Coronavirus pandemic in the US

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9:14 a.m. ET, May 8, 2020

California's reopening starts today. Here's what's open now.

From CNN’s Paul LeBlanc and Jon Passantino

People hike on a trail at dusk in Los Angeles on May 7.
People hike on a trail at dusk in Los Angeles on May 7. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

California, the country's most populous state, is taking its first significant step in reopening its economy today, as part of a phased exit from the social distancing measures meant to mitigate the coronavirus pandemic. 

California was the first in the nation to issue a stay home order to all of its nearly 40 million residents, effective on March 19.

Dr. Mark Ghaly, the state’s Health and Human Services secretary, said yesterday that data showing stable hospitalization rates gave authorities confidence to move into this reopening stage. All reopenings in the state will be subject to active monitoring and surveillance, California Gov. Newsom said earlier this week. 

What’s allowed to reopen today: 

  • Select retailers with curbside pickup and delivery options, such as clothing stores, florists and bookstores
  • Some industries with workers spaced farther apart, using protective gear, sanitizing equipment

What’s not reopening yet: 

  • Offices, gyms, restaurants with dine-in service, shopping malls, museums, public beaches (except where approved with restrictions), in-person churches and salons 

What are big cities planning to do?

  • Los Angeles will be following the state’s easing of restrictions today, with the limited reopening of businesses. Parks, hiking trails, and golf courses will reopen tomorrow, but masks will be required.
  • San Francisco and the rest of the Bay Area have decided not to begin reopening just yet. The stay-at-home order for seven Bay Area jurisdictions, which began on March 17 and was extended on May 4, still remains in effects.
  • San Diego County will also follow state guidance on reopening.
9:12 a.m. ET, May 8, 2020

How Trump is reacting to the jobs report

From Joe Johns and Nikki Carvajal

President Donald Trump during a meeting at the White House on May 6.
President Donald Trump during a meeting at the White House on May 6. Evan Vucci/AP

Downplaying the seriousness of a devastating jobs report, President Trump said he “fully expected” high unemployment rates Friday morning.

The President was speaking over the phone to Fox News when the jobs numbers came down, showing a 14.7% unemployment rate across the US.

“It’s fully expected. There’s no surprise. Everyone knows that,” the President said, before jumping immediately to defend himself.

“Even the Democrats aren’t blaming me for that,” he said.

Trump went on to tout the strength of the economy before the pandemic, calling it the “best we’ve ever had.”

“Those jobs will all be back, and they’ll be back very soon,” the President said. “People are ready to go. We’ve got to get it open, and safely.”  

Watch:

8:48 a.m. ET, May 8, 2020

It's Friday morning. Here's the latest on the coronavirus pandemic in the US.

From CNN's Elise Hammond

Brian Waldret, co-owner of Hello Salon in Laveen, Arizona, disinfects surfaces in the salon on May 7, in preparation for reopening after being closed for several weeks due to the coronavirus.
Brian Waldret, co-owner of Hello Salon in Laveen, Arizona, disinfects surfaces in the salon on May 7, in preparation for reopening after being closed for several weeks due to the coronavirus. Ross D. Franklin/AP

It's Friday morning in the US. Here is what you need to know today:

  • The state of the economy: The Bureau of Labor Statistics' official jobs report was released this morning. It showed the unemployment rate rose to 14.7% as America lost 20.5 million jobs.
  • More than 40 states are at least partially reopened. But despite states loosening restrictions, there is still some confusion in terms of guidance from the federal government. The Trump administration has opted to ignore the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's lengthy set of recommendations for reopening America, which lays out more detailed suggestions than White House guidelines shared last month.
  • The unexpected consequences of a pandemic: As many as 75,000 Americans could die because of drug or alcohol misuse and suicide as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, according to an analysis conducted by the national public health group Well Being Trust.
  • Trump is being tested for coronavirus daily. This comes after CNN learned a member of the US Navy who serves as one of Trump's personal valets has tested positive, raising concerns about the President's possible exposure to the virus.
  • Nurses are protesting the lack of protective equipment. Frontline workers gathered in front of the White House and placed 88 pairs of empty shoes on the ground –– one pair for the life of each nurse they say has been lost due inadequate personal protective equipment while fighting the coronavirus.
8:38 a.m. ET, May 8, 2020

Trump says he has not yet taken an antibody test, but will "probably soon" 

From Nikki Carvajal

President Trump said he has not taken a test to see if he has antibodies for coronavirus.

“No, I haven’t but we’re getting that, and we’re leading in that too. We’re leading in everything,” the President told Fox News Friday morning. “And I will do that.” 

Trump said he will take the test “probably soon.” 

“Some people had it that don't even know they had it, who knows. But we are going to be the antibody test that's made tremendous progress and at some point probably soon, I will be,” he said. 
9:07 a.m. ET, May 8, 2020

April was the worst month for American jobs since the Great Depression

From CNN’s Anneken Tappe

Shuttered businesses are seen in Philadelphia on May 7.
Shuttered businesses are seen in Philadelphia on May 7. Matt Rourke/AP

America lost 20.5 million jobs in April as the coronavirus crisis devastated the country’s labor market, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on Friday.

It was the largest single month of job losses since the BLS began tracking the data in 1939.

The unemployment rate rose to 14.7%, the highest on record since the BLS began its monthly series in 1948.

Watch:

8:23 a.m. ET, May 8, 2020

The latest US jobs report will drop in 10 minutes

From CNN’S Anneken Tappe

A pedestrian walks by The Framing Gallery, closed due to the Covid-19 pandemic, in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, on May 7.
A pedestrian walks by The Framing Gallery, closed due to the Covid-19 pandemic, in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, on May 7. Paul Sancya/AP

The Bureau of Labor Statistics' official jobs report will be released at 8:30 a.m. ET this morning. 

Why it matters: The government's official jobs report will give one of the most comprehensive overviews of that economic fallout. It's expected to be a chilling report, showing layoffs surged and unemployment rose to Great Depression levels in April.

The report is meant to inform policymakers as they continue to respond to the crisis, and it will document how severely stay-at-home orders have hurt American workers.

The coronavirus pandemic has ravaged the US labor market, and 1 in 5 American workers have filed for first-time unemployment benefits since mid-March, when lockdown measures took effect across the country.

Another 3.2 million Americans filed initial jobless claims last week, after factoring in seasonal adjustments, the Department of Labor reported yesterday.

8:10 a.m. ET, May 8, 2020

JetBlue president says government needs to coordinate airline safety measures

From CNN's Adrienne Vogt

JetBlue President and COO Joanna Geraghty said that safety measures such as temperature checks need to be uniformly mandated by the government. 

Geraghty said it’s confusing for the public, when they start traveling again, if one airline implements specific safety measures while another does not. 

“There needs to be a global industry solution for this. Different standards for different airlines is going to be challenging for the traveling public. … Our recommendation is for the government to step in and handle that service,” she told CNN’s Erica Hill. 

JetBlue was the first major airline to require facial coverings, and Geraghty said the airline is offering empty seats next to passengers and undergoing deep cleanings. 

Geraghty said the airline industry has been “rocked to its core” and the company is working to conserve cash.

“There's some very small glimmers of light, but we're not overly optimistic about that,” she said. 

JetBlue is also offering a pair of flights to 100,000 New York health care workers.

"We wanted to make sure that they are among the first that are able to travel again. And many of them have had families impacted and have had [isolation] from their families. We wanted to make sure this ticket giveaway included recognizing those families that also have sacrificed in so many ways during this coronavirus pandemic," Geraghty said. 

Watch more:

8:08 a.m. ET, May 8, 2020

What to expect from this morning’s historic jobs report

From CNN’s Anneken Tappe

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics will release its official jobs report for April 2020 at 8:30 a.m. ET today, and it is expected to show devastation in the US labor force, with record-high job losses and unemployment on par with the Great Depression.

Record jobs drop expected: Economists polled by Refinitiv expect the US economy to shed 21.85 million jobs in April, by far the largest number on record. The US government's monthly jobs data dates back to 1939. 

Combined with job losses in March, April's layoffs would wipe out all jobs gained over the past decade.

Some historical context: Economists polled by Refinitiv also expect the unemployment rate to soar to 16%, the highest rate since the BLS started tracking monthly unemployment numbers in 1948. 

That's a level of joblessness not seen since the Great Depression in the 1930s, for which the BLS estimates annual data. Government economists estimate the unemployment rate peaked at 24.9% in 1933.

How we got here: The Covid-19 outbreak has torn through America over the past two months. People began working from home where possible in the second half of March, as businesses closed and schools suspended in-person teaching. As the lockdown dragged on, companies laid off and furloughed their staff.

5:51 a.m. ET, May 8, 2020

Nurses head to the White House to protest lack of protective equipment

From CNN's Shawna Mizelle

Members of National Nurses United demonstrate in Lafayette Park, across from the White House in Washington, on May 7. They are standing among 88 pairs of empty shoes representing nurses whom they say have died from Covid-19.
Members of National Nurses United demonstrate in Lafayette Park, across from the White House in Washington, on May 7. They are standing among 88 pairs of empty shoes representing nurses whom they say have died from Covid-19. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Nurses rallied in front of the White House on Thursday morning to protest the lack of personal protective equipment available to them in the battle against the novel coronavirus.

The demonstrators gathered in Lafayette Square in front of the White House and placed 88 pairs of empty shoes on the ground. Those shoes represented the life of each nurse they say has been lost due inadequate personal protective equipment while fighting the coronavirus.

The demonstrators then read the names of the 88 fallen nurses.

"You talk about how essential, how needed, how grateful you are, and yet you throw us to the wolves. You throw us out onto a battlefield without armor and the more we complain we don't see anything being done," said Jean Ross, president of National Nurses United, in an interview with CNN.

The union's website said the protest was meant to demand "that the administration do more to protect frontline health care workers around the country." The union represents 155,000 nurses around the country and has been vocal throughout the coronavirus pandemic.