Live Updates

May 26 Texas shooting news

Parents seen frustrated with police at shooting scene in new video
06:08

What we covered here

  • Nineteen children and two teachers were killed in a shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Tuesday, officials said.
  • The 18-year-old gunman was not confronted by a school resource officer outside the building, officials now say, and he apparently entered through an unlocked door. Police officers who arrived and confronted the shooter called for more resources, an official said. After about an hour, tactical teams forced entry and fatally shot the suspect, officials said as questions about the timeline continue to surface.
  • Just before the mass shooting, the shooter allegedly texted a teenage girl about his intentions to attack. Authorities said he shot his grandmother before heading to the elementary school. She remains hospitalized.
  • President Biden and the first lady will visit Uvalde on Sunday, the White House said, to meet with families who lost loved ones and speak to community leaders.
  • Here are ways you can offer support.

See full coverage of the Texas school shooting here.

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Catch up on the latest details about Tuesday's mass shooting at Robb Elementary School

Local law enforcement authorities on Thursday provided a more detailed timeline for Tuesday’s mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, that left 19 children and two adults dead. But many questions remain unanswered.

Victor Escalon, South Texas regional director for the Department of Public Safety, told reporters Thursday that they are “still grabbing a lot of information” regarding the shooting.

“We’re going to find out. With all the different agencies that are involved, we’re working every angle that’s available. We won’t stop until we get all the answers that we possibly can,” he said during a news conference.

Meanwhile, the White House announced that President Biden and first lady Jill Biden will visit Uvalde on Sunday to meet with families who lost loved ones and speak to community members and religious leaders.

If you’re just catching up on the latest developments, here are key things to know:

What authorities revealed today about the timeline of events inside and outside the school:

  • Escalon said that the suspect, Salvador Ramos, shot his grandmother and then wrecked his truck in a ditch outside the school at 11:28 a.m. local time Tuesday. He exited the truck with a rifle and shot at two people across the street, Escalon said.
  • The gunman then approached the school and shot at the building multiple times and walked in through an apparently unlocked door at 11:40 a.m. local time, according to Escalon.
  • That door is normally locked, “unless you are leaving to go home on the school bus,” former principal Ross McGlothlin told CNN’s Newsroom on Thursday.
  • Escalon said the gunman was not confronted by a school resource officer outside the school. The same law enforcement agency previously said an officer had “engaged” him. “He walked in unobstructed initially,” Escalon said. According to the current information available, Escalon said there was not an armed officer readily available.
  • Inside, the suspect walked into a classroom and fired more than 25 times, Escalon said. The majority of the gunfire was in the beginning of the attack, he added.
  • Officers arrived at the school at 11:44 a.m. local time, but when they went to confront the gunman, they received fire and took cover, Escalon said. They called for more resources and personnel, evacuated students and teachers in other parts of the school, and at some point entered “negotiations” with the suspect, he said.
  • A US Border Patrol tactical team came to the classroom, forced entry and fatally shot the suspect after about an hour, he said.
  • Thursday’s news conference underscored the confusion and disorganization of the police response and failed to answer questions as to how the gunman was able to remain inside the classroom for such a long time.
  • CNN reported Thursday that the Uvalde school district, where the shooting occurred, had a safety plan that included its own police force, social media monitoring and a threat reporting system to “provide a safe and secure environment” for students. The two-page document on the district’s website lists 21 different measures that it says it has undertaken for the safety of the school community, ranging from an app for reporting bullying to physical security measures, like fencing and a buzz-in door system. It’s not clear to what degree the plan was developed with active shooters in mind.

Officials defend response:

  • Uvalde Police Chief Daniel Rodriguez issued a statement Thursday defending his officers’ response to the shooting. Two responding officers were shot by the suspect but are expected to survive. “It is important for our community to know that our officers responded within minutes” alongside school resource officers, he said.
  • The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS), meanwhile, said officers who responded to the shooting saved lives, despite waiting before physically confronting the suspect who was holed up inside a classroom. A spokesperson for the agency said that officers did not have enough information on the exact location of the shooter to do an immediate takedown.

Details about the identified victims:

  • Makenna Lee Elrod, 10, loved to play softball, do gymnastics and spend time with her family. “Her smile would light up a room,” Allison McCullough, Makenna’s aunt, told ABC News. McCullough described her niece as a natural leader who loved school and was “a light to all who knew her.”
  • Jayce Luevanos, 10, has been identified as one of the victims by CNN through a GoFundMe site set up to raise funds for funeral expenses and family needs. Jayce’s grandfather, Carmelo Quiroz, told USA Today, the Jayce and his mother lived with him. He said the 10-year-old was happy and loved. “He was our baby,” Quiroz said.
  • Alithia Ramirez, 10, was in fourth grade and loved to draw, her father, Ryan Ramirez, told CNN affiliate KSAT. He said she wanted to be an artist.
  • Jailah Nicole Silguero, 10, enjoyed dancing and making TikTok videos, her mother Veronica Luevanos told CNN network partner, Univision. Jailah did not want to go to school Tuesday morning and asked to stay home, but Luevanos said she told her no.
  • Jacklyn Jaylen Cazares and Annabell Guadalupe Rodríguez, both 10, were cousins, classmates and friends. Jacklyn’s father Jacinto Cazares told reporters that she “was full of love and full of life. She would do anything for anybody. And to me, she’s a little firecracker, man.”
  • Nevaeh Alyssa Bravo, 10, put a smile on everyone’s face, her cousin, Austin Ayala, told the Washington Post, adding that her family is devastated.
  • Lexi Rubio, 10, has been identified by her parents as one of the victims. Felix and Kimberly Rubio celebrated their daughter making the All-A honor roll and getting a good citizen award at Robb Elementary on Tuesday, shortly before the shooting. In a text message to CNN, Felix and Kimberly Rubio said, “She was kind, sweet, and appreciated life. She was going to be an all-star in softball and had a bright future whether it’s sports or academic. Please let the world know we miss our baby.”
  • Jose Flores Jr., 10, was one of the victims, his father Jose Flores Sr. told CNN. Flores said his son was in the fourth grade and loved baseball and video games. “He was always full of energy,” Flores said. “Ready to play till the night.” Flores also described his son as an amazing kid and big brother to his two siblings. 
  • Uziyah Garcia, 10, has been identified as one of the victims, his family confirmed to CNN. He was in fourth grade, his aunt Nikki Cross told CNN. His uncle, Mitch Renfro, described Uziyah as a “great kid. Full of life. Loved anything with wheels, and video games.” He leaves behind two sisters. 
  • Eva Mireles, a fourth-grade teacher, was among those killed, her aunt, Lydia Martinez Delgado, told CNN. She had been an educator for 17 years and in her off time enjoyed running, hiking, biking and spending time with her family, according to her profile on the Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District website.
  • Irma Garcia, a fourth-grade teacher, has been identified as a victim and confirmed through a GoFundMe page. A wife and mother to four children, she was “Sweet, kind, loving. Fun with the greatest personality,” the page said, adding, “She sacrificed herself protecting the kids in her classroom. She was a hero.”
  • Xavier Lopez, 10, has been identified as one of the victims, his mother Felicha Martinez confirmed to the Washington Post. “He was funny, never serious and his smile,” Martinez told the paper. 
  • Amerie Jo Garza, 10, was identified by her father as one of the children killed. Angel Garza posted to Facebook early Wednesday: “My little love is now flying high with the angels above. Please don’t take a second for granted. Hug your family. Tell them you love them. I love you Amerie Jo. Watch over your baby brother for me,” said the father.
  • Eliana “Ellie” Garcia9, was among those killed, her family told KHOU. Rogelio Lugo and Nelda Lugo, Eliana’s grandparents, told the Los Angeles Times she loved the movie “Encanto,” cheerleading and basketball, and dreamed of becoming a teacher.
  • Eliahana “Elijah” Cruz Torres, 10, has been identified as one of the victims, her aunt Leandra Vera told CNN. “Our baby gained her wings,” Vera said.
  • Tess Marie Mata, 10, has been identified as one of the victims, her sister told the Washington Post. The fourth-grader loved TikTok dances, Ariana Grande and the Houston Astros, and was saving money so that the whole family could go to Disney World, her sister said.
  • All the fatalities and injuries took place inside one classroom at Robb Elementary, officials said. The conditions of the six hospitalized victims of the shooting have remained the same, according to hospital officials Thursday.
  • The two funeral homes in Uvalde will cover the cost of funerals for those who were killed Tuesday. Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District (UCISD) has opened a memorial fund to accept donations for those affected by the shooting.

Blocked bill in Washington:

  • Meanwhile in the nation’s capital, Senate Republicans on Thursday blocked a bill designed to combat domestic terrorism from advancing in a key vote. The vote comes as lawmakers are under intense pressure to take action in the wake of multiple recent episodes of horrific gun violence.
  • The bill passed the Democratic-controlled House last week following a tragic mass shooting at a supermarket in a predominately Black neighborhood in Buffalo, New York. But Republicans have pushed back against the measure put forward by Democrats, describing it as partisan and unnecessary. At least 10 Senate Republicans would have needed to vote with Democrats to overcome the 60-vote threshold imposed by the filibuster.
  • The failure of the domestic terrorism bill in the Senate underscores yet again how challenging it is for lawmakers to enact any kind of major policy change in the wake of mass shootings amid a highly polarized political environment and widespread GOP opposition to stricter gun controls.
  • Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called for the Senate to take up the House-passed bill, but acknowledged ahead of the vote that it was unlikely to advance amid GOP opposition. He indicated Democrats are willing to give some time and space for efforts to reach some kind of bipartisan compromise on gun legislation though he noted the odds are long. He also made clear that these efforts will not be given an unlimited amount of time to play out, and that if they fail the Senate will move forward with votes on gun safety legislation.
  • On the Republican side, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told CNN he met this morning with GOP Texas Sen. John Cornyn after Cornyn returned from Texas, and encouraged the senator to begin discussions with Democrats to see if they can find a middle ground on some legislation to respond to the shooting in Texas.

Read more about what we know — and don’t know — about the shooting here.

CNN’s Eric Levenson, Holly Yan, Joe Sutton, Clare Foran and Ted Barrett contributed reporting to this post.

Family of 10-year-old Alithia Ramirez says she wanted to be an artist: "She was a very talented little girl"

Alithia Ramirez, 10, has been identified as one of the victims killed in the Robb Elementary shooting.

Her father, Ryan Ramirez, confirmed the information to CNN affiliate KSAT. Alithia was in fourth grade, Ramirez said, and loved to draw and wanted to be an artist.

On Wednesday morning, Ryan posted to Facebook a photo of Alithia with angel wings.

Alithia’s grandmother, Rosa Maria Ramirez, told ABC News “she was a very talented little girl,” adding that “she loved to draw, she was real sweet.”

10-year-old Jayce Luevanos identified as school shooting victim

Jayce Luevanos has been identified as one of the victims in the Uvalde, Texas, shooting. CNN confirmed the information through a GoFundMe site set up to raise funds for funeral expenses and family needs.

“We are all deeply saddened by the news we received from the Robb School shooting. It breaks my heart having to create a fundraiser for such a need but Jayce’s parents, Christina and Jose Luevanos need as much help as possible in these terrible times,” Jesus Cardona, who organized the verified GoFundMe campaign, said on the site. 

Jayce’s grandfather, Carmelo Quiroz, told USA Today that the 10-year-old and his mother lived with him. He said Jayce was happy and loved. “He was our baby,” Quiroz said. 

Veronica Luevanos, Jayce’s aunt and mother of shooting victim Jailah Nicole Silguero, posted a picture Wednesday on Facebook of her daughter and Jayce and wrote: “My baby you didn’t deserve this neither did your classmates n cousin Jayce.”

Yankees and Rays tweet that they're using their channels "to offer facts about the impacts of gun violence"

The New York Yankees and Tampa Bay Rays – who are currently playing a game against each other – each posted tweets saying that the two clubs are collaborating and will use their channels “to offer facts about the impacts of gun violence” instead of focusing on game coverage.

“The devastating events that took place in Uvalde, Buffalo and countless other communities across our nation are tragedies that are intolerable,” both teams said in tweets.

Additionally, the Rays said the organization “has made a $50,000 commitment to Everytown for Gun Safety’s Support Fund.”

See some of their tweets:

Texas Department of Public Safety says officers saved lives in school, despite waiting to move on gunman

The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS), facing questions about how officers dealt with the gunman who killed 21 people at a school in Uvalde, Texas, Tuesday, says those officers saved lives, despite waiting before physically confronting the suspect who was holed up inside a classroom.

“At that point, they had the suspect contained inside the classroom,” DPS spokesperson Lt. Chris Olivarez told CNN Thursday. “If those officers weren’t there, if they did not maintain their presence, there is a good chance that gunman could have made it to other classrooms and commit more killings.” 

Olivarez said that officers did not have enough information on the exact location of the shooter to do an immediate takedown.

“They do not know where the gunman is. They are hearing gunshots, they are receiving gunshots,” said Olivarez. “At that point, if they proceeded any further not knowing where this suspect was at, they could have been shot. They could have been killed, and at that point, that gunman would have had the opportunity to kill other people inside that school.” 

Olivarez declined to explain the discrepancy between initial claims that a school resource officer “engaged” the gunman outside the school and Thursday’s statement saying Ramos was not confronted before entering the school.

“We’re conducting those investigations right now, speaking to witnesses, and those officers obviously are key to this investigation,” he told CNN.

Husband of teacher killed in Uvalde school shooting has died, according to nephew and GoFundMe post

Irma and Joe Garcia

The husband of Irma Garcia, one of the Robb Elementary teachers who was killed in Tuesday’s mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas, has died, according to a GoFundMe post and a Twitter post from Garcia’s nephew.

On the school’s website, Irma Garcia’s bio states that she and her husband had four children.

Joe Garcia “has tragically passed away this morning(5/26/2022) as a result of a medical emergency. Please keep our family in your thoughts and prayers. I truly believe Joe died of a broken heart and losing the love of his life of more than 25 years was too much to bear,” the GoFundMe post from Irma Garcia’s cousin said.  

Irma Garcia’s nephew also acknowledged the death of his aunt’s husband.

“Lord god please on our family, my tias husband passed away this morning due to a heart attack at home he’s with his wife now, these two will make anyone feel loved no matter what they have the purest hearts ever I love you sm tia and tio please be with me every step of the way,” the tweet said

CNN has reached out to the Garcia family for additional comment. 

10-year-old Makenna Lee Elrod identified as victim in school shooting: "Her smile would light up a room"

Makenna Lee Elrod, 10, has been identified as one of the victims in the Uvalde, Texas, school shooting, April Elrod, Makenna’s mother, confirmed to CNN.

Allison McCullough, Makenna’s aunt, also confirmed the information to ABC News. 

She added that Makenna loved to play softball, do gymnastics and spend time with her family. She was a natural leader and loved school. McCullough described her niece as “a light to all who knew her.”

“She loved her family and friends so much,” McCullough added.

Eyewitness describes the scene outside the Texas elementary school as the gunman opened fire

Derek Gonzales was about to go for lunch with his colleague Julio Luna when he heard gunshots on Tuesday. So he rushed to Robb Elementary School from his nearby shop with Luna.

What they saw upon arrival was a chaotic scene.

Gonzales said bullets were going into the direction of a nearby funeral home, and some were coming in his direction, he added. “We were like, in shock.”

He said he didn’t expect a shooting at the school and thought something else might have happened.

“We didn’t expect for this to happen here in Uvalde,” Luna added.

The two tried to get out of their car, but police told them to get back in.

In a news briefing earlier Thursday, Victor Escalon, South Texas regional director of Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS), told reporters that the gunman shot towards eyewitnesses across the street at a funeral home after he wrecked his car. The official said the shooter then continued to walk towards the school and climbed a fence.

Student's father pleaded with officers to give him a gun and vest so he could enter school to save children

Victor Luna, a parent of a student at Robb Elementary School

Victor Luna, a parent of a student at Robb Elementary School, said he pleaded with officers to give him their gear so he could go inside as the shooting was happening.

“I told one of the officers myself, if they didn’t want to go in there, let me borrow his gun and a vest, and I’ll go in there myself to handle it, and they told me no,” he told CNN, adding that he wanted the officers to “go in and get rid of that man, that shooter.”

“I mean, they took a while for them to go in there. So I mean this tragedy happened, like kids didn’t make it out,” he continued. “They were doing their job, but they could have done it quicker before that man went in the school.”

His son Jayden survived Tuesday’s mass shooting. He said he also had grandchildren in the school.

Luna told CNN that he saw some officers going in and out of the building, but he wanted to see more.

“In a situation like that they should have just all went in – I mean they’re innocent students in there. They could have gunned him down just like he did them when he walked in,” he said.

Luna noted that he had waited about two to three hours before they started bringing kids out of the school. “That was what was aggravating me, cause I want to see my son. I didn’t know what was going on he could have been in there dead,” he said.

Jayden is hurting and doesn’t want to be by himself, Luna added.

Derek Gonzalez, a witness to the scene, told CNN he saw “family members crying, screaming.”

“They were like give me the vest, you know, I’ll go in there,” he said. “And the cops were pushing people back to get out of the way.”

They were outside for what felt like “forever,” Gonzalez added. 

He said his aunt is a fourth-grade teacher in the same building. She survived and is “shaken up,” he said. His cousin lost his daughter, Amerie Garza, in the massacre.

Watch:

02:37

President Biden and first lady will visit Uvalde on Sunday, White House says

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden will visit Uvalde, Texas, on Sunday to meet with families who lost loved ones in the horrific mass shooting, as well as to meet with other community members and religious leaders, the White House announced.

“On Sunday, May 29, the President and the First Lady will travel to Uvalde, Texas to grieve with the community that lost twenty-one lives in the horrific elementary school shooting,” according to an advisory from the White House.

White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierr offered more details about the trip during a press briefing Thursday.

“While he’s there, the President will meet with the community leaders, religious leaders and the families of the victims. The President and first lady believe it is important to show their support for the community during this devastating time and to be there for the families of the victims,” Jean-Pierre told reporters at the White House. 

Jean-Pierre also urged Congress to take action and lamented the loss of life from Tuesday’s terrible mass shooting that killed 19 children and two adults. 

“Schools should be sanctuaries of learning, not battlefields,” Jean-Pierre said. “These were elementary school kids — they should be losing their first teeth. Not losing their lives. They should be at little league, softball, and soccer practices this weekend. These parents should be planning their kids’ summer, not their child’s funeral.”

She added: “Teachers should be there to teach, nurture, and prepare our children for the future. Not to be gunned down or asked to sacrifice their own lives for the kids they love. But that is what two heroic teachers did in Uvalde — killed while trying to protect their students.”

Jean-Pierre continued: “As the President said this week it is time to turn this pain into action. It’s time for Congress to act.”

Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, visited Uvalde to offer "condolences and support in person," spokesperson says  

Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, places flowers at a makeshift memorial outside Uvalde County Courthouse in Uvalde, Texas, on Thursday, May 26.

Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, visited Uvalde, Texas, on Thursday where a gunman killed 19 children and two teachers at an elementary school on Tuesday, a spokesperson for the Duchess told CNN.

“She took this trip in a personal capacity as a mother, to offer her condolences and support in person to a community experiencing unimaginable grief,” the spokesperson said. 

10-year-old Jailah Nicole Silguero did not want to go to school the day she was killed

Ten-year-old Jailah Nicole Silguero has been identified as one of the victims of the Robb Elementary School shooting, her mother Veronica Luevanos told CNN network partner, Univision.

Luevanos said her daughter did not want to go to school Tuesday morning and asked to stay home, but she said no.

In tearful interview, Luevanos said Jailah enjoyed dancing and making TikTok videos.

Nancy Salazar, a family friend, started a GoFundMe page to help the parents and wrote that Jailah “was a Delighted, energetic, Lovely little girl.”

Fourth-grader Jacklyn Jaylen Cazares and her cousin were killed in the Texas school shooting

Jacklyn Jaylen Cazares.

Jacklyn Jaylen Cazares has been identified as one of the victims of Tuesday’s mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas, according to posts by her family on social media.

Jacklyn was killed along with her cousin Annabell Guadalupe Rodriguez. They were cousins, friends and classmates in their fourth-grade class at Robb Elementary School.

“She was full of life and full of love. She touched a lot of people. Recently, she had her first baptism, her first communion. Through COVID, through the death of a family member a year ago, it brought us together and it was something beautiful. And now, we’re being brought together, but it is in tragedy,” her father Jacinto Cazares told reporters in a video distributed by Reuters.

“She was full of love and full of life. She would do anything for anybody. And to me, she’s a little firecracker, man. It comforts me a little bit to think she would be the one to help her friends in need,” he said.

In an interview with The Washington Post, Javier Cazares said that he and others wanted to rush the building to retrieve their children as they heard gunshots from inside.

Cazares told The Washington Post he arrived at the Robb Elementary School Tuesday soon after hearing something was going on at his daughter’s school. He added that he was joined near the building’s front door by several other men who had children at the school.

“There were five or six of [us] fathers, hearing the gunshots, and [police officers] were telling us to move back,” Cazares told the paper. “We didn’t care about us. We wanted to storm the building. We were saying, ‘Let’s go,’ because that is how worried we were, and we wanted to get our babies out.”

Texas official provides timeline of gunman's actions outside and inside the school during shooting

Law enforcement works on scene at Robb Elementary School on May 25 in Uvalde, Texas.

The Texas elementary school shooter also fired at witnesses across the street from his vehicle before heading to the Robb Elementary campus in Uvalde, Texas, according to Victor Escalon, South Texas regional director for the Department of Public Safety.

“At 11:28 a.m. [local time,] he’s sitting there at the ditch” where he crashed his vehicle, Escalon detailed at a news briefing Thursday as he provided a timeline of events. “He jumps out the passenger side of his truck. According to witnesses, he’s got a long arm rifle and a bag. Later we find out it’s ammunition.”

“He walks around, he sees two witnesses at the funeral home across the street from where he wrecked [his vehicle]. He engages and fires towards them. He continues walking towards the school. He climbs a fence. Now he’s in the parking lot, shooting at the school. Multiple times,” he added.

At 11:40 a.m. local time, the shooter walked into the west side of Robb Elementary School and shot multiple rounds, Escalon continued.

The Texas Department of Public Safety official said the gunman was not confronted by a school resource officer outside the school, and apparently entered an unlocked door. The same law enforcement agency previously said an officer had “engaged” him.

“Four minutes later, local police departments, Uvalde Police Department, the Independent School District Police Department are inside, making entry. They hear gunfire, they take rounds, they move back, get cover. And during that time, they approach where the suspect is at,” Escalon explained.

“According to the information I have, he went in at 11:40, he walks approximate 20 feet, 30 feet, he makes a right and walks into the hallway, he makes a right, walks another 20 feet, turns left into a schoolroom – into a classroom and that has doors opened in the middle,” Escalon says.

These officers were not able to make entry initially, Escalon said, “because of the gunfire they’re receiving.” They called for backup and additional resources, while the evacuation of children and teachers in other classrooms was underway, he added.

A Zavala county deputy and members of the Uvalde Police Department also made entry into the classroom, Escalon said, and also shot the suspect.

The scene of the shooting then immediately turned into a “rescue operation,” Escalon said.

“How do we save these children? Some made it out — we don’t have a hard number yet but that was our goal,” he said.

Gunman "was not confronted by anybody" while entering school, Texas official says

The gunman who killed 19 children and two teachers in Robb Elementary School was not confronted by a school resource officer, according to Victor Escalon, South Texas regional director for the Department of Public Safety.

“It was reported that a school district police officer confronted the suspect that was making entry. Not accurate. He walked in unobstructed initially. So, from the grandmother’s house to the bar ditch to the school, into the school, he was not confronted by anybody. To clear the record on that. Four minutes later, law enforcement are coming in to solve this problem,” Escalon said during a news conference.

He said he “wanted to clear that up” amid reports to the contrary.

Escalon also said the school also appeared to be unlocked when the gunman entered.

“We will find out as much as we can why it was unlocked — or maybe it was locked. But right now, it appears it was unlocked,” he said.

Texas official says investigators are "still grabbing a lot of information" about the school massacre

Victor Escalon speaks at a press conference in Uvalde, Texas on May 26.

Victor Escalon, South Texas regional director for the Department of Public Safety, said “we’re still grabbing a lot of information” regarding the deadly school shooting in Uvalde.

“We’re going to find out. With all the different agencies that are involved, we’re working every angle that’s available. We won’t stop until we get all the answers that we possibly can,” he said during a news conference.

Escalon also said the investigation is focusing on the shooter’s motive as well.

Recreating the crime scene “takes days — that takes hours, that takes time, a lot of information,” he said.

He said his department “cannot do it alone,” thanking Texas Rangers, state, federal and local authorities.

“Thank you for being here and being patient with us,” he said.

NOW: Local authorities provide an update on Texas elementary school shooting

Law enforcement in Uvalde, Texas, are holding a briefing to share updates on the Tuesday mass shooting at Robb Elementary School that killed 19 children and two adults.

Musicians cancel performances at upcoming NRA convention in wake of Uvalde school massacre

Don McLean performs on May 12 in Nashville, Tennessee.

At least three musicians who were set to sing in a concert at this weekend’s annual convention of the National Rifle Association in Houston have canceled their performances after Tuesday’s mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde.

“In light of the recent events in Texas, I have decided it would be disrespectful and hurtful for me to perform for the NRA at their convention in Houston this week. I’m sure all the folks planning to attend this event are shocked and sickened by these events as well. After all, we are all Americans,” said Don McLean in a statement to CNN. “I share the sorrow for this terrible, cruel loss with the rest of the nation.” McLean is best known for the 1970s hits “American Pie” and “Vincent.”

Larry Gatlin of the Gatlin Brothers fame is also canceling, telling CNN in part, “I cannot, in good conscience, perform at the NRA convention in Houston this weekend.”

“While I agree with most of the positions held by the NRA, I have come to believe that, while background checks would not stop every madman with a gun, it is at the very least a step in the right direction toward trying to prevent the kind of tragedy we saw this week in Uvalde— in my beloved, weeping TEXAS,” Gatlin said in a statement, adding, “I’m a 2nd Amendment guy, but the 2nd Amendment should not apply to everyone. It’s that simple.”

Larry Stewart, who contributed lead vocals in the band Restless Heart, has also opted to cancel, saying, “I want to honor the victims, families, the town and our friends in the great state of Texas the best I know how.”  

CNN has reached out to other musicians slated to perform, including Danielle Peck, T. Graham Brown, Jacob Bryant, and Lee Greenwood, known for the Fourth of July favorite “God Bless the U.S.A.”

Conditions of hospitalized victims in school shooting remain unchanged, hospital officials say 

The conditions of the six hospitalized victims of Tuesday’s shooting at Robb Elementary School have remained the same, according to hospital officials. 

A 10-year-old girl and a 66-year-old woman — whom police have identified to CNN as the grandmother of the gunman — remain in serious condition, according to a tweet from University Health in San Antonio.

Two other victims, 10-year-old and 9-year-old girls, were both listed in good condition as of Thursday morning.

Robert Whetstone, a spokesperson for Brooke Army Medical Center, told CNN that the two adult patients in their care are both listed in serious condition. 

Exclusive: McConnell has directed Cornyn to engage with Democrats for a "bipartisan solution" on gun violence

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and GOP Texas Sen. John Cornyn.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told CNN he met this morning with GOP Texas Sen. John Cornyn after Cornyn returned from Texas, and encouraged the senator to begin discussions with Democrats to see if they can find a middle ground on some legislation to respond to the shooting in Texas.

The Democrats include Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona

McConnell would not say specifically what the contours of that legislation should be, instead signaling he wants Cornyn to be the one to negotiate.

“I met with Sen. Cornyn this morning. As you know, he went home yesterday to see the family members and begin the fact-finding of this awful massacre, and I have encouraged him to talk with Sen. Murphy and Sen. Sinema and others who are interested in trying to get an outcome that is directly related to the problem. I am hopeful that we could come up with a bipartisan solution,” McConnell said.

Earlier Thursday, Senate Republicans blocked a bill designed to combat domestic terrorism from advancing in a key vote. The vote comes as lawmakers are under intense pressure to take action in the wake of multiple recent episodes of horrific gun violence.

The bill passed the Democratic-controlled House last week following a tragic mass shooting at a supermarket in a predominately Black neighborhood in Buffalo, New York. But Republicans have pushed back against the measure put forward by Democrats, describing it as partisan and unnecessary.

Read more here.

The bodies of 19 school shooting victims have been released to funeral homes, officials say 

An additional 10 bodies of school shooting victims were released to funeral homes on Thursday, bringing the total number to 19, according to Judge Lalo Diaz, Uvalde County justice of the peace. 

Nine victims were released on Wednesday evening, CNN previously reported. 

Diaz told CNN that the bodies of the remaining two victims will be released later this afternoon. 

Uvalde school district had detailed security plan in place at time of elementary school massacre

The Uvalde school district where 19 children and two teachers were killed by a gunman this week had a safety plan that included its own police force, social media monitoring and a threat reporting system to “provide a safe and secure environment” for students. 

The two-page document on the Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District website lists 21 different measures that it says it has undertaken for the safety of the school community, ranging from an app for reporting bullying to physical security measures, like fencing and a buzz-in door system. It’s not clear to what degree the plan was developed with active shooters in mind.

Texas Department of Public Safety spokesperson Chris Olivarez on Thursday said the gunman, identified as Salvador Ramos, gained access to the school through an unlocked door.

Records show the district spent about $200,000 on security and monitoring services in 2017-18 and that figure rose to more than $450,000 in the 2019-20 school year.

The district employed four police officers, including a chief, detective, and two officers. The school district also had additional security staff “who patrol door entrances, parking lots and perimeters of the campuses.”

The plan included a “threat reporting system” for “students, parents, staff, and community members” to share information that is deemed “troubling,” which could include information about weapons, threats, fights, drugs, self- harm, suicide or disclosures made that are concerning.” The policy states reports could be made through the district site or to a district staff member.

The district also employed a company called Social Sentinel to monitor social media “with a connection to Uvalde as a measure to identify any possible threats that might be made against students and or staff within the school district.” 

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said the gunman wrote about his intentions on Facebook, including “I’m going to shoot an elementary school.” A spokesperson for Meta, Facebook’s parent company, said the gunman’s private one-to-one messages were discovered after the shooting.

Ramos allegedly sent similarly chilling text messages to a girl he met online describing how he had just shot his grandmother and was going to shoot up an elementary school. 

The security plan also refers to lockdown drills. “Students receive training on the Standard Response Protocol for lockout, lockdown, evacuate, shelter, and hold. In addition, drills are held for each of these emergency actions on a regular basis,” the plan said.

Two other schools, Uvalde High School and Anthon Elementary, have security vestibules, though it is not clear if Robb had one. The plan lists security cameras at the high school and middle schools, though it’s not clear how many are at the grade school where the shooting happened. “Key staff” were also equipped with radios, but it’s not clear if those were for use within the building or meant to communicate across the district.

The document is undated, but has “19-20” in the file name, possibly a reference to the 2019-2020 school year. 

The Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District has not responded to multiple CNN requests for comment.

In wake of Texas school shooting, domestic terrorism prevention bill blocked by Senate Republicans

Senate Republicans on Thursday blocked a bill designed to combat domestic terrorism from advancing in a key vote. The vote comes as lawmakers are under intense pressure to take action in the wake of multiple recent episodes of horrific gun violence, including the shooting in Uvalde.

Republicans have pushed back against the bill put forward by Democrats, describing it as partisan and unnecessary.

The final tally of the vote was 47-47. 

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer changed his vote from an “aye” to a “no” at the end in a procedural move to be able to bring the bill back up again in the future if he wants. 

At least 10 Senate Republicans would have needed to vote with Democrats to overcome the 60-vote threshold imposed by the filibuster — and that was not expected to happen.

The bill passed the House last week following a tragic mass shooting at a supermarket in a predominately Black neighborhood in Buffalo, New York.

Read more about the vote and bill here:

US Capitol 0807

Senate Republicans block domestic terrorism prevention bill in key vote

Video shows crying and screaming parents being held back from entering school by law enforcement

Several social media videos shot outside Robb Elementary on Tuesday show frantic parents rushing to the school and pleading with officers to go inside to stop the gunman or let them go in themselves as the situation was still unfolding.

The video shows law enforcement officers holding parents back – behind the yellow tape of a police line — from entering the school, as crying and screaming can be heard in the background. 

“They’re shooting in there!” someone is heard saying, “and these motherf**kers are out here worried about us.”
“We have guys going in there to get kids,” an officer told the crowd. “They’re working, they’re working,” he said.  

During an interview with CNN on Thursday morning, Texas Department of Public Safety spokesperson Chris Olivarez described Tuesday’s school shooting as “volatile,” and explained why parents who wanted to go in to help rescue students were held back. 

“I can tell you right now as a father myself, I wanted to go in too. It’s a volatile situation,” Olivarez said. 

Olivarez told CNN that with an active shooter situation, officials want to prevent any further loss of life and cannot have people go into the school.

A father of a student at Robb Elementary told The Washington Post that he and at least four other men who had children in the school were huddled near the building’s front door when they started hearing gunfire coming from the building. 

“There were five or six of us fathers, hearing the gunshots, and police officers were telling us to move back,” Javier Cazares told the Post. “We were saying, ‘let’s go,’ because that is how worried we were and wanted to get our babies out.”

Later, Cazares would learn that his 9-year-old daughter, Jacklyn, was one of the victims, reported CNN affiliate KSAT.  

Schumer says Senate will vote on gun safety legislation if talks fail to find bipartisan compromise 

In the wake of the Texas shooting, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called for the Senate to take up the House-passed domestic terrorism prevention bill in a procedural vote set for later this morning, but acknowledged that it is unlikely to advance amid GOP opposition.

Schumer said that he is willing to give some time and space for efforts to reach some kind of bipartisan compromise on gun legislation – though he conceded that the odds are long.

He made clear that these efforts will not be given an unlimited amount of time to play out, and said that if they fail, then the Senate will move forward with votes on gun safety legislation. If that happens, those votes would be expected to fail again due to Republican opposition, but would give Democrats a chance to put lawmakers on record and criticize the GOP over gun control.

“This is not an invite to negotiate indefinitely. Make no mistake, if these negotiations do not bear fruit in a short period of time, the Senate will vote on gun safety legislation,” he said.

On the domestic terrorism bill, Schumer said, “today the Senate will have a chance to act on a pernicious issue that has recently become an increasingly prevalent component in America’s gun violence epidemic – the evil spread of white supremacy and domestic terrorism.”

Schumer said if the domestic terrorism prevention bill moves forward, there could be a debate on broader gun safety-related amendments.

“There is an additional benefit to moving forward today – it’s a chance to have a larger debate and consider amendments for gun safety legislation in general, not just for those motivated by racism as vital as it is to do that. I know that many members on the other side hold views that are different than the views on this side of the aisle so let us move on this bill, let us proceed, and then they can bring them to the floor,” he said.

But he acknowledged that Republicans are expected to block the bill from advancing.

Schumer outlined what he is willing to allow in terms of bipartisan efforts to reach a compromise on gun control – and what will happen if they fail.

“If Republicans obstruct debate today, we are prepared to have an honest and realistic discussion, conversation, negotiation for a little more time to see what they can come to the table with,” he said. “We are under no illusions that this will be easy. We have been burned in the past when Republicans promised to debate only for them to break their promise. But even with long odds, the issue is so important, so raw to the American people, so personal to countless families with missing children, that we must pursue that opportunity.”

Schumer said Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy “has asked for space to see what progress can be done with Senate Republicans. Neither he nor I is under an illusion that this will be easy; it will not. But his view, my view and the overwhelming view of our caucus is we need to give it a short amount of time to try.”