April 10 coronavirus news

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8:40 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Fauci: There might be "merit" to the idea of coronavirus immunity certificates

From CNN's Gisela Crespo

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens during a briefing about the coronavirus at the White House on April 7.
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens during a briefing about the coronavirus at the White House on April 7. Alex Brandon/AP

Dr. Anthony Fauci said Friday on CNN's "New Day" the idea of Americans carrying certificates of immunity to prove they have tested positive for the antibodies to the coronavirus might "have some merit under certain circumstances." 

 Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told CNN's Alisyn Camerota immunity certificates are being discussed.

"It's one of those things that we talk about when we want to make sure that we know who the vulnerable people are and not," he said

Fauci added that these antibody tests will be important for medical workers and others on the frontline who are fighting the current pandemic.

"If their antibody test is positive, one can formulate strategies about whether or not they would be at risk or vulnerable to getting re-infected. This would be important for health care workers, for first-line fighters," he said.

8:06 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Fauci says antibody tests will be available in the US within "a week or so"

From CNN's Adrienne Vogt

Top infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci says antibody tests, which show who has already been infected with the coronavirus, will be available soon. 

“Within a period of a week or so, we're going to have a rather large number of tests that are available,” Fauci told CNN’s Alisyn Camerota. 

Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases, said testing of people who currently have the coronavirus and antibody tests will be done in parallel.

Fauci also said the prospect of Americans carrying certificates of immunity to prove they have tested positive for the antibodies to the coronavirus might "have some merit under certain circumstances." Immunity certificates are being discussed in the White House coronavirus task force meetings, Fauci said.

"It's one of those things that we talk about when we want to make sure that we know who the vulnerable people are and not."

Fauci declined to give a concrete date when the US can reopen businesses and begin to relax restrictions. “The virus kind of decides whether or not it's going to be appropriate to open or not,” he said. “I would want to see a clear indication that you are very, very clearly and strongly going in the right direction. Because the one thing you don't want to do is you don't want to get out there prematurely and wind up back in the same situation,” he added.

Fauci said that Americans should still practice social distancing guidelines during Passover and Easter. He predicted there will be many deaths in the next week, but “deaths tend to lag behind what the driving elements of the outbreak are,” and there should be fewer hospitalizations and intubations. 

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8:02 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Boris Johnson "just beginning his recovery" from coronavirus

From CNN's Luke McGee

St Thomas' Hospital in London, where British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is being treated for coronavirus, is pictured on April 10.
St Thomas' Hospital in London, where British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is being treated for coronavirus, is pictured on April 10. Matt Dunham/AP

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson is “just beginning his recovery” from Covid-19 and continues to be in “very good spirits” after being moved out of the intensive care ward, his official spokesman said Friday.

Johnson will be taking the advice from his medical team, the spokesman said, but will not be going to the Prime Minister’s countryside retreat Chequers.

The Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab will continue to stand in for Johnson, who entered intensive care on Monday and left the unit on Thursday.

7:43 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Spain working on introducing a universal basic income

From CNN’s Vasco Cotovio in London

Shuttered businesses are seen on a street in Malaga, Spain, during lockdown on April 4.
Shuttered businesses are seen on a street in Malaga, Spain, during lockdown on April 4. Jesus Merida/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images

The Spanish Government is working to introduce a preliminary version of a universal basic income as soon as possible, to help Spaniards face the economic fallout of the novel coronavirus outbreak in the country. 

“This [health] crisis has placed on the table the urgency of a universal basic income, that it is essential and fundamental to guarantee dignity and a minimum purchase power for many Spanish families that are in a desperate situation,” the second deputy Spanish Prime Minister, Pablo Iglesias, said in an interview with national broadcaster TVE on Friday.

“There are people who cannot take advantage of unemployment benefits or furloughs. There are people that have difficulties, today, to go to the supermarket and buy the essential products their family need.”

“It is essential and fundamental to help families that are in a desperate situation,” Iglesias, who is also the Minister for Social Rights, added.

Second deputy Spanish Prime Minister Pablo Iglesias, right, attends a legislative session alongside Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez in Madrid, Spain, on March 25.
Second deputy Spanish Prime Minister Pablo Iglesias, right, attends a legislative session alongside Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez in Madrid, Spain, on March 25. Mariscal/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

According to reports in Spanish media, this temporary universal basic income would be of around $550 (€500) per month.

Iglesias went on to say it could take a few months to implement a proper universal basic income system in a country such as Spain, which has different benefit systems across each region, so the government in Madrid will put forward plan that will serve as a “bridge” in the meantime. 

“This is an urgent matter that we in government are working on and that we hope we can implement as soon as possible,” Iglesias said. “This ‘bridge’ universal basic income is essential.” 

Spain has previously announced a €200 billion ($216 billion) aid package, amounting to about 20% of the country's GDP, as it tackles the economic impact of its coronavirus outbreak -- the deadliest anywhere in Europe.

The nation registered an increase in unemployment of 302,265 people in March compared to the previous month, according to Spanish Labor Ministry data.

7:31 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

French aircraft carrier has 50 confirmed coronavirus cases on board

From Fanny Bobille in Paris

The French aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle enters the port of Brest, France on March 13.
The French aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle enters the port of Brest, France on March 13. Fred Tanneau/AFP/Getty Images

France's flagship aircraft carrier the Charles de Gaulle has 50 confirmed coronavirus cases on board, the French Defense Ministry said in a statement Friday. 

"The results of the 66 tests carried out concluded that there were 50 cases of COVID-19 on board the Charles de Gaulle. No worsening of the health of the seamen on board is currently noted. In addition, three seamen were evacuated as a precautionary measure on the morning of 9 April," the statement read.

A medical team arrived on board on April 8, according to the Defense Ministry.

The flagship carrier is in the Atlantic, with an anticipated return to the French city of Toulon on April 23.

7:00 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

The meaning behind your strange coronavirus dreams

From CNN's Kristen Rogers

If you've been having bizarre dreams during the pandemic, you're not alone.

Those who are sharing their #pandemicdreams on Twitter are either amazed at the peculiarity of their dreams or distressed by plots that center on death, fear and strange new worlds.

"In my dream, I called an Uber, but a hearse showed up instead. Not liking these #pandemicdreams," posted Sarah Schachner on Twitter on March 23.

According to experts, these cryptic responses are normal. Our brains' way of understanding the stressful information we take in during the day can manifest in nightmares.

Or we might dream of past chapters in life that were less stressful.

"This [pandemic] is something that they've never experienced before," said sleep medicine expert Dr. Meir Kryger, professor of pulmonary medicine and clinical professor of nursing at Yale School of Medicine.

"And it's possible that their brains are trying to find a time when things weren't like that. It's like when sometimes people are trying to fall asleep and they can't turn their minds off. They will try to think about a time when things were better."

Read more here

6:49 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Hungary slows spread of coronavirus but "real test" has yet to come, says PM Orban

From CNN's Lauren Kent in London

Police officers patrol during lockdown in Budapest, Hungary, on April 3.
Police officers patrol during lockdown in Budapest, Hungary, on April 3. Marton Monus/MTI/AP

Hungary's restrictions on movement have slowed the spread of coronavirus but the "real test" has yet to come, Prime Minister Viktor Orban said on Friday in an interview with state broadcaster Kossuth Radio.

According to the Hungarian Government website, "[Orban] said he regards the containment effort as successful in as much as that they have slowed down the spread of the epidemic, and as a result, they have gained time. However, 'the great trial, the real test is yet to come.'" 

"In the context of the epidemic, Mr Orban also said he can see that there are countries which are “already heading towards the exit”; however, in Hungary he 'cannot yet see the light at the end of the tunnel.'"

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban is pictured on a laptop in a flat in Budapest, as he makes an announcement on April 9.
Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban is pictured on a laptop in a flat in Budapest, as he makes an announcement on April 9. Attila Kisbenedek/AFP/Getty Images

Orban said when infections peak in Hungary, the nation will need about 8,000 intensive care beds and ventilators, adding that in "peace time" Hungary has about 2,000 ventilators. 

The populist leader was last week given powers to rule by decree after a vote in Hungary's Parliament, a move criticized by international human rights watchdogs.

Hungary has 1,190 confirmed cases of coronavirus, including 77 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

6:42 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Spain's cases and deaths are slowing down

A member of hospital cleaning staff disinfects a room after a patient died at the Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, near Barcelona, Spain, on April 9.
A member of hospital cleaning staff disinfects a room after a patient died at the Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, near Barcelona, Spain, on April 9. David Ramos/Getty Images

Spain has recorded another 605 deaths from coronavirus in the past day, a stark toll that nonetheless shows that the country's outbreak is slowing.

Spain's daily death toll rose by 4% on Friday, the lowest increase recorded since the virus arrived in Spain. The increase was 4.7% on Thursday.

“We have reached the peak and now the de-escalation begins," Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said in Parliament on Thursday.

The total number of deaths in the country is now 15,843, data from the Spanish Health Ministry released on Friday shows.

The number of active cases rose from 85,043 to 85,511 -- an increase of 468, the lowest since March 11.

Despite the progress, Spain extended its state of emergency until at least April 26 on Thursday. "The last thing we should allow is a step backwards," Sanchez said in a near-empty Parliament, warning that relaxing measures could cause the virus to "rebound."

5:45 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

The EU has bungled its response to coronavirus and it might never fully recover

Analysis by CNN's Luke McGee

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen speaks during a media conference at EU headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, on April 2.
European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen speaks during a media conference at EU headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, on April 2. Francois Lenoir/Pool/AP

The pace at which Covid-19 spread around the globe left governments and international institutions paralyzed. But few experienced the scale of the whiplash currently being felt in Brussels.

The European Union began this year reinvigorated, having seen off the threat of Brexit with a unity of purpose that typically eludes it when faced with such existential challenges. Its new leadership team, under Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, was fired up with a vision for the EU as a global leader in climate sustainability and democratic standards.

What a difference a few months and a global pandemic make. The only issue world leaders have the capacity to deal with right now has dragged the EU back into the quicksand of its own dysfunction.

From a sluggish political response to the crisis to bitter internal rows about how to mitigate the economic effects of coronavirus, member states have turned against one another, and in on themselves.

On Tuesday night, Mauro Ferrari -- the EU's chief scientist -- resigned from his position at the head of the European Research Council. In a statement to the Financial Times, Ferrari described his frustration at the EU's handling of the coronavirus outbreak.

"I have been extremely disappointed by the European response to Covid-19 ... I arrived at the ERC a fervent supporter of the EU [but] the Covid-19 crisis completely changed my views."

He's not alone in thinking the EU's immediate reaction to the crisis had been slow off the mark. "From day one, the EU was fighting an uphill struggle, as it rushed to piece together a pan-European response to a healthcare crisis with no real authority to do so," says Andrea Renda, a senior research fellow at the Centre for European Policy Studies.

Read more here.