Tropical Storm Isaias nears Florida

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12:48 p.m. ET, August 2, 2020

Power outages affect 27,400 customers in South Florida

From CNN's Melissa Alonso

There are 2,160 power outages affecting 27,400 customers in Florida today as Tropical Storm Isaias continues to move closer to the state's coast, according to the Florida Power & Light (FPL) outage map.

Palm Beach County currently has the most power outages in the state with 720 reported and 9,910 customers affected, the FPL outage map showed. 

Broward County has 570 outages affecting 7,430 FPL customers. In Miami-Dade, there are 290 outages with 4,490 customers affected as of noon, the map showed.

2:23 p.m. ET, August 2, 2020

New York governor urges local governments to get ready for Tropical Storm Isaias

From CNN's Sheena Jones

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during a media briefing on July 23 in New York City.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during a media briefing on July 23 in New York City. Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is calling on local governments to get ready for the possibility of Tropical Storm Isaias hitting the area Monday night into Tuesday morning, he said during a press call Sunday.

Although he says it isn’t expected to be a hurricane when it hits New York, Isaias can still drop 3 inches of rain and bring 50 mph winds.

The storm should be over by Wednesday morning and it is expected to hit Long island and the Hudson area, he said.

The state is preparing generators and vehicles that can withstand heavy water.

11:52 a.m. ET, August 2, 2020

Tropical storm warnings issued for more of the Carolinas

From CNN's Brandon Miller

Tropical storm warnings have been extended northward to Surf City, North Carolina, according to the 11 a.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center.

A tropical storm watch was also issued for the North Carolina coast, north of Surf City to Duck, North Carolina – this includes the entire Outer Banks.

The tropical storm warning has been discontinued south of Jupiter Inlet in Florida, which means West Palm Beach is no longer under a watch or warning for tropical storm conditions. 

Tropical storm-force-winds are spreading over the Florida coast from Jupiter Inlet to Vero Beach, and those will continue to spread northward along the coast as the day moves on.

Some context: Tropical Storm Isaias continues to be a strong system with sustained winds of 65 mph and is expected to maintain this intensity as it moves up the Florida coast over the next 24 hours.

10:31 a.m. ET, August 2, 2020

North Carolina's Cape Hatteras National Seashore Park to close ahead of Tropical Storm Isaias

From CNN’s Artemis Moshtaghian

Based on forecasts for Tropical Storm Isaias, facilities at Cape Hatteras National Seashore in North Carolina will be closed starting today, according to a statement released by the National Park.  

The Cape, which preserves the portion of the Outer Banks of North Carolina from Bodie Island to Ocracoke Island, is home to the nation’s tallest brick beacon.

 

10:20 a.m. ET, August 2, 2020

Tropical Storm Isaias expected impact arrival times

From CNN's Virginia Langmaid and Brandon Miller

Palm Beach County Fire Rescue look out at the ocean as Tropical Storm Isaias passes through the area on Sunday, August 2 in Juno Beach, Florida.
Palm Beach County Fire Rescue look out at the ocean as Tropical Storm Isaias passes through the area on Sunday, August 2 in Juno Beach, Florida. Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Tropical Storm Isaias is located around 40 miles southeast of West Palm Beach, Florida and is moving northwest at 8 mph as of 8 a.m. ET.

The storm will move up the east coast of Florida throughout the day, bringing strong winds, storm surge and heavy rainfall to the east coast of the state.

The center of the storm is forecast to hug the coast, and the official National Hurricane Center track has the center within 5-10 miles for much of the afternoon and evening as it moves northward past Port St. Lucie, Melbourne, Titusville and eventually Daytona Beach by early Monday morning.

Here are some more projections from CNN's weather team:

Freeport, Bahamas

Tropical storm winds window: happening now - noon

Storm peak time: 9 a.m. - 10 a.m. Sunday

Peak wind gusts expected: 50+ mph

Expected rainfall totals: 1 - 2 inches 

West Palm Beach, Florida

Tropical storm winds window: now - 2 p.m. Sunday

Storm peak time: 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Sunday

Peak wind gusts expected: 70 - 75mph

Expected rainfall totals: 1 - 2 inches 

Melbourne, Florida

Tropical storm winds window: 1 p.m. - 2 a.m. Monday

Storm peak time: 4 p.m. Sunday - 10 p.m. Sunday

Peak wind gusts expected: 65 - 70mph

Expected rainfall totals: 2 - 3 inches 

Daytona Beach, Florida

Tropical storm winds window: Midnight - 8 a.m. Monday

Storm peak time: 2 a.m. - 6 a.m. Monday

Peak wind gusts expected: 60 - 65mph

Expected rainfall totals: 2 - 3 inches 

Charleston, South Carolina

Tropical storm winds window: 4 p.m. Monday - 12 a.m. Tuesday

Storm peak time: 8 p.m. - 11 p.m. Monday

Peak wind gusts expected: 65 - 70mph

Expected rainfall totals: 4 - 5 inches 

Wilmington, North Carolina

Tropical storm winds window: 12 a.m. - 7 a.m. Tuesday

Storm peak time: 2 a.m. - 6 a.m. Tuesday

Peak wind gusts expected: 55 - 60mph

Expected rainfall totals: 3 - 4 inches

 

9:04 a.m. ET, August 2, 2020

Isaias is close to Florida now, and it could batter the rest of the East Coast later this week

Isaias' center is expected to move within miles of Florida's east coast today. While it's not clear if the storm will make landfall in the US, the possibility can't be ruled out, CNN meteorologist Allison Chinchar said.

So what happens after that? The storm's center could affect the Carolinas' coast by early Tuesday — and current forecasts show a landfall over the coastal Carolinas is possible.

The storm then could move along the coasts of the mid-Atlantic and Northeastern states from Tuesday into Wednesday.

The governors of Florida, North Carolina and Virginia have declared states of emergency, allowing officials to move resources and equipment for recovery.

8:15 a.m. ET, August 2, 2020

How Florida prepped for a hurricane in the middle of a pandemic

From CNN's Jason Hanna and Amir Vera

Member of Florida House of Representatives Vance Aloupis (center) puts sand bags in a resident's car trunk in Palmetto Bay near Miami, on Friday as Floridians prepare for Hurricane Isaias.
Member of Florida House of Representatives Vance Aloupis (center) puts sand bags in a resident's car trunk in Palmetto Bay near Miami, on Friday as Floridians prepare for Hurricane Isaias. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Isaias is continuing toward Florida, and the storm comes at a sensitive time during the coronavirus pandemic. On Friday, Florida marked the fourth consecutive day it reported a record number of Covid-19 deaths in the state at 257.

Florida closed some state-supported Covid-19 drive-through and walk-up testing sites on Thursday in anticipation of the storm.

Testing is shut down in Miami and will likely stay that way until Tuesday or Wednesday, Miami Mayor Francis Suarez told CNN Friday.

"That's going to be a gap in information for four or five days," Suarez said.

Here's what else Florida is doing to prep for a hurricane in the middle of a pandemic:

  • Safety at shelters: In Palm Beach County, Mayor Dave Kerner said a zone that primarily has mobile homes will be evacuated. The county will open six shelters Saturday morning at area schools and a recreation center, Kerner said. Kerner said the shelters would feature coronavirus precautions. Those taking shelter will have their temperatures checked, and will be divided into family units. Masks will be provided as needed and law enforcement will help enforce social distancing, he said.
  • Extra PPE: Thousands of kits with personal protective equipment are being sent to shelters in counties that are in the storm's path, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Saturday.
  • Possible power delays: Power outages could last longer than usual because of the pandemic, Florida Power & Light spokesman Bryan Garner said. That's partly because restoration teams are taking time and space for health precautions, he said. They're social distancing, working in small groups, sanitizing equipment and going through temperature checks and health screenings, Garner said.