April 10 coronavirus news

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9:52 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Singapore suspends use of Zoom for online schooling after security concerns

From Eric Cheung in Hong Kong

Singapore has announced the suspension of Zoom for in home-based learning after a security breach was found, the Ministry of Education said in a statement Friday.

Aaron Loh, divisional director of the Educational Technology Division, said the ministry has been made aware of a number of "very serious incidents" involving the use of Zoom, and has decided to suspend the software to ensure online security.

 "We are already working with Zoom to enhance its security settings and make these security measures clear and easy to follow," he said. "As a precautionary measure, our teachers will suspend their use of Zoom until these security issues are ironed out."

Zoom said in a statement it was "deeply upset" to learn about the security breaches and added it has recently changed its settings to increase online security. 

"Zoom is committed to providing educators with the tools and resources they need on a safe and secure platform, and we are continuing to engage with all of our users on how they can best use Zoom and protect their meetings," according to the statement.

Earlier this month, Singapore moved to home-based learning across all levels of schooling to combat the spread of the virus.

9:48 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Defense secretary says another 300 military personnel will deploy to help NYC hospitals

Secretary of Defense Mark Esper speaks at a press conference at the Pentagon on March 5.
Secretary of Defense Mark Esper speaks at a press conference at the Pentagon on March 5. Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary of Defense Mark Esper says the military is sending another 300 medical personnel to help New York City hospitals. 

Appearing on CBS “This Morning” Esper said, "we've deployed to 11 New York City hospitals 350 doctors, nurses and respiratory therapists and today we will be deploying another 300 to help those local hospital workers who've been struggling mightily to keep on top of the (coronavirus) cases help them out provide them some additional relief from the Department of Defense".

CNN reported earlier this week that DoD would be “flooding the area with medical teams.” 

The Pentagon said Tuesday that 325 military medical personnel have arrived in New York and would start embedding in 11 public hospitals on Wednesday.

The deployment of military medical personnel directly to hospitals represents a recent change in tactics for the Defense Department. At first the military wanted to transfer equipment to the civilians and stay largely out of the way. Then it agreed to do overflow and non-coronavirus patients, then coronavirus overflow and now hundreds of military doctors are surging on the frontlines in New York-area hospitals.  

9:49 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

New York state has more coronavirus cases than any other country

From CNN's Amanda Watts

The state of New York has more cases than any other country in the world, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.

New York is reporting 161,807 coronavirus cases according to a tally by JHU.  

Spain (No. 2), the country with the second most coronavirus cases behind the US, has 157,022 cases. Italy (No. 3) is reporting 143,626 cases. France (No. 4) and Germany (No. 5) are both reporting more than 118,000 cases, according to tallies by JHU. 

10:00 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

At least 50 New York MTA employees have died from coronavirus

From CNN’s Taylor Romine

A Metropolitan Transportation Authority worker wears a face mask at the Grand Army Plaza station in Brooklyn, New York, on April 7.
A Metropolitan Transportation Authority worker wears a face mask at the Grand Army Plaza station in Brooklyn, New York, on April 7. Frank Franklin II/AP

At least 50 Metropolitan Transportation Authority employees have died from coronavirus, MTA Chair and CEO Pat Foye said in a radio interview on WBCS 880 this morning. 

At least 5,200 of 25,000 MTA employees are under quarantine — down from 6,000 as previously reported by the MTA, he said.

Nearly 1,900 employees have tested positive for Covid-18, up from 1,571 people, as previously reported. 

Ridership continues to decline, Foye said. As of Thursday, New York City subway ridership is down 93%, Long Island Rail Road is down 93% and Metro North is down 95%.

Bridge and tunnel traffic is down by about two-thirds.

9:26 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Chicago mayor: "No one should be locked up if they're not a danger to the community or flight risk"

From CNN's Adrienne Vogt

The largest known concentration of coronavirus cases outside of hospitals is in Chicago’s Cook County Jail, where at least 276 detainees and 172 staff members have tested positive for the virus

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot says that while the jurisdiction of the jail doesn’t fall under the city, but with the county, Chicago officials have been providing public health assistance. 

"First and foremost, no one should be locked up if they're not a danger to the community or flight risk and certainly not because they can't afford to pay bail," Lightfoot said. "But what we have been doing is giving guidance to the sheriff about decompressing the dorm-like setting that exists in the jail." 

Lightfoot also addressed racial disparity among those affected by the virus. About 70% of the deaths in Chicago have been in the African-American community, according to the city's Department of Health.  

"We put together a racial equity rapid response team that is a compendium of public health experts, medical doctors, social workers nurses, and street outreach folks, folks normally out there trying to interrupt violence but have deep roots and connection into these neighborhoods," she said. 

Lightfoot encourages finding local, credible sources to get updates on the coronavirus, slamming President Trump’s remarks on the pandemic. 

"What we have seen coming out of the President's mouth and his daily press conferences is a series of half-truths, myths, it is not grounded in facts or science," she said. "And it is terrible because the President of the United States has the loudest megaphone in the world and people want to be relying upon the things he says or does, but unfortunately, you can't do that with this President."

Lightfoot said residents should stay home while celebrating Easter and Passover, even as the city starts to see a flattening of the curve.

"This is deadly serious. And you can express your faith in lots of different ways, but it can’t be by congregating," she said.

9:29 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Spain is "not yet in de-escalation phase," health minister warns

From CNN’s Vasco Cotovio and Tim Lister

Spanish Health Minister Salvador Illa attends a plenary session in Madrid, Spain, on April 9 during a national lockdown to prevent the spread of Covid-19.
Spanish Health Minister Salvador Illa attends a plenary session in Madrid, Spain, on April 9 during a national lockdown to prevent the spread of Covid-19. Mariscal/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Spain's health minister warned that the country is not in a "de-escalation phase" even as his government prepares measures to slowly end the current movement restrictions in place to tackle the novel coronavirus outbreak.

“Spain continues in a state of lockdown,” Salvador Illa said during a press conference following a meeting of the Spanish cabinet. “We are not yet in a de-escalation phase, Spain is not yet in a de-escalation phase”. 

A reduced number of so called "non-essential" workers who have been off for two weeks, from certain sectors, such as construction, will be allowed return to work on Monday. Trains and other public transport will slowly start ramping up their operation, but the health minister called on all those who could, to continue working from home.

Those returning to work on Monday will have to follow strict social distancing rules, Illa said.

“It is very important to maintain a social distance of a minimum of one meter, preferably of two meters, during your commute to work,” he said, adding the same measures need to be guaranteed in work places and any “business that is open to the public.”

 Illa went on to say that Spain has been able to “slow down the pandemic," reducing the rate of infection and the climb in the number of deaths due to Covid-19.

“The data shows that we are meeting our objectives, but we remain in an important phase of the pandemic,” he said, warning that contagion is still taking place and new cases continue to be diagnosed.

9:18 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Another detainee dies at Cook County Jail in Chicago after testing positive for Covid-19

From CNN's Brad Parks

A sign pleading for help hangs in a window at the Cook County Jail in Chicago, Illinois, on April 9.
A sign pleading for help hangs in a window at the Cook County Jail in Chicago, Illinois, on April 9. Scott Olson/Getty Images

A second detainee who tested positive for Covid-19 has died at Cook County Jail in Chicago, officials said today.

The 51-year-old inmate was pronounced dead last evening at St. Anthony’s Hospital. Preliminary reports indicate he died as the result of complications due to the virus. An autopsy is pending according to a statement the sheriff’s office. The prisoner had been hospitalized since April 3 and is the second person in custody who has died after testing positive for the virus at the jail.

"Everything Sheriff's officers and county medical professionals have done since before the virus started spreading in the Chicago area was in an effort to prevent the loss of life to this deadly virus,” the Cook County Sherriff’s Office said in a statement. “We will continue to work round-the-clock to aggressively combat the spread of COVID-19."

A federal judge yesterday denied a motion to order the immediate release of medically vulnerable detainees at the Cook County Jail to prevent the further spread of Covid-19.

As of yesterday evening, there were 276 detainees in custody at the jail who have tested positive for COVID-19. Of those, 21 were being treated at local hospitals and 36 others had been moved to a recovery facility. At least 219 were being treated and monitored by Cermak Health Services, a division of Cook County Health and Hospitals System, for mild-to-moderate symptoms.

9:02 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Fauci: We're seeing "some favorable signs" that the curve is flattening

From CNN's Gisela Crespo

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said officials are seeing "some favorable signs" that coronavirus curve may be flattening in the United States. 

During an appearance on CNN's "New Day," he was asked if he thought if social distancing guidelines should be relaxed by May 1. Fauci said "the virus kind of decides whether or not it's going to be appropriate to open or not."  

"What we're seeing right now are some favorable signs as I've discussed with you a few times on this show," Fauci explained. “It's looking like that in many cases, particularly in New York. We're starting to see a flattening and a turning around." 

Fauci added that prior to re-opening the country, he would like to see a "clear indication" that reported cases are going down. 

"One thing you don't want to do is you don't want to get out there prematurely and then wind up — you're back in the same situation," Fauci told CNN's Alisyn Camerota. "We're looking for the kinds of things that would indicate that we can go forward in a gradual way to essentially reopen the country to a more normal way." 

Watch more:

8:42 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Unclaimed coronavirus victims may be buried on New York's Hart Island, as the state's death toll climbs

From CNN's Mark Morales and Laura Ly

Bodies are buried on New York's Hart Island on April 9, where the Department of Corrections is dealing with more burials amid the coronavirus pandemic.
Bodies are buried on New York's Hart Island on April 9, where the Department of Corrections is dealing with more burials amid the coronavirus pandemic. John Minchillo/AP

New York officials say that Hart Island, which for decades has been used as the final resting place for those who died unclaimed, will now also be used for unclaimed coronavirus victims.

"It is likely that people who have passed away from (coronavirus).... will be buried on the island in the coming days," New York City Mayor Press Secretary Freddi Goldstein told CNN.

Drone pictures on Thursday showed bodies being buried on the island.

The move comes as New York continues to respond to its devastating coronavirus outbreak. More than 161,000 cases and 7,067 deaths have been reported in the state, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Hart Island has been used by the city as a public cemetery for over 150 years and is managed by the Department of Corrections. The Hart island burials are mostly people who have been unclaimed at the city's morgue for anywhere from 30 to 60 days, Goldstein said.

Over one million people are interred there. The city is transferring unclaimed bodies to Hart Island to make way for other coronavirus victims whose bodies will be claimed, Goldstein said. New rules from the medical examiner's office say bodies will be taken to the island if they go unclaimed for two weeks.

Only people who have not been claimed by relatives or a loved will be buried there, Goldstein highlighted. Despite the new rule from the medical examiner, Goldstein said as long as morgue officials make contact with a relative within 14 days, they will not be moved to Hart Island.

"These are people who, for two weeks, we have not been able to find anyone who says 'I know that person I love that person I will handle the burial,'" Goldstein said. "These are people who we have made zero contact with the family."

Usually, about 25 people are buried on the island each week, Goldstein said. But since coronavirus began claiming victims in the US, she said there are 25 people buried there each day.