Kyle Rittenhouse trial

By Mike Hayes, Meg Wagner and Melissa Macaya, CNN

Updated 7:10 PM ET, Mon November 8, 2021
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6:10 p.m. ET, November 8, 2021

Kyle Rittenhouse is on trial for homicide charges. Here's what happened in court today.

From CNN's Elise Hammond

Kyle Rittenhouse looks back before his trial starts on Monday at the Kenosha County Courthouse in Kenosha, Wisconsin.
Kyle Rittenhouse looks back before his trial starts on Monday at the Kenosha County Courthouse in Kenosha, Wisconsin. (Sean Krajacic/The Kenosha News/Pool/AP)

Kyle Rittenhouse, the armed Illinois teenager who killed two people and wounded another during unrest in Kenosha, Wisconsin, last summer, is on trial.

Rittenhouse is charged with five felonies, a misdemeanor charge and a non-criminal violation. He has pleaded not guilty.

Prosecutors say Rittenhouse's actions constituted criminal homicide, but his attorneys say he shot the men in self-defense. Wisconsin law requires when a self-defense claim is raised, prosecutors must disprove self-defense beyond a reasonable doubt – a difficult obstacle for the state.

Attorneys questioned several witnesses, including experts on guns, the detective who made the arrest, and the only person to survive being shot by Rittenhouse.

Here are some of the biggest takeaways from the courtroom today:

Gaige Grosskreutz:

  • He is the only one of the three men shot by Kyle Rittenhouse during a night of protests in Kenosha last year who survived.
  • According to the criminal complaint, Rittenhouse shot and injured Grosskreutz, who approached him shortly after Anthony Huber was shot. The complaint said Grosskreutz put his hands in the air and then began to move toward Rittenhouse, who then fired one shot, hitting Grosskreutz in the arm.
  • Photos and videos presented in court show that Grosskreutz had a gun in his hand as he was standing a few feet from Rittenhouse. During that line of questioning, Grosskreutz agreed with the defense that his firearm was pointed at Rittenhouse. Later during redirect questioning by the prosecution, he said he never intentionally pointed his gun at Rittenhouse during the shooting.
  • When questioned by the defense attorney Grosskreutz agreed that "It wasn't until you pointed your gun at [Rittenhouse]...that he fired."

Jason Krueger:

  • The Kenosha police officer testified that he and his partner were responding to another call for a fire in the area of the protests when they heard gunshots.
  • Krueger said Kyle Rittenhouse approached his squad car carrying an AR-15 rifle with his hands in the air. Krueger testified that he commanded Rittenhouse to "keep away" and "stay back" from the car, but he kept walking toward the police. Krueger deployed his pepper spray.
  • He testified that when Rittenhouse was approaching the car he said "something about a shooting" but gave "no verbal indication" that he was the person who shot his gun.

What's next: The trial is expected to last just over two weeks and will be televised, Kenosha County Circuit Judge Bruce Schroeder said in court.

Once the prosecution rests their case, the defense will have their turn to call witnesses.

5:03 p.m. ET, November 8, 2021

Lead detective says Rittenhouse admitted he was involved in the shootings within hours

From CNN's Mike Hayes

(CNN)
(CNN)

Kenosha police detective Ben Antaramian said that on the night of Aug. 25, 2020, he was assigned to visit local gas stations and make sure their pumps were shut off to prevent fires from being set.

After the shootings occurred, Det. Antaramian's assignment changed — he was made one of the lead investigators into the shootings of Joseph Rosenbaum, Anthony Huber and Gaige Grosskreutz.

He said he learned that Kyle Rittenhouse was the suspected gunman "within a few hours" of the shootings that night.

During cross-examination, Antaramian told defense attorney Corey Chirafisi he also saw two videos circulating on social media that night that showed the shootings.

Antaramian said that Rittenhouse was placed under arrest at around 6 a.m. the next morning. Prior to that, Rittenhouse admitted that he had been involved in the shootings, the detective said.

4:11 p.m. ET, November 8, 2021

Police officer says Rittenhouse approached his squad car, but did not say he shot anyone

From CNN's Mike Hayes

(CNN)
(CNN)

Kenosha police officer Jason Krueger testified that he and his partner were responding to another call for a fire in the area of the protests when they heard gunshots.

Krueger said that as they got closer to the vicinity of the gunshots, Kyle Rittenhouse approached his squad car carrying an AR-15 rifle with his hands in the air. Krueger testified that he commanded Rittenhouse to "keep away" and "stay back" from the car, but he kept walking toward the police. Krueger deployed his pepper spray at Rittenhouse, who then walked away.

Krueger testified that he did not believe that Rittenhouse was surrendering.

Krueger testified that he then learned that there was a person who suffered a gunshot wound to the arm. He helped get the victim, who he later learned to be Gaige Grosskreutz, to the ER.

On cross-examination, Krueger was asked what Rittenhouse said to him when he approached his police car. The police officer testified that Rittenhouse said "something about a shooting" but gave "no verbal indication" that he was the person who shot his gun.

2:52 p.m. ET, November 8, 2021

Shooting victim clarifies he never intentionally pointed his gun at Rittenhouse

From CNN's Mike Hayes

(CNN)
(CNN)

Shooting victim Gaige Grosskreutz clarified during redirect questioning by the prosecution that he never intentionally pointed his gun at Kyle Rittenhouse during the shooting.

Kenosha, Wisconsin assistant DA Thomas Binger asked Grosskreutz if at any point during the encounter with Rittenhouse did he intentionally point his firearm at the defendant. He responded, "No, I did not."

Asked if he felt there was "imminent danger" that the defendant was going to kill him, he said yes.

Some context: During cross-examination, Grosskreutz acknowledged that his handgun was in his right hand and pointed towards Rittenhouse before he was shot.

1:24 p.m. ET, November 8, 2021

Shooting victim acknowledges that he pointed his gun at Rittenhouse

From CNN's Mike Hayes

(CNN)
(CNN)

Gaige Grosskreutz, the lone surviving victim who was shot by Kyle Rittenhouse, acknowledged during cross-examination that he was pointing his gun at Rittenhouse when he was shot in the arm.

During the cross-examination, Rittenhouse's defense attorney showed the witness portions of video and still images captured that night.

In the footage, Grosskreutz can be seen about 3 to 5 feet from Rittenhouse as he shoots Anthony Huber, who died.

During testimony, when asked if he was "advancing" on Rittenhouse while the defendant was "seated on his butt" on the ground after shooting Huber, Grosskreutz said yes.

The defense then showed an image of Grosskreutz with his gun in his right hand standing a few feet from Rittenhouse. Grosskreutz agreed with the defense that his firearm was pointed at Rittenhouse.

Grosskreutz said that the image, which captured the moment he was shot, shows his "bicep being vaporized." Rittenhouse's defense attorney asked him if when his bicep is "being vaporized" if his gun was pointed at the defendant. Grosskreutz said yes.

"It wasn't until you pointed your gun at [Rittenhouse]...that he fired," the attorney asked.

"Correct," Grosskreutz said.

Grosskreutz also said he did not have any regrets about the way that night unfolded.

"You have some regrets from that evening, don't you?" the attorney asked.

"No," Grosskreutz replied.

1:02 p.m. ET, November 8, 2021

Shooting victim denies that he was chasing Rittenhouse with his gun during cross-examination

From CNN's Mike Hayes

(CNN)
(CNN)

A defense attorney for Kyle Rittenhouse asked shooting victim Gaige Grosskreutz during cross-examination if he "pulled a firearm from his belt" and "chased" the defendant prior to being shot.

Grosskreutz responded, "that is not true."

The defense showed a still image from a video of Grosskreutz running with his hand reaching into the back of his pants at his waist where his gun was concealed. Grosskreutz acknowledged that at that point, Rittenhouse was about 30 feet ahead of him.

Asked again if he agreed that he was chasing Rittenhouse, the witness said no.

Grosskreutz acknowledged that he heard others who were running say "get his ass" and "get him" in reference to Rittenhouse.

Grosskreutz said that he was concerned for Rittenhouse's safety.

12:30 p.m. ET, November 8, 2021

Shooting victim says he has "no sensation" in lower part of arm that was shot by Rittenhouse

From CNN's Mike Hayes

Prosecutors closed out their direct questioning of shooting victim Gaige Grosskreutz by asking him about any physical issues with his arm that persist since the incident.

He said that along with having issues lifting "larger heavier things" he has a "neurological deficit" in his arm.

Grosskreutz said that while he is "able to move" his right arm, his upper forearm down to his right thumb he has "no sensation."

Grosskreutz is now being cross-examined by the defense.

12:23 p.m. ET, November 8, 2021

Shooting victim says he spent a week in hospital and underwent multiple surgeries for gunshot wound to arm

From CNN's Mike Hayes

Gaige Grosskreutz said that he had multiple tourniquets applied to his right arm at the scene to attempt to stop the bleeding after being shot.

Earlier Monday, he testified that most of his right bicep was shot off by Kyle Rittenhouse. Graphic images were shown in court of Grosskreutz's arm on Monday morning.

From the shooting, Grosskreutz said he was taken to the emergency room. The hospital determined he needed to be taken by ambulance to another hospital. From there he was transported by flight to Milwaukee for surgery.

Grosskreutz testified that he had at least two more surgeries to clean off the tissue in the early morning hours of the day after the incident. He said that a few days later, he underwent more surgery to attempt to repair his arm.

Overall, Grosskreutz said he spent a week in the hospital for emergency care and several months in physical therapy for his injury.

11:42 a.m. ET, November 8, 2021

Video played in court shows Rittenhouse shooting multiple people in the street

From CNN's Mike Hayes

Shooting victim Gaige Grosskreutz testified he thought he was going to die after observing Kyle Rittenhouse shoot somebody else.

Grosskreutz testified that he saw Rittenhouse shoot Anthony Huber, who later died. After he saw Huber get shot, he said he "was very close to the defendant" and believed there was a "high likelihood that he would be shot himself."

Video played in court showed Rittenhouse shooting Huber. The video then showed Rittenhouse with his AR-15 gun raised and pointed at Grosskreutz, whose hands were in the air. In one hand, Grosskreutz was holding his handgun. At that point, Grosskreutz said, he observed Rittenhouse "re-rack his weapon," readying it to fire.

He said that he felt he had to do something to prevent himself from "being killed." However, he testified he did not fire his gun.

Video shows that Rittenhouse then shot Grosskreutz in the arm.

"I was hit in my right bicep," he said, adding, "I affectively lost a large majority of my right bicep."