Coronavirus pandemic in the US

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1:54 p.m. ET, April 28, 2020

Iowa governor says it's "essential, critical" to keep meat processing facilities open

From CNN’s Gregory Lemos

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds announces updates on Covid-19 in Iowa on April 24, in Johnston, Iowa.
Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds announces updates on Covid-19 in Iowa on April 24, in Johnston, Iowa. Olivia Sun/The Des Moines Register/AP

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds said Monday her state is doing everything it can to keep the meat supply chain up and running.

“This is essential, critical to keeping the food supply chain moving, “ she said at her daily news briefing.

When asked about recent outbreaks in meat processing facilities in her state, Reynolds pointed to the fact Iowa produces 10% of nation’s food supply.

“We have a role and obligation from our farmers, to our processors, to our supply chain to continue to feed the world and keep food on the plate,” the governor said. 

Reynolds said the meat processing plants are working with the state to ensure proper safety measures are being taken to protect both the workers and the supply chain.

She said temperature checks, mandatory face masks, partitions, new attendance policies, and social distancing are being used to keep workers safe.

Reynolds issued a warning if processing plants are closed down saying, “We're going to really be dealing with some significant issues going forward not only from a food supply, protein effort, but the cost of food as well.”

1:34 p.m. ET, April 28, 2020

There are more than 990,000 cases of coronavirus in the US

A medical professional administers a coronavirus test at a drive-thru testing site at Cambridge Health Alliance Somerville Hospital on April 28, in Somerville, Massachusetts.
A medical professional administers a coronavirus test at a drive-thru testing site at Cambridge Health Alliance Somerville Hospital on April 28, in Somerville, Massachusetts. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

There has been at least 994,625 cases of coronavirus in the US, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.

At least 56,749 people have died from the virus.

The totals include cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases.

1:31 p.m. ET, April 28, 2020

Grammy-nominated gospel singer dies from coronavirus complications

From CNN's Lisa France

Troy Sneed, Grammy-nominated gospel singer, dies from coronavirus complications.
Troy Sneed, Grammy-nominated gospel singer, dies from coronavirus complications. Tim Dahn/Emtro Gospel

Troy Sneed, a Grammy nominated gospel singer and record label founder, has died of complications from Covid-19, his publicist Bill Carpenter confirmed to CNN.

Sneed was 52.

Known for gospel radio hits, including "My Heart Says Yes" and "Worked It Out," Sneed died Monday at a hospital in Jacksonville, Florida.

1:26 p.m. ET, April 28, 2020

Trump says he'll sign executive order related to food supply

From CNN's Maegan Vazquez

President Trump said Tuesday that he expects to sign an executive order later in the day related to the food supply chain.

“We’re going to sign an executive order today, I believe, and that’ll solve any liability problems,” Trump told reporters during an Oval Office spray with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis.

The President said the administration is working with Tyson Foods on the issue. 

The President also underscored that “there’s plenty of supply. It’s distribution.”

“It was a unique circumstance because of liability,” he added.

The President did not provide any further details.

1:30 p.m. ET, April 28, 2020

Daily coronavirus deaths in Georgia projected to nearly double by August, model suggests

From CNN's Jacqueline Howard

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp speaks to the media during a press conference at the Georgia State Capitol on April 27, in Atlanta.
Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp speaks to the media during a press conference at the Georgia State Capitol on April 27, in Atlanta. Kevin C Cox/Getty Images

As some states start to reopen, Georgia is projected to see its number of daily coronavirus deaths nearly double by early August, according to a model shared by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and created by independent researcher Youyang Gu.

The epidemiological model provides projections for 40 countries and every US state.

Out of the 12 states in the US Southeast –– Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia –– the model’s projections for Georgia are the only projections that assume statewide social distancing will be relaxed starting on May 1 to reflect Gov. Brian Kemp's orders to reopen the state.

The projections for the state of Georgia show the highest uptick in deaths per day between May and August for the region.

With the assumption of relaxed social distancing, the model predicts that the number of Covid-19 deaths per day in Georgia will jump from 32 people dying on May 1 to a projected 63 people dying per day by August 4. 

Currently, a total of 995 people have died from Covid-19 in Georgia, according to the model, and it projects that number could climb to 4,691 by August 4. 

The projection for total deaths in the state provides a range of estimates between 1,686 deaths on the lower end to up to 15,620 deaths on the higher end.

1:28 p.m. ET, April 28, 2020

Trump says administration working with airlines to conduct coronavirus tests on international travelers

From CNN's Maegan Vazquez

President Donald Trump speaks at the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC on April 28.
President Donald Trump speaks at the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC on April 28. Mandel

President Trump said Tuesday that his administration is working with airlines to conduct temperature checks and coronavirus tests on international passengers coming into the United States.

Trump said during an Oval Office meeting with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis that the US is “setting up a system where we do some testing and we’re working with the airlines on that, testing on the plane, getting on the plane.”

The President also said his team is “looking at” and will “probably” require testing and face masks on international flights.  

The President claimed he did that “with China” and Europe, but coronavirus tests haven’t necessarily been administered to passengers from those areas traveling into the US Health screenings, including temperature checks, have been conducted on international travelers.

At one point, the President raised the possibility of travel restrictions on Latin America but appeared to back off.

1:36 p.m. ET, April 28, 2020

Cuomo: New Yorkers need to "protect and respect" essential workers

From CNN's Maureen Chowdhury

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the state needs to prioritize testing for frontline essential workers for the coronavirus.

He added that New Yorkers need to "protect and respect" them.

“They do have a higher rate of infection because they are putting themselves in harms way and we want to make sure they have the testing so we have an earlier alert system,” Cuomo said.

The governor said that essential workers make sure everyone is protected, “they have to be at the top of the list.”

1:11 p.m. ET, April 28, 2020

Businesses in Massachusetts will stay closed until May 18, governor says

From CNN's Joe Sutton

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker looks on during a press briefing on the coronavirus pandemic at the Massachusetts State House in Boston on April 27.
Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker looks on during a press briefing on the coronavirus pandemic at the Massachusetts State House in Boston on April 27. Chris Van Buskirk/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Nonessential businesses in Massachusetts will stay closed until May 18, Gov. Charlie Baker announced today at a news conference.

“We are extending the timeline for all nonessential businesses to keep the physical workplaces and facilities closed to all workers, customers and the public until May 18, and the state-at-home advisory also remains in place during this time," Baker said.

Baker said the ban on gatherings of 10 or more people will also be extended until May 18.

“I know pushing these dates back a couple of weeks is probably not what many people want to hear," he said.

In the meantime, the state is forming a reopening advisory board to create a phased plan.

The state's lieutenant governor and the secretary of housing and economic development will lead the board, the governor announced. 

The advisory board has been asked to produced their plan by May 18.

1:07 p.m. ET, April 28, 2020

Trump says he will "check" on whether he received coronavirus warnings earlier this year

From CNN's Betsy Klein

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting at the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC on April 28.
President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting at the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC on April 28. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump said Tuesday he would "check" on whether he received warnings about the coronavirus outbreak during briefings in January and February.

“I’d have to check. I would have to check. I want to look to the exact dates of warnings,” Trump said during a meeting with Gov. Ron DeSantis in the Oval Office. 

He cited the China travel ban as a sign he took the threat of the virus seriously.

“But I can tell you this, when I did the ban on China, almost everybody was against me, including Republicans. They thought it was far too harsh, that it wasn’t necessary. Professionals, Republicans and Democrats: almost everybody disagreed, and that was done really early,” he said.

Some background: The Washington Post reported Monday that Trump received more than a dozen warnings about the coronavirus outbreak in daily briefings in January and February, but continued to downplay the virus' threat and severity. 

Citing current and former US officials, the paper reported that the warnings came in the President's Daily Brief, a summary of intelligence reports from the various agencies, which tracked the virus' proliferation, highlighted China's inaccurate characterization of the disease and its death toll and warned of potential widespread ramifications related to the pandemic.

Officials told the Post that the President, who frequently forgoes the briefings and has become impatient with the summaries of the brief he now receives a couple of times per week, did not seem to absorb the warnings. They added that focused efforts tracking the virus were on par with prior instances of monitoring security threats, including active terrorism and international clashes.

An official in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, which manages the briefing, told the Post that "the detail of this is not true" and declined to explain or elaborate. CNN has reached out to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence for comment.