Live Updates

Day 3 of the 2021 G7 Summit

Queen Elizabeth II greets the Bidens at Windsor Castle
05:01

What we covered here

  • G7 summit in the UK: Leaders gathered in Cornwall for the last day of the G7, which represents some of the world’s major economies — Britain, France, Germany, the US, Italy, Japan and Canada.
  • Meeting’s outcome: G7 nations pledged over one billion Covid-19 vaccine doses for the rest of the world and called for a new study into the origins of the virus, including in China.
  • A meeting with the queen: Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II welcomed US President Joe Biden and the first lady at Windsor Castle.

Our live coverage has ended for the day. You can read more about the G7 here.

39 Posts

President Biden lands in Brussels ahead of Monday's NATO summit

US President Joe Biden arrives aboard the Air Force One at Melsbroek Military Airport in Brussels, on June 13, ahead of the Nato Summit and EU-US summit.

President Biden has just landed in Brussels where he’ll attend the 31st Summit of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) on Monday.

He’s set to affirm the US’ commitment to the transatlantic security and collective defense as NATO leaders discuss how to address future threats and “effective burden sharing,” according to the White House.

Biden is also expected to meet with Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at the summit.

Watch Biden’s arrival:

03:01

Biden describes queen as "extremely gracious," says she reminds him of his mother

US President Joe Biden and Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle on June 13, in Windsor, England.

President Biden described Queen Elizabeth as an “extremely gracious” woman who reminds him of his mother after meeting her at Windsor Castle. 

“We had a great talk,” he said. 

He said she wanted to know about Vladimir Putin, whom Biden will meet next week, and Xi Jinping, the Chinese president. 

Speaking at Heathrow Airport before departing the UK, Biden said he wished he could have spoken to the Queen for longer. 

“She was very generous,” Biden said. He said he did not think she’d be insulted if he said she “reminded me of my mother in terms of the look of her and the generosity.”

Biden said they compared notes on living in Windsor Castle versus the White House. She noted the end of the castle they met on is private, while the other end allows public visitors. 

Asked if he’d invited her to the White House, Biden said he had. 

He was speaking before departing the United Kingdom after four nights in the country. He attended the G7 summit, met for one-on-one talks with at least four leaders and held a private audience with Queen Elizabeth II. 

Before boarding Air Force One, the President spoke for a while on the tarmac with some guests and then bid farewell to the first lady, who is returning to Washington. 

“Take good care of her,” he called out to Yael Lempert, the current top US diplomat in London. 

The Bidens depart Windsor castle

US President Joe Biden and Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle on June 13, in Windsor, England.

President Joe Biden and the first lady have just left Windsor Castle after meeting with the Queen. They were inside together for roughly an hour.

Biden became the 12th sitting president to meet the Queen during her reign, joining a legacy of American leaders paying their respects to a global icon and living piece of history. Biden is the fifth president the Queen has hosted at Windsor and it was among her first public engagements since her husband, Prince Philip, died at 99 earlier this year.

The Bidens will now head to Brussels for the 31st Summit of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) on Monday.

President Biden and first lady are meeting with the Queen inside Windsor Castle

Queen Elizabeth II stands for a photo with US President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden in the Grand Corridor during their visit to Windsor Castle in England on June 13.

US President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden are meeting now with Queen Elizabeth II inside of Windsor Castle, after the conclusion of the G7 summit.  

To welcome the Bidens, the Queen treated them to an honor guard formed of the Grenadier Guards in the castle’s famous quad and the US National Anthem was played. 

The US President also inspected the troops and then rejoined the Queen and first lady to watch the military march-past.

On Sunday, Biden became the 12th sitting president to meet the Queen during her reign, joining a legacy of American leaders paying their respects to a global icon and living piece of history. Biden is the fifth president the Queen has hosted at Windsor.

Today’s meeting is the Queen’s first one-on-one engagement with a world leader since the coronavirus pandemic began. And it’s among her first public engagements since her husband, Prince Philip, died at 99 earlier this year.

Biden wears signature sunglasses to meet the Queen at Windsor Castle

US President Joe Biden met Queen Elizabeth II on Sunday, arriving at Windsor Castle for a formal audience alongside his wife. He is the thirteenth American president to meet the Queen, and the twelfth during her reign.

The Bidens arrived into the interior courtyard in the back of a dark Range Rover, seated alongside the first lady.

Biden, wearing his signature aviator sunglasses, stepped from the car and waited for his wife before ascending two steps to the platform where the Queen was standing.

The first couple stood talking to the Queen for a few moments before turning to face a cordon of red-uniformed Grenadier Guards wearing bearskin hats. He did not remove his sunglasses as the American national anthem played.

Biden then stepped off of the platform to take a walking survey of the guards.

Biden inspects the troops as part of welcome ceremony at Windsor Castle

US President Joe Biden is accompanying the officer commanding the honor guard, Major James Taylor, and Major General Christopher Ghika, to inspect the troops, before returning to the dais to watch the military march past alongside the Queen and first lady.

It’s part of his welcome ceremony as he meets with Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor castle.

Afterward, the group will head into the castle for their meeting.

See the moment:

01:14

NOW: Queen Elizabeth II welcomes President Biden and first lady at Windsor Castle with arrival ceremony

Queen Elizabeth II stands with US President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden at Windsor Castle in England on June 13.

US President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden just arrived at Windsor Castle to meet with Queen Elizabeth II.

Her Majesty is welcoming the President and the First Lady at the dais in the Quadrangle of Windsor Castle. Upon the President and the first lady’s arrival, an honor guard formed of The Queen’s Company First Battalion Grenadier Guards will give a Royal Salute, and the US National Anthem will be played.

The President will then inspect the troops before rejoining the Queen and first lady to watch the military march-past. Afterward, the group will head into the castle for their meeting.

The Queen has hosted four other presidents at Windsor: Trump in 2018; Obama in 2016; George W. Bush in 2008; and Reagan back in 1982.

Read more about today’s meeting here.

Watch: Biden joins the Queen at Windsor Castle 

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President Biden is meeting with the Queen soon at Windsor Castle. Here's what to expect.

Queen Elizabeth II watches a military ceremony at Windsor Castle in England on June 12.

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II will welcome US President Joe Biden and the first lady Jill Biden soon at Windsor Castle, her home outside London.

Biden becomes the 12th sitting president to meet the Queen during her reign, joining a legacy of American leaders paying their respects to a global icon and living piece of history.

It’s her first one-on-one engagement with a world leader since the coronavirus pandemic began. And it’s among her first public engagements since her husband, Prince Philip, died at 99 earlier this year.

Biden and the first lady have a formal audience scheduled with her at Windsor Castle.

To welcome the 46th President, Elizabeth is treating him to an honor guard formed of the Grenadier Guards in the castle’s famous quad, Buckingham Palace has announced. The guards — one of the British Army’s longest-serving units — will give a Royal Salute, and the US National Anthem will be played.

The President will then inspect the troops before rejoining the Queen and first lady to watch the military march-past. Afterward, the group will head into the castle for tea.

The Queen has hosted four other presidents at Windsor: Trump in 2018; Obama in 2016; George W. Bush in 2008; and Reagan back in 1982.

Earlier this week: Ahead of the weekend’s big meeting, the royals undertook something of a charm offensive at the G7 in Cornwall. The Queen, Prince Charles and Camilla, as well as William and Catherine, descended upon the summit for a reception at the world-famous Eden Project, a striking collection of biomes, one of which is home to the largest indoor rainforest on Earth.

The Duchess of Cambridge met the first lady on Friday. The duchess has long championed early childhood education. The pair participated in a roundtable discussion on the subject and toured a school in Cornwall.

Read more about today’s meeting with the Queen here.

The rules Biden should follow when he meets the Queen 

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II mingles with US President Joe Biden and US first lady Jill Biden during a reception at The Eden Project in south west England on June 11.

A meeting with the monarch can be intimidating … even if you are a world leader. The Queen has met nearly every US President to take office during her lengthy reign.

No doubt keen to make a good impression on his first trip abroad, US President Joe Biden will probably want to follow the established conventions for his one-on-one with the 95-year-old monarch. Here’s a quick rundown of the royal rules of engagement.

What you should do

  • There is no obligatory code of conduct to abide by when greeting royals, according to the family’s website. However, it does acknowledge that some may choose to observe “traditional forms.”
  • Basically, that means the Queen doesn’t expect people to bow to her, though many do so anyway. For men, that could be a gentle dip of the head, while women can opt for a small curtsy. You could also add a handshake (if she offers first!) but, either way, the secret is not to overdo it.
  • When meeting the Queen, tradition dictates that she speaks first. In response, the correct form is to first address her as “Your Majesty” before swapping to “Ma’am.” And in case you were wondering, there is a preference in pronunciation here – it should be “Ma’am” to rhyme with “jam.” Whatever you do, don’t use her first name.
  • Although royal protocols have relaxed in more recent years, a top tip is to take your cue from the Queen. If she walks, you follow; if she sits, you can too; and if dinner’s involved, best wait for her to start before tucking in. We all remember Donald Trump’s gaffe when he blocked the Queen and then walked ahead of her during his visit to Windsor.

What you should avoid

  • Don’t be late. According to Debrett’s, the leading authority on British etiquette, “It is correct for everyone to arrive before the royal personage and protocol rules that no guest should leave an event before a member of the Royal Family, except in special circumstances when prior permission should be obtained.” If you do need to duck out, make sure to seek permission through a private secretary first.
  • It may seem obvious but don’t touch the Queen without her consent. She initiates any contact – and that’s a handshake at most. In 2017, the then-Canadian Governor General David Johnston made headlines when he placed his hand on the Queen’s elbow during a visit to Canada House in London. Johnston later said he was simply “anxious” about slippery carpet and chose to forgo convention “to be sure that there was no stumble.”
  • And probably best to avoid going in for a hug. It was quite a frenzy in 2009 when then-first lady Michelle Obama instinctively embraced the Queen (who sort of reciprocated). The British media had a field day, with conflicting observations about the moment. That said, Obama recalled a subsequent visit to Windsor Castle in 2016, when she was fretting over royal protocol but the monarch shrugged it off, declaring it “all rubbish.”

Read more here.

South Africa's Ramaphosa says African Union should have been invited to G7

South Africa's President Cyril Ramaphosa arrives at Cornwall Airport Newquay in England on June 11 for the G7 summit.

South Africa’s President Cyril Ramaphosa used his speech wrapping the end of the G7 summit to say the African Union should have been invited to the gathering.

“Together, collectively, I think we touched on important issues that affect not only the people of South Africa but the people of our continent Africa. We were, unfortunately, the only country from the African continent. We would have preferred that the African Union should have been invited, but be that as it may, we were here,” he said.

South Africa was one of several nations invited to the three-day summit in Cornwall, England. During a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Boris Johnson, the UK reaffirmed its commitment to increase global vaccine access.The two leaders also agreed to work together to “strengthen” the relationship between the UK and South Africa through enhancing trade partnership and investment links.

The G7 is short for the Group of Seven, an organization of leaders from some of the world’s largest economies: Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the US.

Biden says NATO isn’t a "protection racket"

President Biden says he doesn’t view NATO as a “protection racket,” seeking to draw a sharp line between his views of the defense alliance and his predecessor’s.

“We believe that NATO is vital to our ability to maintain American security for the next, remainder of the century,” Biden said at a press conference in England at the culmination of the G7 summit. He will travel to Brussels later Sunday for a NATO summit.

Biden said he would reiterate American commitment to Article 5 collective defense.

“I want them to know, whether they doubted, that we believe NATO in Section Five is a sacred obligation,” he said.

Former US President Trump was frequently critical of NATO, saying countries weren’t paying enough for American protection.

France’s Macron praises return to “familiar language” with Biden at G7

French President Emmanuel Macron said the first G7 Summit under President Biden’s Presidency was a return to a “familiar language.”

“For four years we have, not only us Europeans, but also with our Canadian and Japanese partners in the G7, done everything possible to ensure that the world order in which we believe can continue to function,” Macron said in a closing news conference on Sunday. 

Referring to the previous tense summits involving former US President Donald Trump, Macron told reporters the G7 format’s “effectiveness had been questioned.” 

He warned that the model of international liberal democracy is at risk but that the summit has “shown that we have rediscovered a language that is more familiar to us, where developed economies, whatever their disagreements on regional issues, on bilateral relations, on issues that sometimes give rise to different interpretations, nevertheless share the essential and have the will to coordinate to defend their values, the reform of their systems and their ability to act together in the face of the great contemporary challenges.”

France also pledged to double its commitments from 30 to 60 million doses of Covid-19 vaccine for developing countries by the end of the year. “In a very concrete way, the African Union will receive 5 million doses by the end of the summer.”

Biden says it's important to know whether Covid-19 came from "experiment gone awry"

US President Joe Biden said he was “satisfied” with the agreed G7 communique’s points on China, and once again called for the country to be transparent on Covid-19, telling reporters it’s important to know whether the virus came from animal or “whether it was an experiment gone awry.”

Asked whether he was disappointed the communique didn’t go as far on China as the US may have liked, Biden noted the G7 explicitly agreed to call out human rights issues, non-market issues and forced labor.

“I think there’s plenty of action on China and there’s always something,” Biden said when asked about the G7’s statement, adding: “I’m satisfied.”

Biden also told reporters it’s important for China to be more transparent so the world knows where the virus came from, including if it was “an experiment gone awry in a laboratory.”

“We haven’t had access to the laboratories to determine whether or not — I have not reached a conclusion, because our intelligence community is not certain yet — whether or not this was a consequence from the marketplace of a bat interfacing with animals in the environment that caused this Covid-19 or whether it was an experiment gone awry in a laboratory,” he said.

Biden added, “It’s important to know the answer to that because we have to access, we have to build the system whereby we can know what, when we see another lack of transparency that may produce another pandemic. We have to have access. The world has to have access.”

Some more context: World leaders attending the Group of Seven summit on Sunday issued a call for a new study into the origins of Covid-19, including in China, after an initial report was deemed lacking because Beijing had refused to cooperate.

They agreed to speak out against human rights abuses in China, a matter that had been hotly debated behind closed doors over the course of the three-day summit.

The leaders, in the G7 summit communiqué, also singled out Russia as harboring networks that have conducted ransomware attacks wreaking havoc on critical systems, saying countries must do more to address criminal activity within their borders.

You can read the full communiqué here.

Biden departs Newquay airport. His next stop will be to meet the Queen.

President Joe Biden just departed from Newquay airport in Cornwall en route to Windsor Castle where he will meet with Queen Elizabeth.

The monarch’s meeting with Biden and first lady Jill Biden comes during the President’s visit to the United Kingdom for the G7 summit, his first trip abroad since taking office.

It will also be the Queen’s first major meeting with a world leader since the death of her husband, Prince Philip, in April, and comes after a year in which most of her in-person engagements were shelved because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Biden says he needs more time regarding steel and aluminum tariffs

President Biden suggested Sunday morning that he needs more time regarding ongoing Trump-era steel and aluminum tariffs. 

Pressed by a reporter on how European allies are concerned about the sanctions and his justification for keeping them in place, Biden said, “120 days. Give me a break. I need time,” referring to his first few months in office.

It was the last question Biden took before ending his news conference, leaving the room after. All told, the news conference lasted about 30 minutes.

Biden says there's no "guarantee" to changing Putin's behavior

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends an event via video at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence, outside Moscow, on June 9.

US President Joe Biden said there’s no ”guarantee” to change a leader like Russian President Vladimir Putin’s behavior, but acknowledged that Russia has its own issues the US can use to negotiate.

“Autocrats have enormous power and they don’t have to answer to a public. The fact is that it very well may be that if I respond in kind which I will, that it doesn’t dissuade him - he wants to keep going,” Biden told the traveling press in Cornwall. 

Biden added though, that Russia has “its own dilemmas” pointing to their economy, Covid-19, and Syria and Libya. 

Asked why he believes Putin hasn’t changed his behavior in response to all of the actions the US has taken to this point, Biden simply answered with a laugh: “He’s Vladimir Putin.” 

“I’m not gonna get into much more than that because I’ve got to sit down with him but I’ll be happy to talk after that,” Biden said. 

Pressed on where he can negotiate, Biden told reporters: “I think I’m going to try very hard — there’s places where, I shouldn’t be starting off negotiating in public — let me say it this way: Russia has engaged in activities which we believe are contrary to international norms but they have also bitten off some real problems they’re going to have trouble chewing on.” 

Biden also said he was encouraged by Putin’s comments this morning that Russia is prepared to extradite cyber criminals to the US on a reciprocal basis, if the United States does the same.

G7 leaders released a communiqué at the end of the summit. This is what it says.

World leaders attending the Group of Seven summit on Sunday issued a call for a new study into the origins of Covid-19 after an initial report was deemed lacking because Beijing had refused to cooperate.

They also agreed in a final statement to speak out against human rights abuses in China, a matter that had been hotly debated behind closed doors over the course of the three-day summit.

And they singled out Russia as harboring networks who have conducted ransomware attacks wreaking havoc on critical systems, saying countries must do more to address criminal activity within their borders.

Read the full communique below:

Here's what President Biden said was accomplished during the three-day G7 summit 

US President Joe Biden just wrapped a news conference following the end of the G7 summit, and touted the accomplishments of the gathering of world leaders.

Here are some of the things Biden said were pledged during the three-day summit:

  • G7 will contribute over 1 billion doses of vaccine to poor countries. Biden reiterated that the US will provide half a billion doses of Pfizer vaccine which have been “contracted and paid for,” as well a putting additional money into the COVAX project. He said that 200 million will be provided by the end of the year, and another 300 million by the first half of next year. He said that the rest of the G7 will provide another half billion in doses. “And we’ve agreed to work together so the world is better prepared to detect and deal with future pandemics. Because there will be future pandemics.” 
  • G7 supports a global minimum tax. Biden said G7 leaders endorsed a global minimum tax of 15%. “Too many corporations have been engaged in what are essentially tax savings, deciding that they would pay considerably less in other environments around the world,” he said. Biden said this is going to make sure there is a minimum tax for corporations to pay for the profits they make anywhere in the world. 
  • G7 commits to support infrastructure in the developing world. He said the group agreed to help meet “more than $40 trillion need” that exists for infrastructure in the developing world. He said the G7 is going to provide and support projects in four key areas: climate, health, digital technology and gender equity. “We believe that is good for the countries but good for the entire world and represent values that our democracies represent and not autocratic lack of values,” Biden said. 
  • G7 supports transition to clean energy. Biden said the G7 made a commitment to permanently eliminate the use of our public finance to produce unabated coal products around the world and to end them by this year. He added that “those who were not members but visiting members who were participating in the G7 who have coal-fired facilities have also agreed they will work in that direction as well.” He called the transition to clean energy sources “urgent, it is essential” to working to combat climate change. 

Read more about the outcome of the summit here.

Biden says it might "take slightly longer" than 2022 to end the pandemic

Asked if it is realistic to end the pandemic by 2022, President Biden said, “it might take slightly longer worldwide.”

Biden was asked how he plans to bridge the gap and help provide the billions of vaccine doses that are needed around the world. He said. “I think there is a possibility over 2022 going into 2023 that we would be able to be in a position to provide another billion” vaccine doses.

Biden said earlier during the news conference that the G7 has committed to provide more than one billion doses to countries around the world. He said “there was a clear consensus among all of our colleagues at the G7 that this wasn’t the end.” 

Biden said that in addition to providing doses, he intends to work with countries to develop their own technology to manufacture and distribute vaccines.

He said that it is the right thing to do from a “moral standpoint” and in terms of public health and security.

“You can’t build a wall high enough to keep out new strains,” Biden said.

Biden agrees with Putin that US-Russia relations are at a "low point"

US President Joe Biden said he thinks Russian President Vladimir Putin was correct when he said US-Russia relations are at a low point, in a news conference in Cornwall Sunday. 

“I think he’s right it’s a low point – and it depends on how he responds to acting consistent with international norms. Which in many cases he has not,” Biden said of Putin’s comments earlier this week. 

Biden also defended the decision to not hold a joint news conference with the Russian President, saying the summit is “not a contest about who can do better in front of a press conference or try to embarrass each other.”

“It’s about making myself very clear what the conditions are to get a better relationship are with Russia. We’re not looking for conflict. We are looking to resolve those actions which we think our inconsistent with international norms,” the President said.

Biden added that he also hopes the summit will provide ways in which the US and Russia can work together, adding that they may be able to do so in “terms of some strategic doctrine” and possibly on climate issues. 

“I think the best way to deal with this is for he and I to meet. He and I to have our discussion. I know you don’t doubt that I’ll be very straightforward with him,” Biden said with a laugh to the press. 

Biden said he will “make clear” from his view how the meeting turned out in a solo press conference after, and Putin will do the same, adding he didn’t want the summit to be overshadowed by such optics as “did they shake hands” or “who talked the most.”

Biden: "America is back at the table"

US President Joe Biden speaks at a press conference at Cornwall Airport Newquay in England on June 13.

US President Joe Biden used his first news conference of his first overseas trip to send a clear message to the rest of the world, that “America is back at the table.”

“I conveyed to each of my G7 counter parts that the United States is going to do our part, America is back at the table. America is back at the table,” the President said at a news conference from Newquay airport in Cornwall after the third and final day of the G7 summit.

“The lack of participation in the past and full engagement was noticed significantly —not only by the leaders of those countries but by the people in the G7 countries. And America is back in the business of leading the world alongside nations who share our most deeply held values. And so the bottom line is I was very pleased with the outcome of the entire conference,” he said.

Biden also gave a preview of the next part of his trip in Europe.

“Now I’m going to be heading off to Brussels to NATO and the same – many of the same people are going to be at that table in NATO. And to make the case we are back as well. We do not view NATO as a sort of a protection racket. We believe that NATO is vital to our ability to keep American security for the next, the next remainder of the century,” Biden said in stark contrast to his predecessor former US President Donald Tump.

Trump long challenged and pushed NATO members to spend more on defense and even suggested the alliance was obsolete. Ahead of a summit to mark the organization’s 70th anniversary in 2019, Trump successfully cut US contribution to NATO’s budget.

President Biden used this news conference to strike a very different tone.

“Bottom line is, I think we made some on reestablishing American credibility among our closest friends and our values,” he said.

NOW: President Biden holds news conference as G7 summit wraps

US President Joe Biden speaks at a press conference at Cornwall Airport Newquay in England on June 13.

US President Joe Biden is holding a news conference from Newquay airport in Cornwall after the third and final day of the G7 summit.

“We’ve just wrapped up what has been an extraordinary collaborate and productive meeting in the the G7,” Biden told reporters. “Everyone at the table understood and understands both the seriousness and the challenges that we are up against and the responsibility of our proud democracies to step up and deliver for the rest of the world. That is what the G7 is all about.”

Biden said “ending the pandemic” and “maintaining robust support” for inclusive global economic recovery were the top priorities of the nations at the summit.

“We know we can’t achieve one without the other, that is why we have to deal with the pandemic in order to be able to deal with economic recovery,” Biden said.

This is the first news conference of Biden’s first overseas trip.

In the final communiqué that was released at the end of the summit Sunday, world leaders called for a new study into the origins of coronavirus, including in China, after an initial report was deemed lacking because Beijing refused to cooperate.

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson confirmed at a news conference earlier today that leaders of the world’s richest nations have pledged over one billion Covid-19 vaccine doses for the rest of the world – either directly or through funding to COVAX.

CNN’s Kevin Liptak and Angela Dewan contributed reporting to this post.

G7 leaders in "fantastic harmony," Johnson says, denying diplomatic row

The British Prime Minister shrugged off reports of a rift with French President Emmanuel Macron over a trade pact, as the fallout from Brexit continues to overshadow other issues at the G7 summit in Cornwall, England.  

Speaking at a news conference to close the summit, Johnson said the “vast, vast majority” of the conversations have been about other subjects, and that there has been a “fantastic degree of harmony” on climate change and Covid-19 vaccines.

However earlier in the day, UK Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab described comments made by Macron on Northern Ireland as “offensive” after UK media reported on Saturday that Macron had suggested during the summit that Northern Ireland is not part of the United Kingdom. 

Johnson also said the UK shares “common interests” with US President Joe Biden in areas such as climate change, female education and in “leveling up” in infrastructure and technology.  “We are totally on the same page,” on green initiatives and they share “many policy goals” he said. “It  is the job of the UK prime minister to get on with the American President,” he added.

Johnson dodged a question about whether he would take the knee, should he ever be called up to play on England’s football team, after the team was booed by parts of the crowd at a Euro match on Sunday after some players took the knee. Johnson responded that “everyone should cheer the England team,” and that it was unlikely he would ever play for England.

Boris Johnson says G7 committed to support push for worldwide girls education initiative

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said that the G7 came together this week to support the Global Partnership for Education, which is working to give every child in the world a chance at education reach half of its five-year fundraising goal. He said the UK would be contributing a “430M pound donation” to the organization.

“I’m very very pleased that the G7 came together to support that cause,” Johnson said. “Because educating all children, particularly girls, is one of the easiest ways to lift countries out of poverty and help them rebound from the coronavirus crisis.”

He said it’s an “international disgrace” that some children are denied the opportunity to learn and reach their full potential.

“I’m proud that G7 countries have agreed to get 40 million more girls into schools, 20 million more reading by the end of primary school in the next five years,” Johnson said.

He said he wants to see every girl in the world access to 12 years of quality education .

The leader said that the money we have raised this week is a “fantastic start.”

G7 calls for new study into origins of Covid-19 and voices concern on China in summit's concluding statement

World leaders attending this week’s G7 issued a call for a new study into the origins of coronavirus, including in China, after an initial report was deemed lacking because Beijing refused to cooperate.

They also agreed in a final statement to speak out against human rights abuses in China, a matter that had been hotly debated behind closed doors over the course of the three-day summit.

And they singled out Russia as harboring networks who have conducted ransomware attacks wreaking havoc on critical systems, saying countries must do more to address criminal activity within their borders.

American officials characterized the China language in particular as a coup for President Biden, who entered the summit hoping to convince fellow leaders to take a tougher line. He has made the competition between democracies and autocracies a central theme of his first foreign trip, and wants leaders of other democratic countries to more vocally speak out against authoritarian regimes.

He met resistance from some European leaders, who do not share Biden’s view of China as an existential threat. It was unclear leading up to the final session whether language specifically calling out forced labor practices or human rights abuses would be included in the final statement.

Ultimately, the final communiqué that was released on Sunday expressed “concern” about state-sponsored forced labor, particularly in agricultural, solar, and garment sectors. It said China must respect human rights in Xinjiang, allow a high degree of autonomy in Hong Kong and work to avoid a security deterioration in the South China Sea.

It also called on leaders to consult one another to find ways to counter abusive economic practices.

“This has been an unusually substantive and productive G7,” a White House official said.

Some more context: The summit’s concluding statement came after an intense debate on the language that stretched overnight. US administration officials said on Saturday that while Biden and other leaders got along well, the China issue posed an area of disagreement.

In particular, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi and leaders from the European Union appeared reluctant to include lines in the final document that might be viewed as a provocation to China, according to senior administration officials.

Biden was backed in his views by British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and, to a degree, by French President Emmanuel Macron, who has adopted a harder line on China as he faces reelection next year.

Read more about the statement here.

G7 nations pledge over 1 billion Covid-19 vaccine doses for the rest of world, UK prime minister says

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks at a press conference at the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, England, on June 13.

In a statement to mark the end of the G7 summit, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson confirmed that leaders of the world’s richest nations have pledged over one billion Covid-19 vaccine doses for the rest of the world – either directly or through funding to COVAX.

“A week ago I asked my fellow leaders to help in preparing and providing the doses we need to vaccinate the whole world by the end of 2022. I’m very pleased to announce that this weekend leaders have pledged over 1 billion doses, either directly or through funding to COVAX. That includes 100 million from the UK, to the worlds poorest countries, which is another big step toward vaccinating the world,” Johnson said.

Speaking about the Oxford-​AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine at the news conference, Johnson said, “Today over half a billion people are safe because of the development and production of that vaccine.”

“What we as the G7 need to do is to demonstrate the benefits of democracy and freedom and human rights to the rest of the world. We can achieve that through medical history. We can do that by working together to stop the devastation that coronavirus has produced from ever occurring again,” he added.

Earlier this week, Johnson announced the UK will donate at least 100 million surplus Covid-19 vaccine doses to COVAX and countries in need within the next year.

Ahead of the G7 summit, US President Joe Biden announced the United States plans to donate 500 million Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine doses globally. As for a timeline, officials said the Pfizer doses will begin to ship in August and 200 million doses will be delivered by the end of this year. The remaining 300 million doses will be delivered in the first half of 2022.

NOW: UK prime minister speaks after G7 summit wraps 

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson is holding a news conference as the three day G7 summit comes to a close in Carbis Bay, England.

Climate and the economy were key issues in the summit’s final plenary sessions.

Leaders of the world’s richest economies also agreed to “align” their positions on vaccines, funds for Africa and fighting against “pressure from authoritarian regimes,” EU Council President Charles Michel said earlier Sunday.

However, fallout from the UK’s departure from the European Union continues to overshadow Johnson’s efforts to reposition post-Brexit Britain on the global stage.

G7 countries join forces on vaccine deliveries, EU chief says

President of the European Council Charles Michel, left, speaks with leaders at the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, England, on June 11.

G7 leaders have agreed to “align” their positions on vaccines, funds for Africa and fighting against “pressure from authoritarian regimes,” EU Council President Charles Michel said on Sunday at the G7 summit in Cornwall, England.

Over the last three days at the summit the EU has worked to convince the “world’s leading democracies” to join it in accelerating global vaccine deliveries. “The priority was to ensure we can meet the demand for vaccines and here the EU has taken the leadership. Partners have now joined us to accelerate production and delivery of vaccines worldwide,” Michel said.

“We also see that liberal democracies and open societies face pressure from authoritarian regimes. This challenge has prompted us to join forces during the G7, not only to be able to respond under pressure or attack but also to spread our values of freedom, rule of law and respect for human rights,” he said.

“Another point, of special significance to me, is our engagement with Africa. For some years already, with some leaders in Europe we are convinced that this engagement with Africa needs to be at the heart of our future international relations. Increasingly, we’ve been able to unify the positions of European countries on this issue and now we have convinced our partners to further mobilise funds to secure a win-win strategy for Africa and Europe,” Michel added in a statement.

G7 leaders will agree to cut off support for dirty coal by end of the year

US President Joe Biden arrives for a plenary session in Carbis Bay, England, on June 13.

G7 leaders are expected to announce on Sunday that they will stop all new direct government support for coal by the end of the year, unless it is “cleaned” through a process of decarbonization, according to a White House statement.

Coal is the dirtiest fossil fuel and one of the biggest contributors to climate change. G7 leaders are expected to announce they will at least halve their carbon emissions by 2030, from 2010 levels, and cutting back on coal could help reach that target.

Some scientists and environmentalists, however, are wary of claims of “clean” fossil fuels, and argue that the world should transition entirely to renewables instead.

The White House said in a statement that G7 leaders, who will wrap up a three-day summit in England’s Cornwall on Sunday, had agreed to “concrete actions” to speed up the world’s transition from coal to cleaner energy sources.

“Recognizing that unabated coal power generation is the single biggest source of greenhouse gas emissions globally, and consistent with