June 10 coronavirus news

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8:23 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

US will run key studies on 3 coronavirus vaccines starting this summer

From CNN's Jim Sciutto and Jamie Gumbrecht

The US government will fund and conduct key studies on three experimental coronavirus vaccines – those developed by Moderna, Oxford University/AstraZeneca, and Johnson & Johnson, Dr. Anthony Fauci confirmed to CNN. 

Phase three trials, which typically involve tens of thousands of people and measure whether a vaccine is safe and effective, will begin with Moderna in July, then Oxford/AstraZeneca in August and Johnson & Johnson in September. 

The funding and trial timing were first reported by the Wall Street Journal.  

“The coronavirus vaccine effort is progressing very well and we expect more than one candidate vaccine to be in advanced clinical testing by early summer,” Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told Sciutto. “This is good news for the overall coronavirus vaccine effort.”

Each phase three trial is expected to take place at more than 50 sites, mostly in the United States, but possibly in other countries, too. The trials, which are expected to include about 30,000 people, will begin only after there’s enough evidence of safety and efficacy from earlier trial stages. 

The US government might also plan phase three trials for additional coronavirus vaccines currently in development.

According to the World Health Organization, there are 10 vaccines currently in human trials and 126 more in development.

8:22 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Fauci says coronavirus spread due to protests "disturbing" but "not surprising"

From CNN's Betsy Klein

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases just reacted to news that the DC National Guard said some of its troops contracted coronavirus after responding to protests.

He called the development “disturbing,” but “not surprising,” given the lack of social distancing amid protests last week.

“The most important thing, unfortunately, the report of the national guardsmen being infected is certainly disturbing but is not surprising. The issue of physical separation is important. Masks can help, but it’s masks plus physical separation,” Fauci said during an appearance on ABC’s Good Morning America.

He added, “And when you get congregations like we saw with the demonstrations. As we have said, myself and other health officials, that’s taking a risk, and unfortunately, what we’re seeing now is just an example of the kinds of things that we were concerned about.”

8:02 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Germany will lift border controls with France, Austria, Denmark and Sweden next week

From CNN's Stephanie Halasz

German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer speaks at a conference about the planned dismantling of Germany's border controls, in Berlin, on Wednesday, June 10.
German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer speaks at a conference about the planned dismantling of Germany's border controls, in Berlin, on Wednesday, June 10. Jorg Carstensen/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Germany will lift its border controls with neighbors France, Austria, Switzerland and Denmark on June 15, German interior minister Horst Seehofer said today.

New arrivals from Italy will also no longer have to go through border controls, though the two countries do not share a physical border.

The controls will be relaxed for travelers arriving from Spain by plane starting on June 21, Seehofer added.

The easing of restrictions comes as the country slowly rolls back its strictest lockdown measures.

8:00 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

It's 1 p.m. in London and 8 a.m. in New York. Here's what you need to know about the pandemic

Medical professionals push a stretcher outside the Covid-19 ward at LNJP Hospital in New Delhi, on June 9.
Medical professionals push a stretcher outside the Covid-19 ward at LNJP Hospital in New Delhi, on June 9. Biplov Bhuyan/Hindustan Times/Getty Images

The novel coronavirus has infected more than 7 million people worldwide and killed over 400,000. Here's what you need to know about the pandemic:

  • Warning over Covid-19 in India's capital: New Delhi could see as many as 550,000 cases of Covid-19 by July 31 if the virus continues to spread unabated in the city, Delhi's Disaster Management Authority said Tuesday.
  • Russian company recalls ventilator model: A factory in Siberia is recalling its flagship ventilator model from all Russian hospitals after two machines caught fire in coronavirus hospitals a month ago, state media reported.
  • Germany extends travel warning: The country has advised its citizens to avoid non-essential travel until August 31. EU countries, Schengen members and the UK are exempt from the warning.
  • Singapore approves key antiviral drug: The city state's health authority has approved use of remdesivir to be used to treat some coronavirus patients. The drug is the only one shown to work against the disease.
7:57 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Germany extends official warning against global travel to August 31

From CNN's Stephanie Halasz

A nearly deserted departure area is seen at an airport in Duesseldorf, Germany, on June 5.
A nearly deserted departure area is seen at an airport in Duesseldorf, Germany, on June 5. Ying Tang/NurPhoto/Getty Images

Germany has extended its advice to citizens warning against global travel “for unnecessary and touristic reasons” until August 31.

Travel to other EU countries, Schengen members and the UK is exempt from the warning, the German Foreign Office said in a statement.

The country first issued advice warning citizens against tourist travel worldwide on March 17.

"Unlike our European neighbours, for the rest of the world we do not yet have the common, reliable data bases, criteria and coordination processes that make unrestricted travel possible again without incalculable risks," the statement published Wednesday says.
"We cannot and will not risk that Germans will be again stranded all over the world in summer or that vacationers will carry the virus to Germany undetected.
"At the same time, we are very aware that many citizens want to travel outside of Europe again as quickly as possible.
"This affects vacation destinations in Turkey and North Africa but also Southeast Asia and America. The point at which such trips are also justifiable again for tourist purposes will depend on the course of the pandemic.”
7:19 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Singapore approves use of antiviral drug for Covid-19 patients

From CNN's Isaac Yee

A health worker takes a nasal swab sample from an essential worker to test for Covid-19 in Singapore, on June 10.
A health worker takes a nasal swab sample from an essential worker to test for Covid-19 in Singapore, on June 10. Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

Singapore’s Health Sciences Authority (HSA) has granted conditional approval for the antiviral drug remdesivir to be used to treat some patients infected with the novel coronavirus.

Remdesivir is the only drug known to work against Covid-19.

“The Health Sciences Authority (HSA), in consultation with its Medicines Advisory Committee, has today granted conditional approval for [the drug],” a spokesperson for the HSA said in a statement released on Wednesday.

The authority said the conditional approval would allow specialists to administer the drug to virus patients who require supplemental oxygen and more intensive breathing support. Those with levels of oxygen saturation below 94% are also eligible for treatment.

"Although the data on [remdesivir's] efficacy and safety is very limited at this point, HSA has expedited the review of remdesivir given the urgent public health need during the coronavirus pandemic," the spokesperson added.

Singapore confirmed 451 new cases of coronavirus on Wednesday, bringing the total number of cases in the country to 38,965.

6:25 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Global economy will take at least 2 years to recover from coronavirus, says economic body

From CNN's Robert North

A closed cafe is pictured in St. Mark's Square in Venice, Italy, on May 18.
A closed cafe is pictured in St. Mark's Square in Venice, Italy, on May 18. Simone Padovani/Awakening/Getty Images

The global economy will take at least two years to recover from the impact of coronavirus, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which is formed of 37 nations worldwide.

In its latest global outlook, the intergovernmental economic body warns that the pandemic has caused “the most severe economic recession in nearly a century and is causing enormous damage to people’s health, jobs and well-being.”

The report lays out two scenarios for the global economy.

In one scenario a second wave of infections, with renewed lock-downs, hits before the end of 2020.

In this so-called double-hit scenario the OECD sees world economic output falling 7.6% this year, before climbing back 2.8% in 2021. 

In the second scenario another major outbreak is avoided. If that were to occur, the OECD forecasts a 6% fall in economic activity in 2020.

5:33 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

It's still safe to perform CPR during the pandemic, study says

From CNN's Ryan Prior

Shutterstock
Shutterstock

Imagine taking a walk in your neighborhood, carefully staying 6 feet apart from others to ensure social distancing.

You see an elderly man collapse on the sidewalk, having a heart attack.

Everything you've heard of late tells you to avoid close contact with strangers, especially the elderly, during the pandemic.

Is it safe to perform CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) to try to save his life? Or are you risking being infected with the novel coronavirus?

There's an answer: It's strongly encouraged that people perform CPR or chest compressions on others during the global pandemic, according to a report published by a group of Seattle emergency room physicians in the journal Circulation.

In fact, you may actually be hundreds of times more likely to save the dying man's life than you yourself are to die from Covid-19 by coming to his aid.

Read more here.

6:08 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

China removes mammal linked to coronavirus spread from official traditional medicine list

From CNN's Ben Westcott

Pangolin
Pangolin Cover Images/AP Images

The Chinese government has removed pangolin scales from its 2020 list of approved ingredients used in traditional Chinese medicine, a move campaigners describe as a "critical step" towards saving the world's most trafficked mammal.

According to Chinese state-run media Tuesday, the latest edition of Chinese Pharmacopoeia -- an official government compendium of drugs covering traditional Chinese and Western medicines -- no longer includes pangolin scales on the list of approved ingredients, owing to "wild resources exhaustion."

The latest move to protect pangolins comes in the wake of new research that suggests pangolins kept in wildlife markets across China may have helped incubate the novel coronavirus before it spread to humans.

The virus has now infected more than 7 million people across the world since it was detected last December in the Chinese city of Wuhan, including at least 84,000 cases in mainland China.

According to a team of researchers from Duke University and Los Alamos National Laboratory, the virus swapped genes repeatedly with similar strains infecting bats, pangolins and a possible third species prior to jumping to humans.

The researchers concluded that although it was too soon to blame pangolins for the pandemic, it was clear that people must reduce their contact with wild animals that can transmit new infections.

Following the outbreak, the Chinese government outlawed the consumption of all wild animals countrywide in an effort to avoid further deadly outbreaks.

Read more here.