July 22 coronavirus news

By Ben Westcott, Steve George, Tara John, Meg Wagner, Melissa Macaya and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 3:10 a.m. ET, July 23, 2020
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12:21 a.m. ET, July 22, 2020

Coronavirus will hit US county budgets to the tune of $202 billion, association says

From CNN Health’s Maggie Fox

The US’s 3,000 counties expect this year’s coronavirus pandemic to hit their budgets to the tune of $202 billion, meaning cuts in services, jobs and infrastructure projects, according to a survey published Tuesday.

Already, 71% of counties have cut or delayed capital investments such as infrastructure and economic development projects, the US' National Association of Counties (NACo) said in its report. And 68% reported they have cut services such as public safety and health services.

“Counties anticipate (a) $202 billion impact to budgets through FY2021, with widespread economic consequences,” the report reads.

“Alongside $30 billion of additional expenditures and $114 billion of lost county-generated revenue, NACo forecasts a $58 billion cut in state funding for counties as states collectively anticipate a $555 billion budget shortfall,” it adds.

The group said counties employ 328,000 hospital workers, 374,000 law enforcement officers, 93,000 firefighting staff and 200,000 public health workers. Jails, airports, 911 call centers, child and domestic protective services and services for the elderly could all be impacted.

8:43 a.m. ET, July 22, 2020

US daily coronavirus death toll tops 1,000

From CNN’s Brandon Miller

This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reveals ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reveals ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Tuesday’s reported deaths from coronavirus have topped 1,000 in the United States for the first time in two weeks, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

As of 9:45 p.m. ET, 1,056 deaths have been reported, along with 62,752 new cases of the virus. On July 7, the death toll was 1,195 -- the only other time in July that threshold has been crossed. Today’s death count will not be finalized for a few more hours.

So far this year, one-quarter of all days (59 out of 202) have seen a death toll from the virus exceeding 1,000.

5:23 a.m. ET, July 22, 2020

Colombia's coronavirus death toll surpasses 7,000

From CNN's Stefano Pozzebon

Colombia's health ministry reported 7,033 new Covid-19 cases Tuesday, bringing the country's total to 211,038 cases. 

The ministry also reported 239 new fatalities, bringing the nationwide total death toll to 7,166. 

Despite the growing number of cases, Health Minister Fernando Ruiz defended Colombia's strategy not to impose a nationwide lockdown and instead try to isolate the hotspots across the country. 

Speaking on television on Tuesday, Ruiz said, "This approach is much more effective than shutting down the whole country." 

12:20 a.m. ET, July 22, 2020

Pelosi: Trump has recognized the "mistakes that he has made"

From CNN's Josiah Ryan

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California speaks during a press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington DC, on Thursday, July 16.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California speaks during a press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington DC, on Thursday, July 16. Susan Walsh/AP

US Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday responded to President Donald Trump's briefing earlier in the day, in which he warned the pandemic would probably get worse before it gets better, saying he had realized his early actions and rhetoric were in error.

"He recognized the mistakes that he has made by now embracing mask wearing and the recognition this is not a hoax, it is a pandemic that has gotten worse before it will get better because of his inaction and in fact clearly it is the 'Trump virus,'" she said, speaking with CNN's Wolf Blitzer.

"If he had said months ago 'let's wear a mask, let's socially distance' instead of having rallies.... then more people would have followed his lead," Pelosi added. "He is the President of the United States."

In today's briefing that lasted around 30 minutes, Trump again said he believed the virus would disappear and insisted the American response to the pandemic was "much better" than in other places.

But he also offered more realistic projections that his advisers hope will make him appear like a sober-minded leader.

"It will probably unfortunately get worse before it gets better," Trump said, echoing a prediction he made at the start of April of a "rough" two weeks ahead.

Pelosi suggested that Trump ought to have taken the tone he took today in March, instead of waiting until the virus surged across the country.

"If it's important to wear a mask now, it would have been important to wear it in March instead of telling us that by April, we would all be going to church together," she said. "I wish that were the case."

5:23 a.m. ET, July 22, 2020

Indianapolis 500 to require fans wear face coverings

From CNN's Kevin Dotson

Fans attend the NTT IndyCar Series 103rd running of the Indianapolis 500 on May 26, 2019.
Fans attend the NTT IndyCar Series 103rd running of the Indianapolis 500 on May 26, 2019. Michael Allio/Icon Sportswire/Getty Images

Indianapolis Motor Speedway officials announced Tuesday that fan attendance of approximately 25% of capacity will be allowed at the 2020 Indianapolis 500, and all attendees will be required to wear face coverings.

Race officials originally announced in late June a planned attendance of 50% of capacity, but said Tuesday that policies and procedures put into effect by Indianapolis Motor Speedway led to this new reduced attendance.

Before the coronavirus outbreak, Indy 500 organizers were hoping to draw more than 300,000 attendees this year. Twenty-five percent of that total would still make the 2020 Indy 500 the most attended sporting event in the US since the onset of the pandemic.

The race is scheduled for August 23 after being postponed from its original date of May 24.

Race officials plan to unveil a nearly 100-page plan of guidelines and protocols for how the race will be run on July 22.

12:10 a.m. ET, July 22, 2020

UC Berkeley to begin fall semester online only

From CNN's Sarah Moon

The iconic Sather Gate on the campus of UC Berkeley in downtown Berkeley, California, on October 9, 2018.
The iconic Sather Gate on the campus of UC Berkeley in downtown Berkeley, California, on October 9, 2018. Smith Collection/Gado/Sipa/AP

The University of California, Berkeley, will begin fall semester with “fully remote instruction,” the university announced in a statement to its faculty and staff on Tuesday.

Citing trend lines and the increase in coronavirus cases across California and Alameda County, the university said a “dramatic reversal in the public health situation” is unlikely before the semester begins on August 26.

“We continue our preparations to implement hybrid and/or flexible modes of instruction as soon as public health conditions allow,” UC Berkeley said. 

The fully remote option is open for all students, according to the statement. UC Berkeley plans to continue with remote education after Thanksgiving, even if some in-person instruction becomes available.

UC Berkeley is the first among 10 campuses across the state to announce its decision to begin the semester entirely online.

5:23 a.m. ET, July 22, 2020

Brazil reports more than 41,000 new coronavirus cases

From Rodrigo Pedroso, Fernanda Wenzel and Sugam Pokharel

People attend the burial of Jose Mario de Souza Veiga, 83, whose family said died of COVID-19, at the Campo da Esperanca cemetery in Brasilia, Brazil, on Tuesday, July 21.
People attend the burial of Jose Mario de Souza Veiga, 83, whose family said died of COVID-19, at the Campo da Esperanca cemetery in Brasilia, Brazil, on Tuesday, July 21. Eraldo Peres/AP

Brazil reported 41,008 new coronavirus cases on Tuesday, bringing the total to 2,159,654, the country's health ministry said.

The ministry also registered 1,367 new fatalities due to the virus, raising the total death toll to 81,487.

Earlier Tuesday, the Pan American Health Organization said Covid-19 "is showing no signs of slowing down" in the Americas.

"There have been a total of 7.7 million cases and more than 311,000 deaths reported in the region as of July 20," PAHO Director Dr. Carissa Etienne said in Tuesday's briefing.