June 5 coronavirus news

By Ben Westcott, Brett McKeehan, Laura Smith-Spark and Peter Wilkinson, CNN

Updated 1:41 p.m. ET, June 8, 2020
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1:41 p.m. ET, June 8, 2020

UPenn will not require SAT or ACT tests for admission consideration 

From CNN's Meridith Edwards

A person walks near College Hall on the University of Pennsylvania campus in Philadelphia on March 20, 2016.
A person walks near College Hall on the University of Pennsylvania campus in Philadelphia on March 20, 2016. Beth J. Harpaz/AP

For the first time, the University of Pennsylvania will be "test-optional" and will not require the SAT or ACT exams for the 2020-21 first-year or transfer admission cycles. 

The university said it sees the tests as "one piece of a more comprehensive evaluation process that considers individual students in the context of their academic and personal experiences."

"Penn Admissions acknowledges the benefits and limitations built into standardized tests, but because the College Board recently announced that an at-home version of the SAT will not be offered as planned, the capacity for in-person examinations has been severely limited due to Covid-19 so these combined factors will prevent thousands of students from taking the SAT exam. The scale of these challenges is unprecedented," according to a university spokesperson.

The university said it will continue to "follow the rules and regulations of the Ivy League in the recruitment of student-athletes to the institution."

In April, the College Board announced that If schools haven't reopened by the fall, students will be able to take the SAT from home.

CORRECTION: The photo caption in this post has been updated to reflect the building in the photo is College Hall.

11:41 a.m. ET, June 5, 2020

NYC will launch mobile Covid-19 testing sites and is still on track to reopen Monday, mayor says

From CNN's Sheena Jones

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks during a press conference in New York on June 5.
New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks during a press conference in New York on June 5. NYC Media

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced in a news conference today that the city would launch mobile testing sites next week and is still on track to reopen on Monday.

Nearly 32,000 construction sites are eligible to restart during this initial reopening phase, de Blasio said.

The city will deploy two trucks to two neighborhoods, one in Queens and the other in the Bronx, to do Covid-19 diagnostic tests for residents in those areas, de Blasio said.

The city is looking to have up to 10 trucks in July. There will be walk-ins, with a capacity of 80 tests per truck per day.

"You can literally stay in your neighborhood and the testing trucks will come to you," de Blasio said.

The mayor said people need to be reminded that testing is “always free, it is easy, it's fast and it is coming to you.” 

de Blasio explained that the idea for the initiative arose after the city government spoke to community members about what their needs were in battling the virus.

The mayor said mobile testing is needed in "neighborhoods hit hard so that people can more easily connect with testing."

"I want every New Yorker to get tested," de Blasio said. He added that he “strongly urges” anyone who has been to any of the protests to get tested.

Here are the details of the mobile testing program:

9:58 a.m. ET, June 5, 2020

 Dow surges 700 points following jobs report

From CNN’s David Goldman

The New York Stock Exchange is pictured on May 26 at Wall Street in New York.
The New York Stock Exchange is pictured on May 26 at Wall Street in New York. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

US stocks rocketed higher Friday morning after the US Labor Department said America added 2.5 million jobs last month.

That shocking announcement confirmed investors’ hopes that the economy was starting to bounce back from the depths of the coronavirus pandemic.

Here is where things stood at opening:

  • The Dow opened 700 points higher.
  • The S&P 500 was up 2%
  • The Nasdaq, which is up 1.2%, is just about 100 points away from hitting an all-time high.
9:03 a.m. ET, June 5, 2020

Universal Orlando reopens to the public today

Volcano Bay at Universal Orlando
Volcano Bay at Universal Orlando Willie J. Allen Jr./Universal Orlando

Universal Studios Florida, Universal's Islands of Adventure and Universal's Volcano Bay are set to reopen to the public today with limited attendance.

"This carefully managed reopening comes with stringent new health, safety and hygiene procedures in place. So, as we enjoy our parks together again, everyone will need to follow CDC guidelines and the recommendations of health officials, and Universal Orlando's policies," the resort said in a statement released last month.

Here are the new guidelines for guests:

  • Universal will implement guest temperature checks, and guests with a temperature of 100.4 degrees or higher, will not be able to enter, according to the fact sheet.
  • Everyone will be required to wear a face covering during their visit. If a guest doesn’t have a face covering, they'll be available for purchase. 
  • Spacing will be implemented in ride vehicles and lines.
  • All menus will be single-use, mobile ordering will be available for select venues
  • Guests will be required to use hand sanitizer prior to boarding rides.

The company tweeted out a video outlining its new guidelines for park visitors.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed off on Universal's plans, the company said. The reopening proposal was presented last month at a virtual meeting of the Orange County Economic Recovery Task Force. The task force approved the proposal, as did Orange County Mayor Jerry Demings.

The company released their park hours in a tweet this morning:

9:57 a.m. ET, June 5, 2020

Jakarta's mosques reopen at reduced capacity after three months due to Covid-19

From CNN's Sandi Sidhu in Hong Kong 

Muslims pray as they maintain so spaced apart during a Friday prayers as mosques and other places of worship reopen amid ongoing social restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, at the Cut Mutia Mosque in Jakarta, Indonesia, on June 5, 2020.- PHOTOGRAPH BY Jefta Images / Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo credit should read Jefta Images/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
Muslims pray as they maintain so spaced apart during a Friday prayers as mosques and other places of worship reopen amid ongoing social restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, at the Cut Mutia Mosque in Jakarta, Indonesia, on June 5, 2020.- PHOTOGRAPH BY Jefta Images / Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo credit should read Jefta Images/Barcroft Media via Getty Images) Jefta Images/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mosques across Indonesia's capital city of Jakarta reopened Friday for the first time in three months.

The mass prayer led by Indonesia's President Joko Widodo (Jokowi) at the Baiturrahim Mosque, the Presidential Palace Complex, was the first to be held at the mosque since the implementation of large-scale social distancing in Jakarta due to Covid-19, according to state-run news Antara .  

In line with the country's health protocols to curb the spread of Covid-19, the president wore a mask and had to undergo a body temperature check-up before entering the mosque.

Friday's prayer was performed in accordance with stringent health protocols, including body temperature scanning and implementation of physical distancing among worshipers, according to information from the press, media and the Information Bureau of the Presidential Secretariat.

Among the reopening measures, worshipers are required to carry along their own respective prayer equipment, wear masks, and wash in accordance with the Islamic teachings before visiting the mosque. 

The capacity of the mosque has been temporarily reduced to only 150 worshipers, from its normal capacity of 750 worshipers.

Some context: Indonesia is home to the world's largest Muslim population. But as Covid-19 cases were rapidly increasing, the government declared a national public health emergency on March 31.

A holiday travel ban was imposed on all road, air and sea during Ramadan, Islam's holiest month; and tens of thousands of troops were deployed at checkpoints to enforce the regulations to prevent the disease from further spreading.

9:05 a.m. ET, June 5, 2020

US unemployment rate declines to 13.3%

From CNN’s Anneken Tappe

The US economy gained 2.5 million American jobs in May. The unemployment rate fell to 13.3%, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ jobs report.

Economists expected the unemployment rate to be even worse in May, rising to nearly 20%. But the gradual reopening of the economy actually added new jobs rather than eliminating further positions.

"These improvements in the labor market reflected a limited resumption of economic activity that had been curtailed in March and April due to the coronavirus pandemic and efforts to contain it," said William W. Beach, commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in a statement.

The labor market rebounded from April's drastic losses, when a revised 20.7 million jobs vanished. The unemployment rate last month soared to 14.7% as businesses shut during the coronavirus lockdown.

8:26 a.m. ET, June 5, 2020

Coronavirus fight not over "until there is no virus anywhere in the world," WHO says

From CNN's Niamh Kennedy

The fight against the coronavirus will not be over “until there is no virus anywhere in the world,” according to World Health Organization (WHO) spokesperson Dr. Margaret Harris.

Speaking at a press briefing in Geneva, Harris confirmed that there have been “upticks” of the virus in countries which have eased measures, but she said that she was “not talking specifically about Europe”.

 “When the lockdowns ease, when the social distancing measures ease, people sometimes interpret this as 'OK, it's over." she said.

The World Health Organization has continually affirmed that countries easing measures should do so gradually and cautiously.

 

8:23 a.m. ET, June 5, 2020

Long-term care facilities are a major driver of Covid-19 deaths in the US, report says

From CNN Health’s Andrea Kane

Family members of Hortensia Sosa, who died from COVID-19 at a nursing home in Visalia, California, mourn over her grave in Dinuba, California, on May 3.
Family members of Hortensia Sosa, who died from COVID-19 at a nursing home in Visalia, California, mourn over her grave in Dinuba, California, on May 3. Melina Mara/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Twenty-six states report that 50% or more of their Covid-19 deaths occurred in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) – such as nursing homes and group homes – according to a report by three doctors at Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine.

Minnesota and Rhode Island top the list, each reporting that 81% of Covid-19 deaths occurred in long-term care facilities, followed by Connecticut with 71% and New Hampshire with 70%.

New York reported the lowest proportion of Covid-19 deaths in long-term care facilities: 21%. The study authors say that is likely a “gross underestimate” caused in part by lack of available coronavirus testing in long-term care facilities, coupled with the fact that Covid-19 deaths were only counted as such if they were backed by a positive test.

Eleven states do not report the number of Covid-19 deaths that occur in long-term care facilities, which the authors say has contributed to an underestimate of the total number of Covid-19 deaths in the United States.

“Once we get accurate counts of the COVID-19 deaths in all states, we will likely see a big increase in the total number of deaths in the United States,” Dr.Thomas Perls, professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine and one of the study’s authors, said in a statement.

How is this compared to other countries? The study authors write that the numbers are not out of line with what many other countries are reporting. “Most other countries with large numbers of LTCFs are likely also experiencing a greater than 50% rate of their COVID-19 deaths within LTCFs. The World Health Organization estimates that half of COVID-19 deaths in Europe and the Baltics are among their 4.1 million LTCF residents,” they write. “Once France began to include LTCF deaths in its count, the country’s death rate nearly doubled. Canada’s National Institute on Aging indicated on May 6 that 82% of the country’s COVID-19 deaths had been in long term care settings.”

Why are nursing homes and other long-term care facilities so vulnerable? Among the many reasons, the article notes that they have “a high density of people with a combination of the strongest risk factors for COVID-19 associated severe illness and death: old age and multiple morbidities.” The CDC indicates that 39% of the 1.3 million nursing home residents in the U.S. are 85 and older.

This analysis used data from 40 states and Washington, DC, from the Kaiser Family Foundation and from the Massachusetts Department of Health. It was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society on Friday.                                                             

8:23 a.m. ET, June 5, 2020

Britons are leaving their homes but most aren't wearing face coverings

From CNN's Max Ramsay in London

A sign asking people to use face coverings is pictured outside Waterloo station in London, on Friday, June 5.
A sign asking people to use face coverings is pictured outside Waterloo station in London, on Friday, June 5. Jonathan Brady/PA Images/Getty Images

A survey by the UK’s Office for National Statistics has given an insight into how Britons are behaving and feeling as coronavirus lockdown conditions ease.

Nine in 10 people said they had left their homes in seven days before they were surveyed, the ONS found. The survey was conducted between May 28 and 31.

However, only 28% of adults reported they had used face coverings outside their home in that seven-day period.

The government announced Thursday that face coverings would be mandatory on all public transport in England starting June 15. The rule could be enforced by the country's transport police, Transport Minister Grant Shapps said. Exceptions will be made for children, the elderly and those with respiratory problems.

Other findings included:

  • 40% of adults in employment said they had left their home to travel to and from work, up from 36% the week before.
  • 41% of adults said they felt safe or very safe when outside of their home in the prior 7 days, up from 36% the week before.
  • 63% of relevant parents in England felt either very or quite unconfident in sending their children back to school in June.
  • 69% of adults said they were very or somewhat worried about the effect coronavirus was having on their life now.

The United Kingdom has recorded nearly 40,000 Covid-19-related deaths, the second-highest number in the world after the United States.