the lawsuit says.

While Big Ten commissioner Kevin Warren previously has said that the vote by the Big Ten Council of Presidents and Chancellors was “overwhelmingly in support of postponing fall sports and will not be revisited,” the lawsuit says that the council did not vote on whether to cancel the fall football season.

The lawsuit references University of Minnesota president Joan Gabel and Michigan State University president Samuel Stanley, Jr. as being quoted that the council did not vote on the decision to cancel or postpone the 2020 fall football season.

The lawsuit says this “a case in which a powerful collegiate athletic conference contends that its student athletes have no rights.”

“Even though its decision significantly and directly affects the rights and opportunities of student athletes at its member institutions, the Big Ten has rejected calls for transparency and refuses to provide documents supporting its claim that a vote was taken or that a proper process was followed,” the lawsuit states. “As a result of the failure of process, the Student Athlete Plaintiffs have been irreparably harmed.”

CNN has reached out to the Big Ten for comment on the lawsuit.

6:54 p.m. ET, August 27, 2020

Connecticut governor announces new nursing home visitation order

From CNN's Mirna Alsharif

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont announced a new order Thursday regarding visitation to nursing homes.

Under the order, facilities that are Covid-19 free for 14 days will have to create their own visitation plans for each resident based on their needs, said Department of Public Health Commissioner Deidre Gifford.

This order clarifies that visits can take place more than once a week, extends socially distanced visits to a minimum time of 30 minutes — previously 20 — and requires facilities to allow visitation at least five days per week, one of which needs to fall over the weekend. Indoor compassionate care visits where people can visit loved ones nearing the end of their lives or whose conditions have deteriorated due to social isolation will also be allowed, said Gifford.

This order only applies to facilities that haven't had Covid-19 cases for 14 days.

Visitors will be required to wear personal protective equipment during visits, but social distancing isn't necessarily required for passionate care visits, Gifford said.

 

6:44 p.m. ET, August 27, 2020

Brazil records more than 44,000 new Covid-19 cases

From Marcia Reverdosa

Soldiers spray disinfectant at the Municipal Market in the Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on August 18.
Soldiers spray disinfectant at the Municipal Market in the Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on August 18. Douglas MAgno/AFP/Getty Images

Brazil reported 44,235 new coronavirus cases and 984 deaths in the last 24 hours, its health ministry said on Thursday.

The country has recorded more than 3.76 million Covid-19 cases with a total of 118,649 deaths so far, according to the ministry. 

Brazil continues to be second only to the United States in the highest total number of coronavirus cases and deaths globally. 

6:47 p.m. ET, August 27, 2020

Schools in Maryland can begin to safely reopen for in-person learning, governor says

From CNN's Gisela Crespo

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan announces that all of the state's school systems meet safety standards to reopen for some in-person instruction during a news conference on August 27 in Annapolis, Maryland.
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan announces that all of the state's school systems meet safety standards to reopen for some in-person instruction during a news conference on August 27 in Annapolis, Maryland. Brian Witte/AP

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on Thursday announced he will authorize all counties in the state to safely begin reopening schools for in-person learning.

"It is essential that we all work together on flexible, hybrid plans to safely get some of our kids back into classrooms and into health and supportive learning environments. Today, I am announcing that as a result of our improved health metrics, every single county school system in the state of Maryland is now fully authorized to begin safely reopening," Hogan said during a news briefing. 

Hogan said the majority of Maryland's school counties have developed plans that include returning children to the schools for "some form of in-person instruction" in the fall, including for children with special needs. 

Hogan said that "of course, the authority and decision making on those safe reopenings continues to rest with those county boards of education" but their decisions need to be based on statewide metrics.

Under the new guidelines, jurisdictions that are both at or below 5% positivity rate and five new cases per 100,000 population over a seven-day average should be able to hold in-person instruction, said Dr. Jinlene Chan, acting deputy secretary at the Maryland Department of Health.

The latest numbers: Hogan said Maryland's Covid-19 positivity rate has been under 5% for 63 consecutive days since June 25, and below 4% for since Aug. 8. 

"We have seen dramatic improvements in the positivity rates of every single one of our most populous jurisdictions in the state. And last week for the first time, the Covid-19 positivity rate for all 24 jurisdictions in Maryland fell below the 5% milestone. Seventeen of our 24 jurisdictions now have positivity rates below 3.5%," Hogan said.