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Demand for gas is rising after pipeline hack
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What you need to know

  • Gasoline demand is spiking in several states following a ransomware attack that shut down the Colonial Pipeline.
  • In just five states the Colonial Pipeline serves – Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia – demand was up by a collective 40.1% on Monday, per GasBuddy.
  • A growing list of impacted states have declared a state of emergency to ensure adequate fuel supplies.

Our live coverage has ended. Read more about the gasoline demand here.

26 Posts

Why Americans are panic buying fuel

Cars line up to fill their gas tanks at a COSTCO at Tyvola Road in Charlotte, North Carolina on May 11.

Several gas stations along the East Coast ran out of fuel Tuesday as worried drivers aggressively filled their tanks. 

Here’s how we got here:

  • What is Colonial Pipeline? The Colonial Pipeline system spans more than 5,500 miles and transports about 45% of all fuel consumed on the East Coast. It transports 2.5 million barrels per day of gasoline, diesel, jet fuel and home heating oil.
  • What happened: The run on fuel began after a ransomware attack Friday shut down the Colonial Pipeline. The company said Monday it hopes to be substantially operational by the end of the week after a hack that authorities believe was carried out by a criminal group called DarkSide. As of Tuesday, most of the pipeline remained offline.
  • How is this impacting demand for gas? As of 4 p.m. ET Tuesday, 8.5% of gas stations in North Carolina and 7.7% in Virginia didn’t have gasoline, according to outage figures reported by GasBuddy, an app that tracks fuel prices and demand. Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina also reported outages. Even GasBuddy itself reported out website outages as result of “extreme traffic.” 
  • What does this mean for prices at the pump? As demand shot up, the national price at the pump hit $2.985 on Tuesday, the highest level in nearly six years, according to AAA. 
  • How states are responding: Virginia’s governor declared a state of emergency due to fuel shortages. Georgia, North Carolina, Florida and other state governments also stepped in to ease supply concerns. The Environmental Protection Agency issued an emergency fuel waiver.
  • What should you do? The best thing for car owners to do right now is take a deep breath and don’t rush to fill your tanks unless you have to. A big part of the problem is panic, Tiffany Wright of AAA Carolinas said. “We are our own worst enemy in this situation because we are over-consuming at the pump.”

Florida issues state of emergency due to disruption of fuel supplies

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis today declared a state of emergency in the state of Florida due to the cyberattack on Colonial Pipeline and the disruption of fuel supplies. 

Additionally, DeSantis ordered the Adjutant General to activate the Florida National Guard, as needed, to deal with the emergency.

As part of the state of emergency, the secretary of Florida’s Department of Transportation will be allowed to suspend enforcement of the registration requirements for commercial motor vehicles that enter the state to provide fuel, emergency services, or supplies. The secretary will also be allowed to waive the size and weight restrictions on vehicles supporting emergency relief efforts by transporting gasoline, diesel fuel, jet fuel, and other refined petroleum products in Florida.  

Colonial Pipeline has manually delivered nearly one million barrels of fuel since cyber attack, company says 

The beleaguered Colonial Pipeline company says they are making “forward progress” as they work to fully bring their pipeline system back online, according to a new statement Tuesday evening. 

The company says it is working with the US Department of Energy to prioritize delivering inventory to constrained fuel markets that are not already being supplied by alternate delivery mechanisms. 

Since the main pipeline was shut down on Friday following a devastating ransomware cyber attack, Colonial Pipeline said it has worked with shippers to deliver approximately 967,000 barrels of fuel to customers. 

“Consistent with our safety policies and regulatory requirements, Colonial has increased aerial patrols of our pipeline right of way,” the statement said, “and deployed more than 50 personnel to walk and drive ~5,000 miles of pipeline each day.”

Speaking to reporters at the White House on Tuesday, Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm said Colonial Pipeline indicated it fully expects “to substantially restore operations by the end of this week.”

Florida gas shortages sporadic and limited to northern part of the state, official says

Ned Bowman, the executive director for Florida Petroleum Marketing Association, told CNN that gas station shortages and outages were not widespread, and largely limited to the north of the state.  

Bowman said that he has been in contact with gas station owners and the state government throughout the day. He’s been told that the outages tend to be focused largely in the greater Tallahassee area.  

That’s because that area is largely refilled by the Bainbridge, Georgia, spur of the Colonial Pipeline. He expects many of the stations that are out of gas right now to have gas by tomorrow morning, because they can be supplied from reserves in Jacksonville and Pensacola, Florida.

He encouraged Floridians to “take deep breathes” and to not fill up cars needlessly.  

Biden officials privately frustrated with Colonial Pipeline's weak security ahead of crippling cyberattack

A Colonial Pipeline station is seen, Tuesday, May 11, in Smyrna, Georgia, near Atlanta.

Biden administration officials have privately voiced frustration with what they see as Colonial Pipeline’s weak security protocols and a lack of preparation ahead of the crippling ransomware attack that could have allowed hackers access, officials familiar with government’s initial investigation into the incident told CNN.

Because their investigation is still ongoing, Colonial has yet to share information with the federal government about the vulnerability the ransomware group DarkSide took advantage of to infiltrate the fuel company, according to a top official with the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. The FBI initially told CISA about the attack, not Colonial Pipeline, the agency’s acting director told lawmakers on Tuesday. 

Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas suggested at a White House briefing Tuesday that the administration is examining Colonial Pipeline’s vulnerabilities.

Colonial Pipeline declined to comment on the suggestion members of the administration are frustrated.

US officials are also working to track down the specific actors responsible for the breach, according to two people familiar with the federal response, a key part of the broader effort to bring the individual hackers to justice.

The internal tensions underscore the stark challenge facing the Biden administration as it continues to grapple with the fallout from the brazen ransomware attack on the country’s critical infrastructure despite having limited access to the private company’s systems and technical information about the vulnerabilities exploited by the hackers. 

“Our understanding is that that is part of the investigation that Colonial’s response vendor is still undertaking. That information has not yet been shared with the US government,” CISA Executive Assistant Director for Cybersecurity Eric Goldstein told CNN in a phone interview.

Colonial Pipeline also did not contact CISA in the wake of the cyberattack, according to a senior cyber official at the agency, Brandon Wales.

“They did not contact CISA directly,” he told lawmakers during a hearing on Capitol Hill Tuesday. “We were brought in by the FBI after they were notified about the incident.”

Still, US officials want to go on the offensive, and believe identifying the individual hackers who targeted Colonial Pipeline is one way of deterring future ransomware attacks. 

“This was a gross miscalculation on the hackers’ part,” said one of the people, who noted that the hackers likely had not anticipated that their attack would lead to the shutdown of the US’ largest refined products pipeline system, spurring emergency White House meetings and a whole-of-government response. 

The hackers operated under the banner of a relatively new ransomware group known as DarkSide, according to the FBI. Because DarkSide effectively operates under a “hacker services for hire” structure, US officials want to identify the specific actors who carried out the attack in the group’s name, the people familiar with the matter said. 

Read the full story here.

Maryland "prepared for all contingencies" following pipeline shutdown, governor says

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said Tuesday that the state is “prepared for all contingencies” following the voluntary shutdown of the Colonial Pipeline, according to a series of tweets.

“Since Saturday morning, when we activated a statewide response, Maryland has been closely coordinating with the federal administration and local jurisdictions,” said the governor.

“We will keep Marylanders informed of any significant impacts on our fuel supply. For now, drivers should proceed as normal,” said Hogan.

These are some of the states that have declared a state of emergency over gas shortages

Customers wait in line to purchase fuel at the Duck-Thru in Scotland Neck, North Carolina, on Tuesday, May 11.

Georgia has joined a growing list of states declaring a state of emergency over potential gas shortages.

Shortly after 2 p.m. ET Tuesday, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam issued a state of emergency declaration “to prepare and coordinate our response to the voluntary shutdown of the Colonial Pipeline due to a cyber-attack,” according to the declaration.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper declared a state of emergency Monday evening, a move that allowed him to temporarily suspend some fuel regulations in a bid to ensure adequate supply.

That makes a total of at least three US states implementing emergency measures to ensure fuel doesn’t run dry:

  • Georgia
  • Virginia
  • North Carolina

A number of gas stations along the East Coast are currently out of fuel after drivers aggressively filled up their tanks following a ransomware attack that shut down the Colonial Pipeline, a critical artery for gasoline.

The national price at the pump hit $2.985 on Tuesday, the highest level in nearly six years, according to AAA.

The Colonial Pipeline, which supplies nearly half the diesel and gasoline to the East Coast, said Monday it hopes to be substantially operational by the end of the week.

State of emergency declared in Georgia as a result of gas shortage

A gasoline station that ran out of gas for sale displays an out of service sign on the pump on Tuesday, May 11, in Atlanta.

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp declared a state of emergency on Monday as a result of the gas shortage from the May 7, 2021 cyber-attack on the Colonial Pipeline, according to a release from the Georgia Office of the Attorney General.

The state of emergency will remain in effect through 11:59 p.m. ET on May 15, 2021, the release said.

When the state of emergency was declared, Georgia’s price gouging statutes were also activated.

According to the release, this means that while the state of emergency remains in effect, businesses will not be allowed to charge more for products and services identified by the Governor, including motor fuel and diesel fuel. 

“While we believe this to be a short-term event, we do not want consumers to be taken advantage of,” Attorney General Carr said. “Our office will review all price gouging complaints received to ensure the law is followed.”

These are the measures the Transportation Department is considering to try to ease fuel delivery

Federal officials said Tuesday they are considering additional ways to ease fuel delivery up the East Coast, addressing outages caused by panic buying in response to the Colonial Pipeline hack. 

The Transportation Department said it is surveying the capabilities of US-flagged ships to transport fuel to costal ports. It expects to complete the survey later on Tuesday, and, if warranted, would consider asking the Homeland Security Department to allow for foreign-flagged ships to make deliveries.

The federal Jones Act generally restricts foreign-flagged vessels from both picking up and delivering goods such as fuel within the country. 

Officials said they are looking for ways to streamline the delivery of fuel from the coast to inland locations by rail.  

Federal highway regulators also expanded the area subject to relaxed trucking restrictions. 

West Virginia now makes the 18th state where hours of service rules – which regulate the length of workday and rest periods for drivers – are waived for truckers handling fuel. 

"Extreme traffic" causing GasBuddy app and website to experience "slowdowns"

GasBuddy, an online website and app that helps drivers find gas and gas prices, confirmed to CNN the site is experiencing “slowdowns” because of “extreme traffic” relating to the Colonial Pipeline outage.  

Company spokesperson Patrick DeHaan confirmed to CNN that, “nothing nefarious” was behind the site issues, saying that, “extreme traffic to our services and app likely due to the intense interest in fueling related to the Colonial Pipeline outage” was behind it.  

A number of users have sent messages to the company on social media, complaining that the gas availability data was out-of-date.  

“We [are] scraping by but trying to keep the boat afloat and dousing the fires as quickly as we can,” DeHaan went onto say. “We’re just absolutely overwhelmed with some of the highest traffic to the app we’ve ever seen — our amazing engineering teams are feverishly working on adjusting as necessary to keep everything running normally.”

DeHaan said that users may experience some “periodic timeouts” using the website or app.

North Carolina price gouging law goes into effect in response to Colonial Pipeline cyberattack

Cars line up to fill their gas tanks at a Costco at Tyvola Road in Charlotte, North Carolina, on May 11.

A day after North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper declared a state of emergency in response to the Colonial Pipeline cyberattack and temporary shutdown, the state’s price gouging law has gone into effect, according to a news release from North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein.

According to the law, businesses impacted by the incident that triggered the state of emergency may “have a reasonable need to increase prices in order to resupply, but they should disclose these increases and allow people to make informed purchasing decisions,” Stein said in the statement.

Businesses cannot “unreasonably” raise prices as a means to turn a profit from the emergency, the law states.

“The hackers who breached Colonial Pipeline’s systems have made it harder for hardworking North Carolinians to go about their lives, but I will not allow businesses to take advantage of this incident to charge excessive prices,” Stein added.

Small gas station chain in Georgia and South Carolina begins limiting gas purchases

Small gas station chain, Parker’s, announced on Facebook on Tuesday that customers would be limited to $50 worth of gas.  

The rationing is a result of the Colonial Pipeline being shut down, they said in a Facebook post. Now, all fuel purchases made at Parker’s — they have 68 locations in Georgia and South Carolina — will be limited to $50 per customer.

“The Parker’s fuel team is working diligently to keep our tanks filled in the wake of this unexpected situation,” the chain wrote on Facebook. “While we understand that this is an inconvenience, know that we are doing everything we can to source fuel and keep gas readily available for our customers.”

South Carolina attorney general announces price gouging law in effect due to pipeline disruption

South Carolina’s price gouging law is in effect after Attorney General Alan Wilson announced on Tuesday that he declared an abnormal disruption in the market following the hacking of the Colonial Pipeline.

“I’m urging everyone to be careful and be patient,” said Wilson in a press release. “We hope this gas shortage will last just a few days, but we must be wary of individuals looking to unfairly take advantage of the situation through price gouging. According to state law, price gouging constitutes a criminal violation and an unfair trade practice.”

The law prohibits unreasonable prices during times of disaster. Offenders can be punished with a $1,000 fine and/or 30 days in jail. 

Wilson asked those who witness any price gouging to contact his office. “I urge citizens to remain vigilant and notify my office immediately if you believe you have witnessed or are aware of price gouging,” he said. 

Energy secretary urges Americans not to hoard gas as spike in demand hits several states

Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm holds a press briefing in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House in Washington on May 11.

Energy secretary Jennifer Granholm urged Americans not to hoard gas amid a spike in demand, following the ransomware attack that shut down the Colonial Pipeline along the East Coast.

Granholm said that Colonial expects to substantially restore operations by the end of the week, but even after a possible decision to fully restart the supply of gas through the pipeline, it will take a few days to ramp up operations.

 “And still I want to be clear that these states who are impacted, even with the turning on of the pipeline system, they still may feel a supply crunch as Colonial fully resumes. But the American people can feel assured that this administration is working with the company to get it resumed as soon as possible,” Granholm said during Tuesday’s White House press briefing.

Despite that, Granholm said Americans should not buy gas they don’t need, this as some gas stations have run out of fuel.

“Let me emphasize that much as there was no cause for say, hoarding toilet paper at the beginning of the pandemic, there should be no cause for hoarding gasoline, especially in light of the fact that the pipeline should be substantially operational by the end of this week and over the weekend,” she said.

A number of gas stations along the East Coast are currently out of fuel after drivers aggressively filled up their tanks following the attack on the Colonial Pipeline.

As of 11 a.m. ET Tuesday, 7.6% of the gas stations in Virginia and 5.8% in North Carolina didn’t have gasoline, according to outage figures reported by GasBuddy, an app that tracks fuel prices and demand.

Granholm also called on gas station owners to act responsibly and not price gouge during the supply crunch. 

“I do want to say this, that we expect that gas station owners are and should act responsibly. We will have no tolerance for price gouging. Federal and state officials will be investigating those actions if they see price gouging and we are urging consumers to report any price gouging to their state attorneys general,” Granholm said.

Virginia governor declares state of emergency due to potential statewide gas shortages 

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam on Tuesday issued a state of emergency declaration “to prepare and coordinate our response to the voluntary shutdown of the Colonial Pipeline due to a cyber-attack,” according to the declaration.

Northam said, “if prolonged, the pipeline closure will result in gasoline supply disruptions to various retailers throughout the Commonwealth, since the pipeline is the primary source of gasoline to many Virginia retailers.”

According to the governor, “while current gasoline reserves in the Commonwealth are sufficient to address immediate supply concerns, a long-term disruption in the pipelines will require transportation of fuel and other oil-derivatives via interstate and state roadways.”

The declaration directs all “state and local governments to render appropriate assistance to alleviate any conditions resulting from the situation.”

As of 11 a.m. ET, 7.6% of the gas stations in Virginia don’t have fuel, according to outage figures reported by GasBuddy, an app that tracks fuel prices and demand.

See the governor’s tweet:

What the scene is like at two local North Carolina gas stations

Patsy Dowell, a Maryland resident, told CNN he drove to North Carolina to see his mom for Mother’s Day.

This morning, he went to the Speedway gas station on Highway 321 in Boone, North Carolina, to fill up his tank and planned to head back to Baltimore tomorrow.

Even though he was able to get a full tank after a 30-minute wait, he said after seeing the situation at the gas station he decided to stay back in North Carolina with his parents for a few extra days.

“My drive back home to Baltimore is about 8 hours, Dowell said. “I’m lucky I can stay here a few extra days. I hope it’s not like this everywhere. Lots of stations with bags over pump handles and ones with gas have long lines.”

“The price was $2.89 which is about 10 cents more than Friday,” Dowell said. “Every pump had a car waiting and line was probably about 75 cars lined up in street.”

See the photo:

In Asheville, North Carolina, Sarah Colley told CNN that in a photo she took you can see a gas station in the background but the cars you see in line are actually queuing up for another gas station not too far off.

“The line was pretty dang long and we saw that at every gas station yesterday,” she said. “But now every gas station is out of gas completely.”

The price signs are off and there are signs on the pumps saying “out of fuel” and covers over all the handles, according to Colley.

Colley said she wasn’t able to fill up her gas tank but luckily she works from home. Prices were around $2.67- $2.77 yesterday in her area, she said.

“My boyfriend is a chef and he usually takes others home at night but he told his boss he can’t because he doesn’t have enough gas for the week,” she said.

See the photo:

DHS cyber agency still awaiting for technical information from pipeline ransomware attack

Fuel tanks are seen at Colonial Pipeline Baltimore Delivery in Baltimore, Maryland on May 10.

The Department of Homeland Security is still awaiting additional technical information from the Colonial Pipeline ransomware attack so its cybersecurity agency can help other critical infrastructure partners protect their own systems, Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency acting Director Brandon Wales said Tuesday. 

Colonial Pipeline, which was hit by a ransomware attack last week prompting a halt in operations, did not contact CISA in the wake of the cyberattack, Wales added. 

“I think right now we are waiting for additional technical information on exactly what happened at Colonial so we can use that information to potentially protect other potential victims down the road,” Wales said. 

Wales said it’s “not surprising” that they haven’t yet received information, since its early in the investigation, adding that CISA has historically had a “good relationship” with both Colonial, as well as the cybersecurity firms that are working on their behalf. 

“We do expect information to come from that and when we have it we will use it to improve cybersecurity more broadly,” he said.  

“They did not contact CISA directly,” he said. “We were brought in by the FBI after they were notified about the incident.”

However, Wales said the agency received information “fairly quickly in concert with the FBI,” when pressed by Senate Homeland Security Ranking Member Rob Portman on whether it would have been helpful if Colonial reached out “immediately.”

Yet, Wales acknowledged that he did not believe Colonial would have connected them without the FBI involvement. 

Rising number of gas stations are running out of fuel

A growing number of gas stations along the East Coast are without fuel as demand surges and the Colonial Pipeline shutdown stretches into a fifth day.

As of 11 a.m. ET, 7.6% of the gas stations in Virginia and 5.8% in North Carolina don’t have fuel, according to outage figures reported by GasBuddy, an app that tracks fuel prices and demand.

Outages are also being reported at gas stations in Georgia (4%), Florida (2.5%) and South Carolina (1.9%), according to GasBuddy, which collects user reports and shares the information with the government during emergencies.

“Panicked buying” is “running stations in the region dry,” Patrick De Haan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, told CNN Business.

He warned that the “irrational behavior” could prolong supply issues “for weeks.”

GasBuddy lists smaller outages, impacting less than 1% of the gas stations, in Alabama and Tennessee.

“I got scared that I could not go to work or take my daughters to school,” Florida resident Linderly Bedoya told CNN on Tuesday. “All the gas stations in my area were without gas and when I finally found one I had to stay an hour in line and I had to fill up with the premium unleaded.”

Here is why gasoline prices are spiking around the US

Gas stations display the price of gasoline in Leonia, New Jersey, on Monday, May 10.

A cyberattack forced one of the largest US fuel pipelines to shut down Friday, and analysts are worried the disruption could result in a spike in gas prices.

If you’re just reading in now, here’s how we got here:

  • What is Colonial Pipeline: The Colonial Pipeline system spans more than 5,500 miles and transports about 45% of all fuel consumed on the East Coast. It transports 2.5 million barrels per day of gasoline, diesel, jet fuel and home heating oil.
  • What happened: Colonial Pipeline Company said it was the victim of a cybersecurity attack that involved ransomware. In an update on Sunday, the company said that its four mainlines remain offline, but some smaller lines between terminals and delivery points are now operational. “We are in the process of restoring service to other laterals and will bring our full system back online only when we believe it is safe to do so, and in full compliance with the approval of all federal regulations,” it added in a statement.
  • What does this mean for prices at the pump: The shutdown could extend a recent jump in gasoline prices — especially if the outage persists — piling on the pain for drivers as the seasonal peak in demand approaches. “The number of days that the line is out of service is critical,” Tom Kloza, global head of energy analysis for the Oil Price Information Service, which tracks gas prices at 140,000 US stations, told CNN Business. Limited supply could mean higher fuel prices for motorists during the spring driving season.
  • Where gas prices are now: US gasoline futures for May delivery gained 1.5% on Monday, rising to $2.16 a gallon. Prices had spiked as much as 4% in early trading. The national average pump price of regular gas stands at $2.97 a gallon, according to AAA, up more than 60% from a year ago when prices and demand were bottoming out. The national average could surpass $3 a gallon this summer, and go even higher if hurricanes hit the Gulf Coast or if there are additional supply outages. US gasoline demand jumped 20% on Monday compared with the prior week, according to GasBuddy, an app that tracks fuel prices and demand. The national price at the pump hit $2.985 on Tuesday, the highest level in nearly six years, according to AAA.

CNN’s Matt Egan contributed reporting to this post.

AAA offers these tips to get the most out of your gas gallons

Cars make their way down the aging 110 freeway toward downtown L.A. during the morning commute on April 22 in Los Angeles.

Although the American Automobile Association (AAA) is forecasting gas prices to climb, they are warning Americans to not panic-buy gasoline.

They offer the following tips to help Americans get the most out of their gas gallons:

  • Plan ahead to accomplish multiple errands in one trip, and whenever possible avoid high-traffic times of day.
  • If you own more than one car, use the most fuel-efficient model that meets the needs of any given journey.
  • Remove unnecessary and bulky items from your car. Minimize your use of roof racks and remove special carriers when not in use. It takes more fuel to accelerate a heavier car, and the reduction in fuel economy is greater for small cars than for larger models.
  • Minimize your use of air conditioning. Even at highway speeds, open windows have less effect on fuel economy than the engine power required to operate the air conditioning compressor.
  • In hot weather, park in the shade or use a windshield sunscreen to lessen heat buildup inside the car. This reduces the need for air conditioning (and thus fuel) to cool down the car.

South Carolina expects "only sporadic delays" in fuel shipments to gas stations, coordinating agency says

The South Carolina Emergency Management Division (SCEMD) tells CNN that so far there are “no reports of widespread outages” and they are “only expecting sporadic delays” in fuel shipments to gas stations in the state.

“We are seeing some posts on Twitter about people trying to stock up on fuel, but so far, no reports of widespread outages and at this point we’re only expecting sporadic delays in fuel shipments to gas stations. We have enough supply if people get fuel as they normally would,” Derrec Becker, SCEMD’s chief of public information & external affairs, told CNN.

The spokesperson for the agency said that although it is slower than accessing the Colonial pipeline, the state has a backup fuel supply chain through the Charleston port that is available to gas stations and local shops.

“We have enough supply if people get fuel as they normally would,” Becker said. “We have a backup fuel supply chain through the Charleston port. It’s a little slower than accessing the Colonial line, particularly in the Upstate, but our Office of Regulatory Staff says the gas station chains and local shops are already accessing their contracts.”

Gas station in Rocky Point, North Carolina runs dry by 10:30 a.m. ET

Lydia Hall sat in line today at a gas station in Rocky Point, North Carolina, for about an hour.

“All the gas stations have lines here out the parking lots,” she told CNN. “All of the gas stations are showing ‘out of order’ on their pumps.”

Just after she filled her mostly empty tank, at around 10:30 a.m. ET, the Shell station ran out of gas, according to a representative that answered the phone there.

The representative did not know when they would get their next shipment of gas.

EPA issues a fuel waiver for states affected by pipeline shut down

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is issuing an emergency fuel waiver “to help alleviate fuel shortages” in states whose gas supply has been impacted by the pipeline shut down following the recent ransomware attack on the Colonial Pipeline, EPA Administrator Michael Regan said in a news release today.

“EPA has waived the federal Reid vapor pressure requirements for fuel sold in Reformulated Gasoline areas of District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia to facilitate the supply of gasoline,” the release said.

The waiver will continue through May 18, the release said.

Gas station in Atlanta suburb has been out of gas since Saturday

Aaron Alonso is still out searching for gas in greater Atlanta.

When he came across the RaceTrac gas station in Peachtree City, Georgia, just South of Atlanta, he saw this sign.

“All pumps are down,” it read. “Sorry for the inconvenience.”

A person that answered the phone at the RaceTrac gas station told CNN they’d been without gas since Saturday and weren’t sure when they’d have it again.

Georgia governor suspends state's gas tax to help with gas prices in wake of Colonial cyberattack

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp signed an executive order Tuesday that suspends the gas tax in the state “to help with higher prices as a result of the Colonial cyber-attack.”

“Today I signed an executive order suspending the gas tax in Georgia to help with higher prices as a result of the Colonial cyber-attack. We are working closely with Colonial and expect for them to recover by the end of the week,” Kemp said in a tweet.

Kemp also announced the order allows for increased weight limits for trucks transporting fuel, “providing more supply for stations as they receive deliveries.”

The order prohibits price gouging as well, according to the statement from the governor.

Kemp said his office has been in close contact with Colonial Pipeline and other industry officials and blamed the media for causing people to “panic.”

“Unfortunately, extensive media coverage has caused people to panic which has resulted in higher gas prices,” the governor said.

US gasoline demand jumps after pipeline hack

American drivers on the East Coast are filling up aggressively following a ransomware attack that shut down the Colonial Pipeline, a critical artery for gasoline.

US gasoline demand jumped 20% on Monday compared with the prior week, according to GasBuddy, an app that tracks fuel prices and demand.

In just five states served by Colonial Pipeline – Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia – demand was up by a collective 40.1%, GasBuddy said.

Meanwhile, North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper declared a state of emergency Monday evening, a move that allowed him to temporarily suspend some fuel regulations in a bid to ensure adequate supply.

The Colonial Pipeline, which supplies nearly half the diesel and gasoline to the East Coast, said Monday it hopes to be substantially operational by the end of the week after a hack that authorities believe was carried out by a criminal group called DarkSide.

The national price at the pump hit $2.985 on Tuesday, the highest level in nearly six years, according to AAA.

However, investors are taking the supply shock in stride. RBOB gasoline futures are little changed from Friday.

Gasoline demand spikes in several states after pipeline hack
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Dow tumbles more than 600 points as surging prices rattle the market
Gasoline demand spikes in several states after pipeline hack
Senior cybersecurity official warns attacks on US are growing more 'sophisticated frequent and aggressive'
Dow tumbles more than 600 points as surging prices rattle the market