Coronavirus pandemic in the US

By Meg Wagner and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 9:32 p.m. ET, May 18, 2020
32 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
12:31 p.m. ET, May 18, 2020

Uber to cut another 3,000 jobs

From CNN’s Sara Ashley O’Brien

David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images
David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Ride-hailing giant Uber announced on Monday that it is cutting another 3,000 employees, the company said in an email to staffers.

In the email to staffers, which was viewed by CNN Business, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi also said the company is “closing or consolidating around 45 office locations globally.”

Some background: The company announced a first round of job cuts on May 2 — getting rid of about 3,700 full-time roles, or roughly 14% of its staff on its customer support and recruiting teams in response to the reduced volume of ride requests and the company's hiring freeze.

Uber also said in the filing that Khosrowshahi will waive his base salary for the rest of 2020.

12:02 p.m. ET, May 18, 2020

Apple will require temperature checks and mask as stores reopen

From CNN’s Jordan Valinsky

Apple staff ask health questions of people entering the Apple store in Perth, Australia, on Monday, May 18.
Apple staff ask health questions of people entering the Apple store in Perth, Australia, on Monday, May 18. Will Russell/Getty Images

Shopping at Apple stores will be a drastically different experience when the company reopens the more than 500 global locations it closed in response to the coronavirus pandemic. 

So far, nearly 100 Apple stores around the world have reopened with extensive changes, including...

  • Temperature checks at the door
  • More frequent deep cleanings
  • Requirements that staff and shoppers wear face coverings

Apple is also limiting the number of people allowed in stores and will begin curbside drop-off and pick-up options at some locations, according to a statement the company released Sunday.

Reopening an Apple store takes planning that depends on multiple factors, said Deirdre O'Brien, Apple's senior vice president of retail and people.

‘"We look at every available piece of data, including local cases, near and long-term trends, and guidance from national and local health officials," she wrote in the statement. "These are not decisions we rush into? and a store opening in no way means that we won't take the preventative step of closing it again should local conditions warrant," O'Brien said.

In China, Apple stores have been "safely open for months," the company said. All 42 of its China locations were shut down for about a month in February during the peak of the outbreak there.

The company has 510 stores worldwide, 271 of which are in the United States.

11:58 a.m. ET, May 18, 2020

New York sports teams should plan to play games without fans, Cuomo says

State of New York
State of New York

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he has been encouraging pro-sports teams in the state to "plan reopenings without fans."

He noted that even if fans weren't in attendance, the games could be televised. 

"New York state will help those major sports franchises to do just that. Hockey, basketball, baseball, football, whoever can reopen. We're a ready, willing and able partner," the governor said.

He noted as a "personal disclosure" that he is anxious to watch the Buffalo Bills play.

Watch:

11:56 a.m. ET, May 18, 2020

A 6th New York region will reopen tomorrow

State of Ne
State of Ne

Western New York is expected to enter phase one of the state's reopening plan tomorrow, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.

New York is opening region-by-region, and an area must meet seven metrics before it is allowed to reopen. Western New York needed to have at least 521 tracers ready for contact tracing before it could reopen, and officials identified 525 tracers over the weekend.

About New York's reopening plans: The state has outlined four phases of reopening, and regions will be allowed to move into stage one when they meet the metrics. Last week, five regions — Central New York, Finger Lakes, Mohawk Valley, North Country and Southern Tier — entered phase one.

Here's what can reopen in phase one:

  • Construction
  • Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting
  • Retail (for curbside or in-store pickup or drop off)
  • Manufacturing
  • Wholesale trade

Here's what the other three phases will look like:

  • Phase two: Professional services, retail, administrative support and real estate can reopen.
  • Phase three: Restaurants and food services can reopen.
  • Phase four: Arts, entertainment, recreation and education can reopen.

Watch:

11:49 a.m. ET, May 18, 2020

Hair salons and barber shops can reopen in Massachusetts next week

From CNN’s Carma Hassan

Barber Toi Phommachanh looks out the window of his closed barber shop called "Slick's on State" in Newburyport, MA on Monday, April 20.
Barber Toi Phommachanh looks out the window of his closed barber shop called "Slick's on State" in Newburyport, MA on Monday, April 20. Jim Davis/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

Starting on May 25, office spaces in Massachusetts can reopen at 25% of capacity — except in Boston — and retail establishments can offer curbside service. Personal services like barbershops and hair salons may be permitted to reopen if they follow the new guidelines.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker said in addition to reopening manufacturing facilities and construction sites, places of worship will also be permitted to reopen today. 

Each phase is expected to last at least three weeks and there will be four phases total, the governor said.

11:48 a.m. ET, May 18, 2020

106 people died yesterday from coronavirus in New York, governor says

At least 106 people died in New York state yesterday from Covid-19, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said. That is a decrease from the 139 reported on Saturday.

The governor said the daily death toll in New York, "is still painfully high at 106, but it is down, and in this world where we are looking for good news on a daily basis, that is good news."

Watch:

11:45 a.m. ET, May 18, 2020

Gov. Cuomo says he's negative for coronavirus

State of Ne
State of Ne

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he took a coronavirus test and is negative for the virus.

"So that is good news," he said at a news conference. "When you find out you're negative, it's actually a nice sense of relief."

Cuomo said he was not experiencing any symptoms.

He said the test was "easy" and he urged anyone with symptoms to get a test.

In March, Cuomo's brother, CNN anchor Chris Cuomo, tested positive for coronavirus.

Watch:

11:30 a.m. ET, May 18, 2020

Dallas mayor says more people are getting sick because of the state's reopening

From CNN's Chris Boyette

Mayor Eric Johnson speaks during a news conference at City Hall to discuss the coronavirus crisis in Dallas, on Wednesday, April 22.
Mayor Eric Johnson speaks during a news conference at City Hall to discuss the coronavirus crisis in Dallas, on Wednesday, April 22. Tony Gutierrez/AP

Dallas Mayor Eric Johnson attributed rising numbers in cases of Covid-19, at least in part, to the state’s reopening of businesses. 

“Well, more than likely what you saw in the cases jumping in the past few days that we've reported is a change in policy with respect to the reopening of parts of our economy, a couple weeks ago,” the mayor told CNN’s Alisyn Camerota on New Day. “These things sort of lag. The decision is made and then you don't see the result in the cases until a couple weeks later, so this is more than likely connected in some way to the opening of restaurants and movie theaters and retail and our malls up to 25% occupancy a couple weeks ago.”

More context: Texas saw its highest single-day increase in positive Covid-19 cases since the beginning of the pandemic this past Saturday, according to numbers released by Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS).

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has attributed an increase in coronavirus cases to more testing.

Here's what Johnson said:

 “I think there's a couple of things going on at the same time. You certainly have an increase in testing in some places. We're slowly ramping up our testing here in Dallas thankfully, but you also have changes in policy and so I think there's a few things working together at the same time to account for that increase in cases,” Johnson said.

Abbott is expected to announce more reopening measures on Monday afternoon, the governor said in a statement Sunday. 

11:25 a.m. ET, May 18, 2020

Whistleblower answered Trump's question about hydroxychloroquine in his formal complaint

From CNN's Marshall Cohen

Dr. Rick Bright, ousted director of vaccine agency, speaks at the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health hearing on "Protecting Scientific Integrity in the COVID-19 Response" on Thursday, May 14.
Dr. Rick Bright, ousted director of vaccine agency, speaks at the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health hearing on "Protecting Scientific Integrity in the COVID-19 Response" on Thursday, May 14. Michael Brochstein/Sipa/AP

In a tweet, President Trump asked this question about ousted vaccine director Rick Bright: "So the so-called HHS Whistleblower was against HYDROXYCHLOROQUINE. Then why did he make, and sign, an emergency use authorization?"

Bright answered that question in his formal whistleblower complaint, calling the authorization of the EUA a "compromise position."

Here's what it said in the complaint:

"Implementing the EUA was a compromise position, to rein in HHS leadership’s initial campaign to make the drugs available to the public outside of a hospital setting and without physician supervision. Dr. Bright and Dr. Woodcock ultimately prevailed upon their colleagues, and the FDA assisted BARDA in drafting an EUA request and provided it to Dr. Bright on the evening of March 28, 2020. Dr. Bright reviewed and edited the request letter to clarify that although he was being directed to sign the EUA request, it was not at his or BARDA’s behest."

The complaint added: "Dr. Bright opposed the broad use of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine as lacking scientific merit, even though the Administration promoted it as a panacea and demanded that New York and New Jersey be ‘flooded' with these drugs, which were imported from factories in Pakistan and India that had not been inspected by the FDA.”

Bright wrote in the complaint that his former agency was pressured by the administration to promote the drug as part of an "effort to score a short-term political victory" in the fight against the coronavirus.

“In an apparent effort to score a short-term political victory for the Administration during the escalating health crisis, the Office of the ASPR pressured BARDA to promote the malaria drug chloroquine as a therapeutic for COVID-19, despite a clear lack of scientific support.”
"Given the growing panic over the COVID-19 pandemic the desperation to find a cure, and the irresponsible public promotion of an unproven medicine Dr. Bright was extremely concerned about the prospect of chloroquine being made readily available to the public without close patient monitoring by medical professionals."