May 2 coronavirus news

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2:21 a.m. ET, May 2, 2020

The World Health Organization congratulates Wuhan for clearing coronavirus cases

From CNN's Anna Kam

Dr. Maria van Kerkhove speaks during a World Health Organization briefing on April 29.
Dr. Maria van Kerkhove speaks during a World Health Organization briefing on April 29. WHO

Dr. Maria van Kerkhove, the technical lead for the WHO’s Health Emergencies Program, has congratulated the Chinese city of Wuhan for having no severe coronavirus cases left.

Wuhan was ground zero for the country's coronavirus outbreak, and was placed under lockdown in January. The lockdown only lifted in April.

“It is welcome news to hear that there are no severe cases from Wuhan. That city has had the hardest hit early on," van Kerkhove said. "Nothing but admiration and thanks for the tireless efforts of the people of Wuhan."

She also praised residents who followed emergency measures and stayed at home.

"We take our hats off to you and thank you for your commitment and service and sharing with us in the world what you have been able to do," she said.

2:00 a.m. ET, May 2, 2020

He came home from hospital to die. His son found a way to keep him alive

From CNN's Tara John

When Suryakant "Suri" Nathwani left hospital, the 81-year-old grabbed his son's hand and pleaded to be allowed to die at home.

"He said, 'Please promise me one thing: If I'm going to go, I'm going to go here. Do not take me back there,'" his son Raj Nathwani said.

Death was not an outcome Raj, 55, was willing to accept -- but he knew his father's chances of surviving coronavirus were not in his favor.

Raj, who had himself recovered from a heart attack last November, was prepared for the pandemic weeks before the UK lockdown began on March 23. He had been in self-isolation alongside his 80-year-old mother and his father, who has chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), since March 11, because the entire household was considered to be at high risk from coronavirus.

But his father's condition began to deteriorate on March 25. Suri's daily 10-minute walk outside the family home turned into a 45-minute stagger. His lung condition was flaring up. He looked fatigued, listless and -- although he did not display the high temperature or persistent cough, which the NHS considered the main symptoms of the virus -- Raj suspected his father had Covid-19.

Raj said he was left with two choices: "Do I keep him (in the hospital) and risk never seeing him again, or do I bring him home and spend all my energy making it comfortable for him?" He chose the latter, even at the risk of spreading the infection through the entire household.

Read the full story about Suri's brush with death and recovery here:

1:41 a.m. ET, May 2, 2020

Singapore to start loosening restrictions next week

A car drives along an otherwise empty road in Singapore's financial district on April 24.
A car drives along an otherwise empty road in Singapore's financial district on April 24. Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

Singapore has announced plans to ease restrictions over the coming weeks, with business to resume more fully from June 1.

"With everyone playing their part and observing safe distancing measures, we have seen a significant decrease in community transmission over the past month," the Ministry of Health said in a statement today.

"That said, we are not out of the woods. There are still unlinked cases in the community and new clusters may form if we let our guard down. We must be cautious in how we lift the restrictions, and put in place further safeguards even as we do so."

Here's how the resumptions will work:

  • Employers and companies will be under stricter requirements to reduce the risk of infection, including staggered working hours, social distancing in the office, and the wearing of face masks.
  • Starting May 5, some residents will be allowed to exercise in common areas like footpaths. Playgrounds, pools, gyms and clubhouses will stay closed.
  • Starting May 12, select services will be allowed to resume operation, including food manufacturing, food delivery and takeaway, laundry services, and hairdressers.

Read more here.

1:25 a.m. ET, May 2, 2020

More than 65,000 people have died from coronavirus in the US

A medical worker in the intensive care unit at MedStar St. Mary's Hospital in Leonardtown, Maryland, on May 1.
A medical worker in the intensive care unit at MedStar St. Mary's Hospital in Leonardtown, Maryland, on May 1. Win McNamee/Getty Images

The United States has at least 1,103,781 reported cases of coronavirus and 65,068 related deaths, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

As states begin to include probable deaths in their counts, so will JHU. As a result, numbers may surge to reflect this change in the upcoming days.

The totals includes cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases and those in the military, veterans hospitals and federal prisons. 

9:02 a.m. ET, May 2, 2020

India reports its biggest single-day jump in new cases

From CNN's Manveena Suri

Health workers put on personal protective equipment before their shift at a Covid-19 check area in Gauhati, India, on May 1.
Health workers put on personal protective equipment before their shift at a Covid-19 check area in Gauhati, India, on May 1. Anupam Nath/AP

India reported 2,293 new cases of coronavirus today -- its biggest single-day increase since the outbreak began, according to the country's Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

That takes the national total to 37,336 cases and 1,218 related deaths, according to the ministry.

All 1.3 billion people in India remain under lockdown. State borders are closed, transportation is suspended, businesses are closed, and people are ordered to stay home.

The lockdown, which left thousands of people stranded away from their home states, was supposed to lift tomorrow. However it has since been extended for another two weeks, although restrictions will be loosened in some low-risk areas.

This post has been updated to correct the total number of cases in India.

12:44 a.m. ET, May 2, 2020

Snapshot of a pandemic: The state of coronavirus around the world

In some countries, the coronavirus is still peaking, with authorities scrambling to respond to spikes in cases and deaths. In others, people are returning to normal life. Here's what the pandemic looks like around the world.

In the US, multiple protests are taking place.

Friday was Labor Day, and employees from various major companies including Amazon and Whole Foods went on strike -- demanding better wages, rent suspensions and government protections for essential workers on the front lines of the pandemic.

Activists participate in a May Day protest in Washington.
Activists participate in a May Day protest in Washington. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

There were also protests on the other side of the spectrum -- people angry about governments ordering beaches and businesses to close. People held rallies in Massachusetts, California, Nevada and other places, calling the mandatory closures "fascism" and "tyranny."

A protester outside the Massachusetts State House in Boston on May 1.
A protester outside the Massachusetts State House in Boston on May 1. Credit: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

In Australia, restrictions have loosened in some states, and the federal government is considering ending the nationwide lockdown early. In Queensland state, residents are now allowed to go out for recreational activities like picnics or boating.

While people are still expected to observe social distancing, residents flocked outdoors today, eager for fresh air after weeks at home.

People walk and skate along the Burleigh Heads foreshore at the Gold Coast, Australia, on May 2.
People walk and skate along the Burleigh Heads foreshore at the Gold Coast, Australia, on May 2. Credit: Chris Hyde/Getty Images

In China, businesses are reopening and people are cautiously resuming normal life. Several of Beijing's most iconic sightseeing spots, like the Forbidden City, also reopened -- albeit with new restrictions, like a cap on daily visitors.

A Chinese tourist wears a face mask in Beijing's Forbidden City on May 1.
A Chinese tourist wears a face mask in Beijing's Forbidden City on May 1. Credit: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

In Spain, authorities are preparing to ease restrictions after seven weeks of a nationwide state of emergency. Most people will be able to do limited sports activities or take short walks every day under the loosened guidelines.

With case numbers slowly going down, Madrid authorities closed an emergency hospital on Friday. The field hospital treated more than 4,000 people during its 41 days of operation.

The Ifema Emergency Hospital is closed on May 1 in Madrid, Spain.
The Ifema Emergency Hospital is closed on May 1 in Madrid, Spain. Credit: Community of Madrid via Getty Images
12:28 a.m. ET, May 2, 2020

Dr. Fauci will testify before the US Senate health committee on May 12

From CNN's Manu Raju

Anthony Fauci attends a coronavirus briefing at the White House on April 9.
Anthony Fauci attends a coronavirus briefing at the White House on April 9. Alex Wong/Getty Images

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the United States' top infectious diseases expert, will testify before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on May 12, per an aide to Committee Chairman Lamar Alexander.  

“Chairman Alexander looks forward to hearing from Dr. Fauci and other administration officials at the Senate health committee’s second hearing back,” the aide said.

Earlier today, CNN reported that the White House had blocked an appearance by Fauci at a House Appropriations Committee hearing next week.

"While the Trump Administration continues its whole-of-government response to COVID-19, including safely opening up America again and expediting vaccine development, it is counter-productive to have the very individuals involved in those efforts appearing at Congressional hearings," White House deputy press secretary Judd Deere said earlier in reference to the House hearing.
"We are committed to working with Congress to offer testimony at the appropriate time."

CNN is asking the White House for comment about the May 12 hearing.

12:04 a.m. ET, May 2, 2020

China reports just one new case and no deaths for fourth straight day

From CNN's Anna Kam in Hong Kong 

Medical staff work inside a testing clinic in Beijing, China, on April 29.
Medical staff work inside a testing clinic in Beijing, China, on April 29. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

China's National Health Commission (NHC) has reported a single new case of the novel coronavirus and no deaths for the fourth consecutive day.

It's a huge drop from the peak of the outbreak, when the country was reporting thousands of new cases a day, and suggests the danger there has mostly passed.

The latest case was imported from abroad, and not a local transmission, the NHC said.

Here's the country breakdown, according to the NHC:

  • Total confirmed infections: 82,875
  • Total deaths: 4,633
  • Total recovered and discharged: 77,685
  • Active cases remaining: 557
11:46 p.m. ET, May 1, 2020

Oprah Winfrey hopes the world becomes more "united" after the pandemic

From CNN's Chloe Melas

Oprah Winfrey speaks on tour on March 7 in Denver, Colorado.
Oprah Winfrey speaks on tour on March 7 in Denver, Colorado. Credit: Tom Cooper/Getty Images

Oprah Winfrey invited fans into her home (virtually) Friday night for a spiritual discussion.

Winfrey kicked off the 24-hour global livestream event called "The Call to Unite," organized in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

Her discussion featured the event's organizer, Timothy Shriver, as well as Bishop T.D. Jakes and Eckhart Tolle, a spiritual leader and bestselling author.

"I've had a lot of time to reflect what this moment means to us as a family and a community," Winfrey said. "In this moment we have an opportunity to take a step forward as a collective consciousness. I am hoping we all come out of this more united ... seeing each other as a part of the whole."

Tolle said: "When you experience adversity in your life, it is even more important to be in the present moment. If you do not, you suffer a lot ... when you move to the present moment you might realize ... there's a lot to be grateful for in this moment."