Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds.

A Chinese investor walks past an investment map showing suitable property markets for wealthy Chinese to invest in at the International Property Expo in Beijing on April 11, 2014.  Wealthy Chinese will pour AUD$44 billion (US$39.4 billion) into Australian real estate over the next seven years, potentially pushing prices in one of the world's most expensive housing markets even higher. Chinese property investors have been on a international spending spree since the global financial crisis hit most of the world's economies.      AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON        (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
A Chinese investor walks past an investment map showing suitable property markets for wealthy Chinese to invest in at the International Property Expo in Beijing on April 11, 2014.  Wealthy Chinese will pour AUD$44 billion (US$39.4 billion) into Australian real estate over the next seven years, potentially pushing prices in one of the world's most expensive housing markets even higher. Chinese property investors have been on a international spending spree since the global financial crisis hit most of the world's economies.      AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON        (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

    JUST WATCHED

    Guerra comercial: ¿por qué atacar a los aliados y no a rivales como China?

MUST WATCH

Guerra comercial: ¿por qué atacar a los aliados y no a rivales como China?

La posible detonación de una guerra comercial, por la decisión de EE.UU. de imponer aranceles al acero y al aluminio, hace que varios países alisten represalias. ¿Por qué atacar a sus aliados y no a sus rivales como China? Lo analizamos con Ana María Salazar, exasesora adjunta de defensa para la región durante la administración de Bill Clinton.

Guerra comercial: ¿por qué atacar a los aliados y no a rivales como China?

La posible detonación de una guerra comercial, por la decisión de EE.UU. de imponer aranceles al acero y al aluminio, hace que varios países alisten represalias. ¿Por qué atacar a sus aliados y no a sus rivales como China? Lo analizamos con Ana María Salazar, exasesora adjunta de defensa para la región durante la administración de Bill Clinton.