June 3 coronavirus news

By Joshua Berlinger, Adam Renton and Laura Smith-Spark, CNN

Updated 9:03 PM ET, Wed June 3, 2020
19 Posts
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2:21 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

USC plans to resume in-person classes in the fall

From CNN's Sarah Moon

USC moved all its courses online as the coronavirus pandemic spread throughout the United States.
USC moved all its courses online as the coronavirus pandemic spread throughout the United States. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

The University of Southern California plans to resume in-person classes for the fall semester starting August, USC President Carol Folt said in a letter to students on Tuesday.

Folt said that starting the week of August 10, orientation for incoming students will be conducted online. Small, in-person events will be held if possible.

“While we still have many details to work out, we are planning for an in-person fall semester for students beginning on August 17, 2020, a week earlier than originally scheduled,” she said.

Folt said the plans, however, are "contingent on several factors, including the continued spread of COVID-19, and the health orders from state and local authorities.”

The university is planning to mandate that anyone on campus and in a classroom wear face coverings and practice physical distancing. Every in-person class for undergraduate students will also be offered online, the letter said. Classrooms and offices are being reconfigured to meet physical distancing requirements.

According to the letter, all classes, including final exams, will end by Thanksgiving to minimize the spread of the coronavirus as flu season starts. There will be no fall break.

“Things could change, but we are excited to move forward and to have you back,” Folt said.

USC is one of the biggest schools in Southern California. A total of 48,500 students were enrolled in the 2019-2020 academic year, according the university’s website. Like many schools across the United States, USC moved all its courses online as the coronavirus pandemic spread throughout the country.

2:02 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

It's just past 11:30 a.m. in New Delhi and 3 p.m. in Seoul. Here are the latest headlines

A worker sprays disinfectant to help contain the spread of the coronavirus outside a hospital in Manacapuru, Amazonas state, Brazil on June 2.
A worker sprays disinfectant to help contain the spread of the coronavirus outside a hospital in Manacapuru, Amazonas state, Brazil on June 2. Felipe Dana/AP

The novel coronavirus has infected nearly 6.4 million people and killed at least 380,000 worldwide. If you're just joining us, here's what you should know:

  • India cases surge: The country reported nearly 9,000 new Covid-19 infections today -- a highest single-day spike that pushes its total over 200,000 cases. Only six countries have officially confirmed more cases than India.
  • Parts of Latin America reopen as crisis deepens: Several nations in the region, including Brazil and Mexico, are easing movement restrictions and allowing more businesses to resume operations, even as cases surge. The World Health Organization's director for the Americas, Dr. Carissa Etienne, warned on Tuesday that countries reopening too quickly "risk a resurgence of Covid-19 that could erase the advantage gained over the past few months."
  • US protest fears: Members of the White House coronavirus task force discussed the "increasing" risk that the virus could spread among protesters at demonstrations over the death of George Floyd in the United States, a source familiar with the discussion said. The US surgeon general said he expects new outbreaks due to the protests.
  • Vaccine hopes: The US should have 100 million doses of one candidate Covid-19 vaccine by the end of the year, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious diseases doctor, said on Tuesday. The plan is to manufacture doses of the vaccine even before it is clear whether it works, he said.
  • South Korea approves virus treatment: The antivirus drug remdesivir can now be imported into the East Asian country. Authorities say the drug has shortened the treatment period for severe cases of Covid-19 in other nations, including the US and Japan.
1:33 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

India's confirmed Covid-19 cases pass 200,000

From CNN's Vedika Sud in New Delhi

A medic handles a sample collected for Covid-19 testing at a booth outside Sharda Hospital in Greater Noida, India.
A medic handles a sample collected for Covid-19 testing at a booth outside Sharda Hospital in Greater Noida, India. Sunil Ghosh/Hindustan Times/Getty Images

India has identified another 8,909 confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus in the past 24 hours -- the most in a single day since the pandemic began -- pushing the nationwide total to 207,615, the country's Ministry of Health and Welfare said.

More than 5,800 people have died in the country after contracting the virus, the ministry said.

India is the seventh country to pass the 200,000 confirmed case threshold, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

The others are:

  • United States (1.8 million)
  • Brazil (555,383)
  • Russia (423,186)
  • United Kingdom (279,392)
  • Spain (239,932)
  • Italy (233,515)
1:24 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Japan reports 52 new coronavirus cases

From CNN's Yoko Wakatsuki in Tokyo

Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike (center) prepares to attend a coronavirus taskforce meeting at the metropolitan government building on June 2.
Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike (center) prepares to attend a coronavirus taskforce meeting at the metropolitan government building on June 2. Kyodo News/Getty Images

Japan’s health ministry said 52 new coronavirus cases were identified in the country on Tuesday -- 34 of which were in Tokyo.

Authorities in the Japanese capital rolled out a new alert system on Tuesday night, in large part due to the spike in cases there. The Tokyo region has recorded 5,283 cases of Covid-19, killing 306 people. 

Total numbers: 17,698 patients have contracted Covid-19 in Japan, 913 of whom have died. Of those, 712 cases and 13 fatalities are tied to the Diamond Princess cruise ship.

1:13 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

South Korea will start importing remdesivir to help treat Covid-19 patients

From CNN's Jake Kwon and John Bonifield

Samples for coronavirus research at the laboratory of the Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany on May 20, where projects include studies on the effectiveness of Remdesivir in clinical application.
Samples for coronavirus research at the laboratory of the Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany on May 20, where projects include studies on the effectiveness of Remdesivir in clinical application. Marcel Kusch/picture alliance via Getty Images

South Korea has approved imports of the antivirus drug remdesivir, the country’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety said in a news release on Wednesday.

Authorities said the decision was made because the drug had meaningfully shortened the treatment period for severe cases of Covid-19 in the United States, Japan and United Kingdom during the pandemic.

Remdesivir has helped speed up recovery in moderately ill patients with pneumonia from Covid-19, drugmaker Gilead Sciences said Monday. Remdesivir is approved to treat Covid-19 in Japan, but is considered an investigational treatment for Covid-19 elsewhere in the world, Gilead said in a statement.

South Korea’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety and its Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) will negotiate with drug importer Gilead Science Korea to import the drug as soon as possible, the release said.  

12:32 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Ethnic minorities in the UK are up to 50% more likely to die from Covid-19 than white people, report finds

From CNN's Sarah Dean and Zamira Rahim

A volunteer walks by coffins at Central Jamia Mosque Ghamkol Sharif in Birmingham, which is operating a temporary morgue during the Covid-19 pandemic.
A volunteer walks by coffins at Central Jamia Mosque Ghamkol Sharif in Birmingham, which is operating a temporary morgue during the Covid-19 pandemic. Jacob King/PA Images/Getty Images

People from the UK's ethnic minority communities are up to 50% more likely to die with coronavirus than their white British peers, a government review has found.

The analysis, conducted by government agency Public Health England (PHE), found that people of Bangladeshi heritage who tested positive for the virus were around twice as likely to die as their white British peers.

People from other minority communities, including those of Chinese, Indian, Pakistani and Caribbean descent, also had a 10% to 50% higher risk of death when compared to white Britons, the report found.

Those from black ethnic groups were also more likely to be diagnosed with Covid-19. The diagnosis rate per 100,000 of the population was 486 for black women and 649 for black men, compared to 220 for white women and 224 for white men.

The document was published Tuesday -- after the UK government denied British media reports that its release had been delayed due to protests in the United States over the killing of George Floyd.

Read more:

12:13 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

US records more than 20,000 new Covid-19 cases

At least 20,461 new Covid-19 cases and 1,015 deaths were reported in the United States on Tuesday, according to Johns Hopkins University.

A total of at least 1,831,821 infections, including 106,181 virus-related fatalities, have now been recorded nationwide.

The totals includes cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases. 

More than 373,000 cases and nearly 30,000 deaths have been reported in New York state, the epicenter of the US epidemic.

CNN is tracking US coronavirus cases here:

11:58 p.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Mexico and parts of Brazil reopen after lockdown -- despite surging coronavirus cases

From CNN's Matt Rivers, Natalie Gallón, Rodrigo Pedroso and Zamira Rahim

People attend a mass at the Nossa Senhora das Dores Church in Porto Alegre, in southern Brazil, after the city eased measures taken to curb the spread of the coronavirus pandemic on May 29.
People attend a mass at the Nossa Senhora das Dores Church in Porto Alegre, in southern Brazil, after the city eased measures taken to curb the spread of the coronavirus pandemic on May 29. Silvio Avila/AFP/Getty Images

Some Latin America nations are partially reopening this week, despite still recording thousands of coronavirus deaths and infections.

In Brazil: Non-essential businesses were allowed to reopen Tuesday in the huge coastal city of Rio de Janeiro.

Churches, car shops and furniture and decoration stores were all permitted to open, while people are now allowed to exercise along the city's famous promenade and swim in the ocean. The easing of restrictions marks the beginning of six phases of reopening planned by officials.

Brazil has the second highest number of Covid-19 cases globally, having recorded more than 555,000 instances of the disease. Cases across the country multiplied by five across the month of May, according to Brazil's health ministry.

In Mexico: Several sectors of the economy reopened on Monday, including the mining, construction and tourist industries.

Mexico's newly reported cases and deaths continue to rise. The country recorded at least 3,891 new Covid-19 patients on Tuesday -- the highest number of cases identified in a single day since the pandemic began.

The country has recorded more than 97,000 cases of the disease, yet officials have pushed ahead with easing the lockdown with a plan dubbed the "new normal."

Read more:

11:35 p.m. ET, June 2, 2020

NASA and Fitbit have received FDA approval for ventilators designed to help Covid-19 patients

From CNN's Jen Christensen

VITAL is a new high-pressure ventilator developed by NASA and tailored to treat coronavirus patients.
VITAL is a new high-pressure ventilator developed by NASA and tailored to treat coronavirus patients. NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA and Fitbit received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday for their ventilators designed to help Covid-19 patients. 

NASA’s design, dubbed the VITAL (Ventilator Intervention Technology Accessible Locally), is a temporary piece of equipment that uses an internal compressor and is meant to last three to four months.

Because the VITAL runs on parts that are not typically in the medical device supply chain it shouldn’t have any impact on need for supplies for current ventilators.

The FDA also added the Fitbit Flow to its list of authorized ventilators. The device, which has quietly been in the works for some time, is a continuous respiratory support system that also includes an FDA-approved manual resuscitator as part of the machine.

The company calls it a “a high-quality, easy-to-use, and low-cost automatic resuscitator that is designed for emergency ventilation.”

“COVID-19 has challenged all of us to push the boundaries of innovation and creativity, and use everything at our disposal to more rapidly develop products that support patients and the healthcare systems caring for them,” said Fitbit CEO James Park.
“We saw an opportunity to rally our expertise in advanced sensor development, manufacturing, and our global supply chain to address the critical and ongoing need for emergency ventilators and help make a difference in the fight against this global virus.”