August 7 coronavirus news

36 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
9:11 a.m. ET, August 7, 2020

New York governor expected to announce plans for schools today

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing at the Office of the Governor of the State of New York on July 23 in New York.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing at the Office of the Governor of the State of New York on July 23 in New York. Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

Governor Andrew Cuomo is expected to announce his decision today on whether or not New York state schools can reopen this fall. 

It will include New York City school district, which is the largest public school district in the country with more than 1.1 million students.

Some background: Last month, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said schools will reopen in the fall.

However, ultimately, the decision will be made by the state as to whether schools will open in the fall.

It is state law that governs the opening and closing of schools during the pandemic, not local government, Cuomo's communications director Dani Lever said in a statement.

9:06 a.m. ET, August 7, 2020

How the US plans to use celebrities in coronavirus PSAs

From CNN's Elizabeth Cohen and Dana Vigue

Dr. Anthony Fauci listens during a House Subcommittee hearing about the coronavirus on Friday, July 31, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Dr. Anthony Fauci listens during a House Subcommittee hearing about the coronavirus on Friday, July 31, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kevin Dietsch/Pool/AP

New government public service announcements will use conversations between public health experts and actors, musicians and athletes to educate people about Covid-19.

Michael Caputo, assistant secretary for public affairs at the US Department of Health and Human Services, wouldn’t release the names of the celebrities who will be featured in the new PSAs. 

He said there will be several government health experts involved, including Dr. Anthony Fauci and US Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams.

Messages will be tailored to specific cities and communities. Here's how Caputo described the ads:

“Maybe a football player in Houston will sit down and talk about Houston’s problems with Dr. Fauci ... Or the surgeon general will be sitting on the Capitol Hill steps. We’ll have two cameras, one on him and one over his shoulder. He’ll be eating a sandwich. His iPad rings. He puts the sandwich down and he picks it up. And that rapper or football player or celebrity or rock and roll star or whoever it is will have two cameras on them in Atlanta, and they’ll ask Dr. Adams questions about Covid-19.”

The conversations will be 45 minutes to an hour long, and they will not be scripted. Several minute-long PSAs will be cut from each conversation and will be placed on radio, TV, online platforms and digital billboards. 

“They will be conversations between trusted figures and trusted scientists,” Caputo said.

The topics will be varied and include prevention measures such as wearing masks, washing hands and social distancing.

The other public health experts featured in the PSAs will be...

  • Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Dr. Stephen Hahn, commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration
  • Alex Azar, secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services
  • Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
  • Rear Admiral Dr. Erica Schwartz, deputy surgeon general
  • Rear Admiral Michael Weahkee, director of the Indian Health Service

“There will be no politicians. Zero politicians,” Caputo said.

9:16 a.m. ET, August 7, 2020

US economy added 1.8 million jobs in July — but it's still down nearly 13 million during the pandemic 

From CNN's Anneken Tappe

Job seekers exercise social distancing as they wait to be called into the Heartland Workforce Solutions office in Omaha, Nebraska, on Wednesday, July 15.
Job seekers exercise social distancing as they wait to be called into the Heartland Workforce Solutions office in Omaha, Nebraska, on Wednesday, July 15. Nati Harnik/AP

The US economy added another 1.8 million jobs in July, a sharp slowdown from June and a small step for an economy that's still down 12.9 million jobs during the pandemic.

It was the third-straight month of improvement after the spring lockdown to stem the spread of the disease decimated the labor market. But the economy added far fewer than the 4.8 million jobs added in June.

The unemployment rate fell to 10.2%, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday, but remains above the Great Recession high of 10% that it reached in October 2009.

Hear more:

8:43 a.m. ET, August 7, 2020

Baltimore health chief says she wouldn't eat indoors as city restaurants reopen

From CNN's Adrienne Vogt

Restaurants in Baltimore will be allowed to reopen at 5 p.m. ET today, with indoor dining limited to 25%, despite White House coronavirus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx naming the Maryland city as an area of concern.  

Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Letitia Dzirasa said she herself wouldn’t advise going out to eat indoors at a restaurant, instead encouraging residents to eat outside or order takeout. 

She said officials are facing “very tough” decisions to balance health and economic concerns. 

“What I want to tell people is even with us opening these things, it is not at all a time to stop being cautious and to lose your vigilance,” she said, advising residents to wear their masks.

Dzirasa said the city’s Covid-19 positivity rate is at about 5.8%. “At the beginning of July, it was 5.1%, and it’s well above the state's average, which was around 4%,” she said. 

Dzirasa attributed the rise to larger gatherings. 

“I think that particularly in young people, which is where we're seeing this higher rate of cases and this higher positivity rate, they could be asymptomatic and getting together and potentially spreading it,” she said. 

Watch:

8:36 a.m. ET, August 7, 2020

The US is approaching 5 million coronavirus cases

The US has recorded more than 4,880,000 cases of coronavirus since the pandemic began, according to the latest tally from John Hopkins University.

The country often records more than 40,000 new cases daily — and sometimes more than 60,000. That means the US is on track to soon surpass 5 million total cases.

Here's a look at new daily cases for the past two weeks:

8:24 a.m. ET, August 7, 2020

Libya reports record increase in cases

From CNN's  Jomana Karadsheh in Istanbul 

A Libyan doctor tests for the novel coronavirus with a blood sample taken from a shopkeeper in the Tajura area, a coastal suburb east of the capital Tripoli, on June 1.
A Libyan doctor tests for the novel coronavirus with a blood sample taken from a shopkeeper in the Tajura area, a coastal suburb east of the capital Tripoli, on June 1. Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images

Libya reported 404 new coronavirus cases Thursday, a record high for the country.

Libya has a total of 4,879 confirmed cases and 107 deaths, according to its National Center for Disease Control (NCDC) and Johns Hopkins University, but officials fear the case count could be much higher due to the country's extremely limited testing capability.

Last week, local authorities in the port city of Misrata declared a state of emergency after a significant increase in the number of cases there.

Libya’s UN-backed Government of National Accord extended a curfew for all areas under its control by another ten days, starting on Friday.

The daily curfew will be from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. local time, with a 24-hour curfew on Friday and Saturday. 

On Thursday, the government announced new preventative measures, including making the wearing of masks mandatory in public places and on public transport.

Businesses have been ordered not to accept customers without face masks and must have clear social distancing instructions.

Firms that do not comply with these measures or the curfew hours will face fines and suspension of licenses for repeated violations, the government said.

8:05 a.m. ET, August 7, 2020

Two German schools shut again after new cases

From CNN's Fred Pleitgen in Berlin

Goethe High School in Ludwigslust-Parchim, Germany, is pictured on August 7.
Goethe High School in Ludwigslust-Parchim, Germany, is pictured on August 7. Iris Leithold/dpa/picture alliance/Getty Images

Two schools in northeast Germany have closed due to coronavirus infections, state authorities announced on Friday. Both schools, the Ostsee elementary school and the Goethe High School, are in the state of Mecklenburg-West Pomerania. This was the first German state to re-open for classes, at the beginning of this week following the summer holidays.

In one of the schools, the Goethe High School, a teacher tested positive for the virus but had not yet given any lessons to students, the district of Ludwigslust-Parchim, where the school is located, announced on its website.

The school will remain shut until next Wednesday and all 55 teachers will be also be tested, local authorities said.

“Safety first! We will continuously inform parents, teachers and students about new developments,” Mayor Stefan Sternberg said in a statement on the district's official website. 

In the second school, the Ostsee Elementary School in the district of greater Rostock, a student tested positive for Covid-19, according to local authorities.

Rostock district said in a press release that all students and staff will be quarantined.

“The students will not be going to school for a limited amount of time. Our safety concept has the aim of reacting precisely and locally to any possible infection without having to resort to large scale school closures,” Mecklenburg-West Pomerania’s Education Minister Bettina Martin said in a statement published by state authorities. 

On Thursday the German government voiced concern over a recent spike in infections across the country, and urged citizens to follow pandemic rules like social distancing, mask wearing and sanitizing more closely.

8:02 a.m. ET, August 7, 2020

It's 1 p.m. in London and 8 a.m. in New York. Here's what you need to know

The novel coronavirus has infected more than 19 million people worldwide and caused more than 715,000 deaths. Here's the latest on the pandemic:

  • Hong Kong to launch universal testing: The city will offer voluntary, universal testing as officials scramble to contain a third wave of the virus.
  • Cases soar among young: The World Health Organization says the proportion of cases in young people has gone up six-fold during the pandemic.
  • Hawaii reinstates inter-island quarantine: Officials are tightening restrictions after a surge in Covid-19 cases statewide -- with the majority of the cases on the island of Oahu.
  • Young women more likely to experience poor mental health in lockdown: A study from University College London suggests that women aged 30 experienced an increase in mental health problems due to Covid-19.
7:50 a.m. ET, August 7, 2020

CDC shuts buildings after virus shutdown leads to Legionnaire's disease risk

From CNN Health's Maggie Fox

Legionella colonies are seen illuminated using ultraviolet light, cultured on an agar plate.
Legionella colonies are seen illuminated using ultraviolet light, cultured on an agar plate. Centers for Disease Control/Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says it has closed several buildings it leases in Atlanta because Legionella bacteria have been found in their water systems -- bacteria that likely grew because of the prolonged pandemic shutdown.

It's a problem that people across the country need to be on the lookout for, the CDC says. The bacteria, which can cause deadly pneumonia, grow in warm or stagnant water.

The plumbing in buildings that have been closed for months because of the coronavirus pandemic could provide a perfect breeding ground for Legionella and other waterborne pathogens, the CDC cautions.

It even happened to the CDC itself.

"During the recent closures at our leased space in Atlanta, working through the General Services Administration (GSA), CDC directed the landlord to take protective actions," the CDC said in a statement to CNN.
"Despite their best efforts, CDC has been notified that Legionella, which can cause Legionnaires' Disease, is present in a cooling tower as well as in some water sources in the buildings. Out of an abundance of caution, we have closed these buildings until successful remediation is complete."

Read more here.