Barry makes landfall in Louisiana

1:57 p.m. ET, July 13, 2019

Hurricane Barry has made landfall in Louisiana

Barry made landfall in Louisiana near Intracoastal City and weakened to a tropical storm with 70 mph winds, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Barry was a hurricane when it made landfall — but it immediately weakened to a tropical storm.

The storm will continue to push inland, currently moving to the northwest at 6 mph.

1:41 p.m. ET, July 13, 2019

Hurricane Barry is expected to make landfall soon. Here's what we know so far.

Barry strengthened into a Category 1 hurricane Saturday morning. The center of the storm located 40 mph south of Lafayette, Louisiana.

The storm is expected to make landfall soon. Here's how the storm has already affected the Gulf Coast:

  • Flooding: Myrtle Grove, Louisiana is already feeling the effects of the hurricane. One of the two levees is overtopping, and Louisiana's lt. governor said the levee will only be able to withstand a few hours of overflowing before it breaches. Other cities across the state are also experiencing flooding.
  • Power outages: More than 77,000 customers are without power in Louisiana. There have been reports of downed trees and power lines.
  • The airport: No flights are taking off from New Orleans International Airport. Airlines have cancelled all flights to and from the airport. So far, there has been no reported damage to the infrastructure.
1:22 p.m. ET, July 13, 2019

The New Orleans airport is open — but no flights are taking off

Kevin Dolliole, the director of aviation at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, said that while the airport is open today, all airline flight departures have been cancelled.

The airlines anticipate resuming operations tomorrow; when and how much will vary from carrier to carrier, he said.

So far, there's no issues with airport terminal or infrastructure.

 

12:56 p.m. ET, July 13, 2019

A levee is overflowing in Myrtle Grove. Here's what it looks like.

Flood waters are rushing over the top of a levee in Myrtle Grove, Louisiana, as Hurricane Barry creeps closer to the coast.

The levee can withstand a few hours of overtopping before it breaches, Louisiana Lt. Gov. Billy Nungesser told CNN. But, he said if the levee fails, a large part of Plaquemines Parish could flood.

Here's what the levee looks like:

Plaquemines Parish Sheriffs Department
Plaquemines Parish Sheriffs Department
Plaquemines Parish Sheriffs Department
Plaquemines Parish Sheriffs Department
Plaquemines Parish Sheriffs Department
Plaquemines Parish Sheriffs Department

12:15 p.m. ET, July 13, 2019

A majority of roads in Grand Isle are covered with water, Coast Guard says

Grand Isle, Louisiana, is already feeling with the effects of Hurricane Barry.

The US Coast Guard said a majority of the town's roads are covered with water and some are impassable. Power has also been out since Friday afternoon, and downed power lines have been reported.

What we know about the storm: The center of the storm as of 11 a.m. ET was about 40 miles south of Lafayette, Louisiana, and about 50 miles west of Morgan City, Louisiana, with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph and creeping at 6 mph.

The storm — the first hurricane to hit the US this year — was unloading powerful winds and heavy rain ahead of its expected landfall.

12:00 p.m. ET, July 13, 2019

This is what it looks like along the Louisiana coast

Hurricane Barry is expected to make landfall within the next few hours along the Louisiana coast.

Here's what it looks like right now:

This sign reading "God Please Lower The Water" was spotted on a floodgate in Morgan City.

SETH HERALD/AFP/Getty Images
SETH HERALD/AFP/Getty Images

Power poles appeared to be laying on top of homes in Cut Off, Louisiana. 

Angela Orgeron took this photo of downed trees in Golden Meadow.

11:58 a.m. ET, July 13, 2019

More than 77,000 customers without power in Louisiana

Traffic lights are seen without power in Morgan City, Louisiana, on July 13,2019.
Traffic lights are seen without power in Morgan City, Louisiana, on July 13,2019. SETH HERALD/AFP/Getty Images

At least 77,875 Louisiana residents are without power as Hurricane Barry nears landfall.

Entergy has the highest number of outages at 59,952 and Cleco Power reported 15,640.

More than 50% of residents are without power in Terrebonne, Assumption and St. Mary Parishes.