April 21 coronavirus news

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10:38 p.m. ET, April 20, 2020

BREAKING: Trump temporarily suspending immigration into US

From CNN's Betsy Klein 

US President Donald Trump said late Monday night that he will sign an executive order temporarily suspending immigration to the US, as the nation battles the health and economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic.

He added that the measure was done "in light of the attack from the invisible enemy," or the coronavirus pandemic, and to protect US jobs. 

It's unclear what mechanism Trump will use to suspend immigration and it is also unclear how long such a suspension could last.

CNN has reached out to the White House to find out what the President means, and what effect this will have on the operation of US border crossings, and on those who already hold green cards.

10:29 p.m. ET, April 20, 2020

It's just past 10:30 p.m. in Atlanta and 5:30 a.m in Istanbul. Here's the latest on the pandemic

Officials accompany passengers to conduct a health check-up at Esenboga airport in Ankara, Turkey on April 20.
Officials accompany passengers to conduct a health check-up at Esenboga airport in Ankara, Turkey on April 20. Rasit Aydogan/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The coronavirus pandemic has brought the world to a halt, as countries scramble to contain its impact on health and the economy.

If you're just joining us, here are the latest developments:

  • US deaths could surpass recent modeling: The final death toll could rise above 60,000 if states reopen too quickly, a source close to the White House coronavirus task force warned. The country has reported at least 786,000 cases and more than 42,000 related deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.
  • But states want to reopen: Georgia's governor said certain businesses could reopen as soon as Friday. The governors of Alaska, Tennessee, South Carolina, Illinois, and Louisiana have also said they are considering reopening certain businesses soon -- sparking criticism from other state leaders who warn that the reopening could endanger national health.
  • US stimulus bill: Lawmakers are on the verge of striking a deal on a nearly $500 billion package to extend funding for an emergency small business lending program, provide additional funding for hospitals and more funding for testing.
  • In Turkey, at least 4,674 new coronavirus infections were confirmed within 24 hours. The country will go under a four-day curfew starting tomorrow.
  • In Colombia, the nationwide lockdown will be extended through May 10, though essential services and businesses will remain open.
  • In Guatemala, there have been reports of people being attacked after they return from overseas, particularly those arriving from the US -- even if they test negative . and follow quarantine rules.
10:18 p.m. ET, April 20, 2020

A karate team fled coronavirus in Hong Kong to train for the Olympics -- and got infected in France

From CNN's Sandi Sidhu, Anna Kam, and Jessie Yeung

Lee Chun-ho has been preparing for the Olympics for the past four years. A karate athlete from Hong Kong, he has practiced the martial art all his life, and competed internationally from Madrid to Jordan.

Ahead of Tokyo 2020, karate was made an Olympic competitive category for the first time -- and Lee had his sights set on competing in Japan.

Then the coronavirus pandemic hit, and Covid-19 soon jumped the border from mainland China into Hong Kong.

Not wanting to take any chances, Lee and his team fled to Paris to train. The French capital, they thought, would be a safe haven compared to the chaos unfolding in Asia.

Instead, within a month the virus ripped through France and Europe, infecting Lee and several other team members, including a coach.

With Tokyo 2020 now postponed until next year and their dream put on hold, Lee and his team have returned to Hong Kong, becoming part of the city's second wave of imported cases.

"I cannot explain how upset I was when I got the virus, because the purpose of the Paris training camp was to try and stay away from the virus, to stay focused and train and get ready for the Olympic qualifications," Lee said. "At the end of the day, I got the virus."

Read the full story here:

10:55 p.m. ET, April 20, 2020

Nancy Pelosi: Trump needs to "stop misrepresenting about the testing"

From CNN's Matthew Hoye 

US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.
US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. CNN

US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged President Donald Trump to "stop misrepresenting about the testing" when speaking to CNN's Anderson Cooper tonight.

She criticized the President for not admitting the United States had a problem with coronavirus testing capabilities, saying, "It's never too late to tell the truth. It’s never too late to do the right thing."

On the stimulus bill: Pelosi addressed the ongoing talks on the bill, saying she felt optimistic that lawmakers would come to a conclusion tonight and the bill could be taken up in the Senate tomorrow and in the House on Wednesday.

She claimed the biggest holdups in negotiations have been Republican negotiators' refusal to take into account Democrats' demands on a national policy on testing.

She also said Democrats have been pushing for wording in the measure that guarantees hospitals will receive needed funding.

Republican negotiators finally started to to negotiate on Democratic priorities in the "last 100 hours," she said.

Watch:

 

9:51 p.m. ET, April 20, 2020

Deaths in the US could surpass estimate of 60,000 if states reopen too quickly, source warns

From CNN's Jim Acosta

The number of coronavirus deaths in the US could surpass modeling estimates of 60,000 if some states move too quickly in reopening, a source close to the White House coronavirus task force warns.

"If some states jump prematurely into opening we certainly could surpass 60,000," the source said. 

The source pointed to the governors in South Carolina and Georgia deciding to reopen businesses, even as those states have yet to meet "gating" guidelines laid out by the administration last week. 

"Not good," the source said. 

The gating guidelines determine when states can reopen restaurants, bars, gyms and public spaces, as well as providing guidance for employers.

These criteria include a sustained decrease in cases over a 14-day period and a return to pre-crisis conditions in hospitals.

9:37 p.m. ET, April 20, 2020

Turkey reported more than 4,600 cases in 24 hours

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks during a news conference after a cabinet meeting via videoconferencing in Istanbul, Turkey on April 20.
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks during a news conference after a cabinet meeting via videoconferencing in Istanbul, Turkey on April 20. Murat Kula/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Turkey confirmed at least 4,674 new coronavirus infections in a 24-hour period on Monday -- a spike from previous days where the number of new positive cases hovered around 4,000.

Another 123 Covid-19 deaths were also recorded, according to the Turkish health ministry.

The country has now reported a total of 90,980 cases and 2,140 deaths from Covid-19.

Turkey will be under 4-day curfew, effective from midnight on April 22 local time through April 26, according to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

The country has also started production of locally made ventilators, Erdogan announced, with the first batch already delivered to a newly-built hospital in Istanbul.

9:24 p.m. ET, April 20, 2020

The US has reported more than 784,000 cases

At least 784,599 cases of coronavirus and 42,138 related deaths have been recorded in the United States, according to Johns Hopkins University.

On Monday, the US reported at least 24,859 new cases and 1,417 deaths. 

These totals includes cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as all cases repatriated from overseas.

As states begin to include "probable deaths" in their counts, so will JHU. In the upcoming days, these changes may show as surges of deaths in the United States. 

CNN is tracking US coronavirus cases here:

9:11 p.m. ET, April 20, 2020

Colombia extends coronavirus lockdown to May 10

From CNN's Stefano Pozzebon in Bogota

Health workers pray before going out for coronavirus check-ups in Cali, Colombia, on April 20.
Health workers pray before going out for coronavirus check-ups in Cali, Colombia, on April 20. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

Colombia is extending its coronavirus lockdown through May 10, President Ivan Duque said Monday.

In an address to the nation, Duque said that essential businesses such as grocery stores, banks and local transport will remain open, but borders will stay shut and commercial flights will only resume in June.

Other economic sectors may be allowed to return to operate before May 11, depending on how the health situation evolves, Duque said.

Duque acknowledged the economic damage caused by the shutdown, but said that these emergency measures were aimed at strengthening the country’s health system. 

"We cannot let uncertainty shake us as a society", he said. 

More than 77% of Colombia's workforce is currently out of work and without welfare protection, Duque's vice president Marta Lucia Ramirez said on Sunday. 

As of today, Colombia has reported 3,977 coronavirus cases, including 189 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

9:00 p.m. ET, April 20, 2020

Guatemala president denounces attacks on people returning from abroad

From CNN's Daniel Silva Fernandez in Miami and Maija Ehlinger in Atlanta

Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei delivers a speech to lawmakers in Guatemala City, on Wednesday, March 18.
Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei delivers a speech to lawmakers in Guatemala City, on Wednesday, March 18. Moises Castillo/AP

Guatemala President Alejandro Giammattei denounced several reported attacks on people returning to Guatemala from overseas, particularly those arriving from the United States.

During a government news conference Sunday, Giammattei asked Guatemalans to treat these people not as "criminals" but rather as "brothers."

Giammattei mentioned a case reported on Saturday, in the municipality of Santa Catarina Palopó, where people "tried to attack the mayor, his family and a person who had returned to his home."

The person who returned from abroad had attained the proper paperwork demonstrating they had tested negative for coronavirus and had followed all necessary quarantine measures, Giammattei said.

This comes after his announcement last week that deportation flights into Guatemala were to be suspended after a CDC mission in the country found several positive cases that had recently returned to the country. 

Giammattei also stressed that many of those returning to Guatemala had been sending back remittances to family members only months prior to the pandemic.