July 13 coronavirus news

56 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
12:08 p.m. ET, July 13, 2020

Understanding of Covid-19 transmission in children still limited, WHO says

From CNN's Naomi Thomas

Technical lead head Covid-19 Maria Van Kerkhove attends a press conference organized by Geneva Association of United Nations Correspondents on July 3 at the WHO headquarters in Geneva.
Technical lead head Covid-19 Maria Van Kerkhove attends a press conference organized by Geneva Association of United Nations Correspondents on July 3 at the WHO headquarters in Geneva. Fabrice Coffrini/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Maria van Kerkhove, the World Health Organization’s technical lead for coronavirus response, emphasized during a briefing Monday that the understanding of coronavirus transmission in children is still limited. 

“Children do seem to be less affected, but they can be infected. And that is important,” said van Kerkhove. “Our understanding of transmission in children is still limited.”

The virus is less prevalent among young children, van Kerkhove said, while children about 10 and older appear to have about the same prevalence as young adults.

However, she pointed out that children can have severe disease, and children have died from Covid-19.

“They can be infected, which we’ve said from the beginning, but they do tend to have more mild disease,” she said. “In terms of transmission, there’s quite a lot that we still need to understand about transmission in children.”

In relation to schools reopening, van Kerkhove said that WHO has issued guidance on the safe running of schools and also on considerations of when schools should reopen and that there are a number of considerations that need to take place. 

These include transmission in the local area and the ability of the school structure to be able to implement measures like social distancing and hand washing. 

Van Kerkhove said they have heard of some outbreaks in schools, mainly among older children. 

12:06 p.m. ET, July 13, 2020

Long-term strategy to lower community transmission key to reopening schools, WHO says

From CNN's Amanda Watts

Dr. Mike Ryan, executive director of WHO's Health Emergencies Programme, attends a press conference in Geneva, Switzerland, on July 3.
Dr. Mike Ryan, executive director of WHO's Health Emergencies Programme, attends a press conference in Geneva, Switzerland, on July 3. Fabrice Coffrini/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

The World Health Organization is warning countries against using school reopenings as “political footballs that get kicked around the place.”

During a Monday briefing, Dr. Mike Ryan, executive director of WHO's Health Emergencies Program, said “it's not fair on our children.”   

“There are many countries around the world in which schools are reopening successfully, and safely, because countries have dealt with the real problem: community transmission,” Ryan said. 

“The problem we have in some countries right now is that it's very difficult to determine the safety of any environment because there's just so much transmission going on, that all potential environments in which people mix are essentially problematic,” he added.  

Ryan said, “the fact remains that when community transmission exists and when community transmission is intense, children will be exposed to that virus, and children will be part of the transmission cycle.” 

The best way to reopen schools, Ryan said, is by lowering community transmission using a “comprehensive long-term strategy” that looks at “everything at one time.”

“We can't move from – let’s deal with the schools and then we will deal with that for a week or two, and then let's deal with the workplace, and then let's deal with infection and hospitals or long-term care facilities. This is playing whack a mole,” he said. "We got to chew gum and walk at the same time.”

12:05 p.m. ET, July 13, 2020

10 people died from coronavirus yesterday in New York, governor says

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that 10 more people have died from coronavirus in the state. He said, "we'd love to see that number at zero" but acknowledged it is a "very good place to be" compared to the daily death toll during the height of the pandemic.

The governor said New York tested more than 51,000 people yesterday and 557 were positive (1.08%). On the positivity rate, he said "it is all good news" in the state.

Cuomo noted that numbers have actually gone down in the state, despite fears that there would be an uptick after reopening. 

“The numbers show that what we have done in terms of our reopening strategy and plan has worked,” Cuomo said.

Earlier today, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that there had been no deaths in the city in a 24-hour period.

"Twenty four hours where no one dies, let’s have many more days like that,” de Blaiso said, calling the news "so striking and so moving."

12:01 p.m. ET, July 13, 2020

Pelosi expresses concerns about reopening schools, calls for more resources

From CNN's Haley Byrd

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during a news conference in Washington, DC, on July 9.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during a news conference in Washington, DC, on July 9. Jacquelyn Martin/AP

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on MSNBC Monday discussed the prospect of reopening schools in the coming months as the coronavirus pandemic surges around the country, raising fears about safety. 

“The biggest risk to the spread of the pandemic is opening up the schools in a way that is not safe,” she said. “So if we’re going to defeat this pandemic, we shouldn’t be opening up to more arena to spread."

In the interview, she said the “biggest concern is safety” and called for Congress to approve funding for schools to adjust to the pandemic, including broadband provisions for low income students to allow remote learning. 

“Without the resources, we shouldn’t even be thinking about sending them back to school,” Pelosi said.

She also reiterated her call for President Trump to implement the Defense Production Act to manufacture personal protective equipment.

Pelosi said effective testing is essential for the United States to move forward.

“There’s no use in taking a test if you’re not going to get your results until a week later,” she said.

Asked about the plight of American schoolchildren who face domestic abuse situations at home or who don’t have food security and rely on school to eat breakfast and lunch, Pelosi said addressing their needs is “something we have always fought for."

But, she added, “it’s not a question of balancing equities, it’s a question of crossing a threshold of safety.”

1:16 p.m. ET, July 13, 2020

New York City reports no coronavirus deaths in 24-hour period for the first time, mayor says

From, CNN's Brian Vitagliano

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said there were no deaths reported within a 24-hour period — a first for the city since the start of the pandemic.

“The fact is for the first time in months we have a 24-hour period where no one in this city died from the Coronavirus, it is so striking and so moving, be Blasio said at a news conference, 

“Twenty four hours where no one dies, let’s have many more days like that,” the mayor added. 

Despite this good news, de Blasio also said there is a rising infection rates among people in their 20s, a trend he calls, "worrisome."

What the city is doing now: The mayor said the city will be “doubling down” on young adults by offering more mobile testing vans, outreach programs and mask giveaways. 

The city, according to the mayor is issuing new guidance on face coverings, saying New Yorkers should wear a face covering as much as possible when around other people in an indoor setting that is not their home. 

Mayor de Blasio said the city has set up 10 new testing sites in the Bronx, Queens and Brooklyn. 

“Our federal government never had testing in place from the beginning, they still don’t have enough… the federal government needs to step up now,” Mayor de Blasio said Monday. 

11:10 a.m. ET, July 13, 2020

Two countries accounted for 50% of new cases worldwide yesterday, WHO says

From CNN's Amanda Watts

On Sunday, two countries accounted for half of all new cases added worldwide, World Health Director Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said during a media briefing in Geneva on Monday.

“Yesterday, 230,000 cases of Covid-19 were reported to WHO. Almost 80% of those cases were reported from just 10 countries, and 50% come from just two countries,” he said.

Tedros did not name the countries, but according to a Johns Hopkins university tally of cases, the United States, India and Brazil accounted for more than 112,000 cases on Sunday.

“Let me be blunt: Too many countries are headed in the wrong direction,” Tedros said.

“The virus remains public enemy number one,” Tedros said. “But the actions of many governments and people do not reflect of this. "

Here's a look at the total number of confirmed cases by country:

Tedros added that “mixed messages from leaders are undermining the most critical ingredients of any response: trust."

“If governments do not clearly communicate with their citizens and roll out a comprehensive strategy focused on suppressing transmission and saving lives. If populations do not follow the basic principles of physical distancing, hand washing, wearing masks,” Tedros warned, “there is only one way this is going to go. It's going to get worse and worse and worse.”

“But, it does not have to be this way,” he said. 

“It's never too late to bring the virus under control, even if there has been explosive transmission,” Tedros said. “WHO is committed to working with all countries.”

11:22 a.m. ET, July 13, 2020

Argentina records more than 100,000 Covid-19 cases

From CNN’s Claudia Dominguez in Atlanta

Paramedics work in Buenos Aires on July 2.
Paramedics work in Buenos Aires on July 2. Marcelo Endelli/Getty Images

Argentina reached 100,166 confirmed Covid-19 cases, according to a report published by Argentina's Health Ministry on Sunday.

The report confirmed 2,657 new cases and 27 deaths. Argentina has reported at least 1,845 deaths to date due to Covid-19 as of Sunday night.

Argentina's president Alberto Fernandez made a call for unity on Sunday via Twitter, asking Argentines to "come together" to overcome the virus.

On Monday morning, the governor of Buenos Aires, former Economy Minister Axel Kicillof, and Buenos Aires mayor Horacio Rodriguez Larreta met to discuss whether the lockdown in the capital and surrounding cities should be extended, and what measure could be lifted, according to Argentina's official news agency Telam. The current restrictions will continue in place until next Friday. 

The Argentine government had imposed a very strict lockdown that began on March 20, but hopes of controlling the pandemic was not met as cases continually rise. Currently, Buenos Aires and the surrounding cities, and at least four other provinces continue under phase one, the most restrictive phase of lockdown in the country. 

10:52 a.m. ET, July 13, 2020

"There will be no return to the old normal for the foreseeable future," WHO director-general says

From CNN Health’s Naomi Thomas

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organization, attends a press conference in Geneva, Switzerland, on July 3.
Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organization, attends a press conference in Geneva, Switzerland, on July 3. Fabrice Coffrini/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organization, said Monday “There will be no return to the old normal for the foreseeable future."

Speaking at a media briefing in Geneva, he added, “But there is a roadmap to a situation where we can control the disease and get on with our lives.”

“We need to reach a sustainable situation where we do have adequate control of this virus without shutting down our lives entirely or lurching from lockdown to lockdown,” he said.

In order to get to this place, Tedros said that three things would be required. These are a focus on reducing mortality and suppressing transmission; an “empowered, engaged community” that takes individual measures to protect the whole community; and strong government leadership and communication.

“It can be done. It must be done,” Tedros said.

Tedros said that there are no shortcuts out of this pandemic, and that while we hope for an effective vaccine, there must be a focus on using the tools that are available now to suppress transmission and save lives.

10:54 a.m. ET, July 13, 2020

More than 8,000 patients are hospitalized with Covid-19 in Florida

From CNN's Artemis Moshtaghian and Christina Maxouris

There are a total of 8,038 patients hospitalized across the state of Florida with the primary diagnosis of coronavirus as of Monday morning, according to new numbers released by the Agency for Health Care Administration. 

The three most populous counties: Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach County, are experiencing the highest numbers of coronavirus related hospitalizations.

Florida continues to record alarming rates of cases. Health officials reported Sunday a staggering record of new cases in a single day: 15,300.

If Florida were a country, it would be the fourth-highest in the world in reporting new cases. The state would rank 10th in terms of having the most cases, according to data from Johns Hopkins.