Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died

By Fernando Alfonso III, Veronica Rocha, Meg Wagner, Melissa Macaya and Rob Picheta, CNN

Updated 8:10 a.m. ET, September 20, 2020
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8:34 p.m. ET, September 18, 2020

Trump, who's hosting a rally, does not appear to know Ginsburg has died

From CNN's Allie Malloy and Jim Acosta 

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Bemidji Regional Airport on September 18 in Bemidji, Minnesota.
President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Bemidji Regional Airport on September 18 in Bemidji, Minnesota. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

President Trump took the stage in Bemidji, Minnesota, minutes before the news broke that Ruth Bader Ginsburg died, and he has not acknowledged the late Supreme Court justice, appearing not to know the news as he continues his rally. 

The White House referred reporters to comments the President made in August during a radio interview with Hugh Hewitt about a replacement on the high court, when he said he would absolutely seek to fill a seat that opened suddenly. "I would move quickly. Why not? I mean they would. The Democrats would if they were in this position." 

As Trump continued his rally, attendees muttered the news to each other with one supporter telling the other: "Did you see the news about RBG? I don't think he knows." 

At one moment someone in the back of the rally shouted "RBG just died" but Trump did not seem to hear. 

8:22 p.m. ET, September 18, 2020

Nancy Pelosi orders US Capitol flags to be flown at half-staff in honor of Ginsburg

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has ordered the flags at the US Capitol to be flown at half-staff in honor of the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, according to a tweet from one of her staff members.

“Speaker Pelosi has ordered the flags at the U.S. Capitol to be flown at half-staff due to the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg," Drew Hammill, her deputy chief of staff, tweeted.

Read the message:

8:21 p.m. ET, September 18, 2020

New York leaders mourn Ginsburg, "a daughter of Brooklyn"

New York leaders are morning the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who was born in Brooklyn in 1933.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said he was "crushed" by the loss, tweeting that Ginsburg was a "daughter of Brooklyn" and a "tenacious spirit who moved this country forward in fairness, equality and morality." 

Meanwhile, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the state's "heart breaks" with her death.

"During her extraordinary career, this Brooklyn native broke barriers & the letters RBG took on new meaning—as battle cry & inspiration," Cuomo wrote.

8:46 p.m. ET, September 18, 2020

Hillary Clinton says Ginsburg "paved the way for so many women"

Ginsburg visits with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton at the State Department in Washington in 2012.
Ginsburg visits with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton at the State Department in Washington in 2012. AP

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton paid her respects to the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Twitter this evening, where she said "there will never be another like her."

"Justice Ginsburg paved the way for so many women, including me. There will never be another like her. Thank you RBG," Clinton tweeted.

Read the message:

8:21 p.m. ET, September 18, 2020

George W. Bush says Ginsburg "inspired more than one generation of women and girls"

From CNN's Kevin Bohn

Former President George W. Bush said Ruth Bader Ginsburg "dedicated many of her 87 remarkable years to the pursuit of justice and equality," according to a statement he released along with his wife, Laura, shortly after the Supreme Court justice's death was announced this evening.

Here's the statement:

"Laura and I join our fellow Americans in mourning the loss of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She dedicated many of her 87 remarkable years to the pursuit of justice and equality, and she inspired more than one generation of women and girls. Justice Ginsburg loved our country and the law. Laura and I are fortunate to have known this smart and humorous trailblazer, and we send our condolences to the Ginsburg family," Bush said.
8:11 p.m. ET, September 18, 2020

Ginsburg was working on a book at the time of her death

From CNN's Ariane De Vogue

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — even after her fifth diagnosis with cancer — was writing a book with one of her former clerks, Amanda Tyler.

It was based on her life on gender equality. 

8:10 p.m. ET, September 18, 2020

Senate Democratic leader: Ginsburg "would want us all to fight as hard as we can to preserve her legacy"

From CNN's Nicky Robertson

Following the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer called her a "giant in American history" and a "trailblazer for women."

Schumer went on to tweet a warning to Senate colleagues about rushing to confirm a new Supreme Court justice, writing that, "The American people should have a voice in the selection of their next Supreme Court Justice. Therefore, this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new president."

8:16 p.m. ET, September 18, 2020

Co-author of "Notorious RBG" says it was "an honor" to make Ginsburg laugh

Irin Carmon, the co-author of "Notorious RBG," discussed her relationship with the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg who, in 2017, had officiated her wedding.

"[S]he sent me a note and a T-shirt making her an honorary grand clerk, although I did not have the honor of working for Justice Ginsburg. She's somebody that drew people in even in her own reserved way, she's somebody that made you feel like you were part of her caring circle. In terms of her sense of humor, it was very subtle. It was an honor to make her laugh," Carmon said on CNN.

Watch:

8:23 p.m. ET, September 18, 2020

Here's how the Supreme Court announced Ginsburg's death

The Supreme Court of the United States this evening announced that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died.

Here's how the statement from the court began:

"Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died this evening surrounded by her family at her home in Washington, D.C., due to complications of metastatic pancreas cancer. She was 87 years old. Justice Ginsburg was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Clinton in 1993. She was the second woman appointed to the Court and served more than 27 years. She is survived by her two children: Jane Carol Ginsburg (George Spera) and James Steven Ginsburg (Patrice Michaels), four grandchildren: Paul Spera (Francesca Toich), Clara Spera (Rory Boyd), Miranda Ginsburg, Abigail Ginsburg, two step-grandchildren: Harjinder Bedi, Satinder Bedi, and one great- grandchild: Lucrezia Spera. Her husband, Martin David Ginsburg, died in 2010."

The court's statement also included a quote from Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr.:

"Our Nation has lost a jurist of historic stature. We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her -- a tireless and resolute champion of justice," Roberts said.

You can read the full statement from the Supreme Court here.