June 1 coronavirus news

By Joshua Berlinger, Adam Renton and Emma Reynolds, CNN

Updated 9:58 PM ET, Mon June 1, 2020
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1:20 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

No new Covid-19 deaths reported in Spain

From CNN’s Al Goodman and Ingrid Formanek

Dr. Fernando Simón, Spain’s director of the Center for Health Emergencies, holds a press conference on the latest developments of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak in Madrid, Spain on March 11.
Dr. Fernando Simón, Spain’s director of the Center for Health Emergencies, holds a press conference on the latest developments of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak in Madrid, Spain on March 11. Burak Akbulut/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

No new Covid-19 deaths were registered by Spain’s Health Ministry on Sunday, new data released on Monday shows.

The total Covid-19 death toll holds steady for a second day, at 27,127 since the start of the pandemic in Spain.

“The positive statistic is that we do not have any notification of deaths that occurred yesterday,” said Dr. Fernando Simón, Spain’s director of the Center for Health Emergencies.

Speaking at the government’s daily coronavirus briefing, Simón said 15 out of Spain’s 17 regions reported between zero and two deaths over the last week.

The Health Ministry did report a rise of 79 new Covid-19 cases on Sunday, bringing the cumulative total to 239,638.

Asked about reported parties that exceeded the sanctioned number of people allowed to socialize, where infections were detected, Simón responded by saying “these things worry me.” 

Simón said that localized reemergence cases of coronavirus in Spain are “controlled” due to the tracing and diagnosis by health authorities. However, he said he fears that activities, such as a drinking party attended by several hundred young people over the weekend in a small town south of Madrid, could constitute other points of the virus re-emerging.

12:53 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

The Americas are seeing a rapid increase in coronavirus cases, WHO says

From CNN’s Amanda Watts

Nurses wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) work at at Regional Hospital of Loreto Felipe Arriola Iglesias in Iquitos, Peru, on May 20.
Nurses wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) work at at Regional Hospital of Loreto Felipe Arriola Iglesias in Iquitos, Peru, on May 20. Stringer/Getty Images

The Americas, especially Latin America and the Caribbean, are seeing a rapid increase in the number of new coronavirus cases, the World Health Organization said Monday.

“Five of the 10 countries worldwide reporting the highest new number of cases in the past 24 hours are in the Americas: Brazil, USA, Peru, Chile and Mexico,” said Dr. Mike Ryan, WHO executive director of Health Emergencies Program.

The countries reporting the biggest increases in new numbers: Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Peru, Mexico, Haiti, Argentina and Bolivia.  

Ryan said “many many weeks ago” the world was focused on South Asia and Africa as potential hot spots. Now, “to a certain extent, the situation in those two settings are still difficult, but it's stable. Clearly the situation in many South American countries is far from stable. There’s been a rapid increase in cases, and those systems are coming under increasing pressure,” he said.

“I would certainly characterize that Central and South America in particular have very much become the intense zones of transmission for this virus as we speak,” Ryan added.

“And I don't believe that we have reached the peak in that transmission, and at this point, I cannot predict when we will.”

12:46 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

Coronavirus cases in California climb 11% in just five days

From CNN's Cheri Mossburg

A nurse places a blanket over a patient that had just been admitted to the emergency room at Regional Medical Center in San Jose, California on May 21.
A nurse places a blanket over a patient that had just been admitted to the emergency room at Regional Medical Center in San Jose, California on May 21. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

 

As California continues to reopen, coronavirus cases are mounting with an 11% increase over just five days.

Sunday’s report from California Department of Public Health marked yet another single-day high with 3,705 cases.

The total number of confirmed cases in the state is 110,583. That’s an increase of more than 11,000 cases since Wednesday.

The number of coronavirus deaths in California stands at 4,213.

12:36 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

UK records lowest increase in deaths and new infections since end of March

From CNN's Milena Veselinovic

Medics at work in an Intensive Care ward treating coronavirus patients at Frimley Park Hospital, in Camberley, England, on May 22.
Medics at work in an Intensive Care ward treating coronavirus patients at Frimley Park Hospital, in Camberley, England, on May 22. Steve Parsons/Pool/AP

UK has recorded 119 more coronavirus deaths, the lowest daily increase since the stay-at-home order was implemented on March 23, UK Health Secretary Matt Hancock said on Monday. 

Another 1,570 people have been diagnosed with coronavirus, which is also the lowest increase in infections since the end of March, Hancock added.

While these are the lowest figures for deaths and new infections recorded since late March, it's important to note that Monday numbers tend to be lower because of a delay in reporting of data over the weekend.

The total number of people who have died with coronavirus in the UK now stands at 39,045, the health secretary added.

A total of 4.48 million tests have been carried out in the UK since the beginning of the crisis, with 128,437 conducted on Sunday.

"Anyone who needs a test will get a test," Hancock said. 

He added the "we are getting the virus under control," which is why "cautious steps" can be taken to lift some coronavirus restrictions. Hancock added that it's still important to maintain social distancing.

12:13 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

WHO urges US to not end relationship

From CNN Health's Jacqueline Howard

World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus attends a daily press briefing on COVID-19 virus at the WHO headquaters in Geneva, on March 9.
World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus attends a daily press briefing on COVID-19 virus at the WHO headquaters in Geneva, on March 9. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

The World Health Organization on Monday said it hopes President Trump will not follow through with his decision to terminate the relationship between the United States and WHO.

"The world has long benefitted from the strong collaborative engagement with the government and the people of the United States," WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said during a briefing in Geneva on Monday.

"The US government's and its' people's contribution and generosity toward global health over many decades has been immense, and it has made a great difference in public health all around the world," Tedros said. "It is WHO's wish for this collaboration to continue."

On Friday, Trump announced that the US will end its relationship with WHO, a move he has threatened throughout the coronavirus pandemic.

12:00 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

New York governor says mass gatherings "could in fact exacerbate the Covid-19 spread"

From CNN's Kristina Sgueglia

Black Lives Matter protesters kneel in Times Square while marching to honor George Floyd in New York, on May 31.
Black Lives Matter protesters kneel in Times Square while marching to honor George Floyd in New York, on May 31. John Moore/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the "mass gatherings" of protesters "could in fact exacerbate the Covid-19 spread."

Speaking about the progress that the state has made against the coronavirus — going from 800 deaths per day to reopening in 50 days — Cuomo said, "don't snatch defeat from the jaws of victory."

However, Cuomo said its very hard to say to people not to come out because of the pandemic, because he does not want it to be misconstrued with the notion that protesters' concerns are not valid or heard. 

“It’s a very tough balance,” he said adding it is happening on an intense national scale and a the “outpouring of such pain and frustration.”

Similarly, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said earlier that there is a “real danger” that the protests could intensify the spread of the virus “just at a point where we’re starting to beat it back profoundly.”

“I am very worried about the health impact,” de Blasio said.

11:52 a.m. ET, June 1, 2020

Western New York expected to move to Phase 2 of reopening tomorrow, Gov. Cuomo said

Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a daily news conference in New York, on June 1.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a daily news conference in New York, on June 1. State of New York

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he expects the region of Western New York to move to Phase 2 of reopening tomorrow.

"Looks very good," Cuomo said about the region's data.

The governor said a group of "global experts" will go through the data to confirm.

A final announcement is expected later this afternoon.

Cuomo said the Capital region is on track to enter phase 2 on Wednesday.

In Phase 2, businesses considered "more essential" with lower risks of infection to workers and customers will be a priority, Cuomo previously said.

11:52 a.m. ET, June 1, 2020

54 people died in New York yesterday from Covid-19, governor says

Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a daily news conference in New York, on June 1.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a daily news conference in New York, on June 1. State of New York

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that at least 54 people died yesterday in the state from coronavirus.

Noting the continued decline in daily deaths in the state, Cuomo said, "that number is dramatically different than what we were looking at for many many weeks."

He said that hospitalizations, intubations, three day average of new hospitalizations in the state are all down, calling that "really good news."

11:31 a.m. ET, June 1, 2020

Pandemic possibly tied to decline in cancer patients enrolling in clinical trials, new study says

From CNN's Jacqueline Howard

The coronavirus pandemic may be associated with a significant drop in cancer patients participating in clinical trials, especially in areas most affected by Covid-19, a new study suggests.

In an effort to reduce the risk of exposing patients and staff to the novel coronavirus and to preserve resources, some institutions in the United States have pulled back or altogether stopped enrollment in trials, according to the study published in the medical journal JAMA Network Open on Monday.

The study included data on initial enrollments in trials conducted through the SWOG Cancer Research Network between January and April 25. 

The data showed that the number of cancer patients enrolling in trials declined from anywhere between 125 and 150 per week in January, February and early March to only 109 patients in the week of March 15. 

After that, enrollment appeared to go back up just slightly, then down again.

As the pandemic continued, trials in areas with some of the nation's highest numbers of Covid-19 cases were "approximately half as likely" to continue enrolling patients, the researchers from various institutions across the United States wrote in the study.

The study also found that enrollment in trials studying cancer control and prevention decreased more than enrollment in trials studying cancer treatments.

Note on the study: The study had some limitations, including that it only involved data from the SWOG Cancer Research Network - which is 1 of 4 adult National Cancer Institute network groups.

More research is needed to determine whether similar findings would emerge among a larger sample of trials.

So far, "the National Cancer Institute and the US Food and Drug Administration have issued guidance to provide greater flexibility to ensure that patients enrolled in clinical trials are exposed to as little risk as possible during the Covid-19 pandemic," the researchers wrote in the new study.

Those steps include allowing for remote consent and establishing virtual telehealth visits, which are "approaches that may improve the experience of trial participation for patients in the long term," the researchers wrote.