The latest on Kenosha police shooting of Jacob Blake

By Melissa Macaya, Meg Wagner and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 8:44 p.m. ET, August 31, 2020
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4:42 p.m. ET, August 31, 2020

Kenosha curfew will last for rest of the week, mayor says

From CNN's Konstantin Toropin

National Guard troops patrol a street  in Kenosha, Wisconsin on August 27.
National Guard troops patrol a street in Kenosha, Wisconsin on August 27. Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Kenosha Mayor John Antaramian said that the city's curfew will continue for the rest of the week.

"The curfew will be continued through Tuesday night and then on Wednesday, it'll be extended to 9 o'clock," Antaramian said. 

The curfew currently begins at 7:00 p.m. local time or 8:00 p.m. ET.

4:35 p.m. ET, August 31, 2020

Wisconsin officials call Trump visit ill-timed

From CNN's Konstantin Toropin

Kenosha Mayor John Antaramian speaks at a press conference on August 31. 
Kenosha Mayor John Antaramian speaks at a press conference on August 31.  CNN

Officials in Kenosha, Wisconsin, noted that President Trump's visit to the city is ill-timed and said the visit would utilize limited resources. 

Kenosha Mayor John Antaramian reiterated that he felt "the timing is wrong."

"You have a community that is in the process of trying to heal," the mayor added.

Jim Kreuser, the Kenosha County Executive, also echoed that sentiment.

"There's a lot of crisis going on in our community and there's limited resources," Kreuser said.

Kenosha County Sheriff David Beth noted that a visit by any major figure will create extra work for the department. 

Beth said that it wasn't his place to comment on the visit and instead simply noted, "I know that he is coming and that we will do our best to protect him."

Kreuser strongly pushed back on President Trump's tweeted assertion that “there would be no Kenosha” if he hadn’t insisted on activating the National Guard.

"Kenosha is going to be on the comeback and for someone to say we wouldn't exist but for their action, [...] because I know things too, I just have to tell you what I believe the answer is and that's false," Kreuser said.

Neither the County Executive nor the mayor said they were aware of the plans for Trump's visit or if they were meeting with him.

3:15 p.m. ET, August 31, 2020

Kenosha County Sheriff will get body cameras

From CNN’s Konstantin Toropin

Jim Kreuser, the Kenosha County Executive, announced that he is adding body cameras for law enforcement to the upcoming budget at a press conference this afternoon. 

“I've also heard the call for transparency and I can tell you that body cameras for the Kenosha County Sheriff's Department will be in the budget that I will present October 6 for implementation in 2021,” Kreuser said.

Remember: Jacob Blake was shot and critically injured last week by an officer with the Kenosha Police Department, not the Sheriff's Department.

Last week, Kenosha Mayor John Antaramian said the Kenosha Police Department does not have body cameras. 

4:32 p.m. ET, August 31, 2020

Trump weighs in on Biden speech: "he’s blaming the Police far more than he’s blaming the Rioters"

From CNN's Nikki Carvajal

President Donald Trump speaks with reporters aboard Air Force One on August 28.
President Donald Trump speaks with reporters aboard Air Force One on August 28. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump said he watched Joe Biden’s speech Monday afternoon and accused the former vice president of “blaming the police” for protests and violence across the country.

“Just watched what Biden had to say,” Trump wrote on twitter. “To me, he’s blaming the Police far more than he’s blaming the Rioters, Anarchists, Agitators, and Looters, which he could never blame or he would lose the Radical Left Bernie supports!”

CNN’s Sarah Mucha reports the Democratic presidential nominee delivered a blistering condemnation of Trump in his remarks in Pittsburgh on Monday afternoon, calling him a "toxic presence" in our nation.

"Donald Trump has been a toxic presence in our nation for four years," Biden said. "Poisoning how we talk to one another. Poisoning how we treat one another. Poisoning the values this nation has always held dear. Poisoning to our democracy."

Taking the President and Republicans to task on the talking point that Americans will be unsafe in Biden’s America and painting him as a “radical leftist,” Biden once again pointed to the fact that Trump is currently the President.

He attempted to portray Trump as a leader who puts Americans' safety at risk. Monday’s speech stands in stark contrast to his Democratic National Convention remarks, where he did not mention the President by name once. 

4:22 p.m. ET, August 31, 2020

Biden calls Trump a "toxic presence in our nation"

From CNN's Sarah Mucha

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks at a campaign event at Mill 19 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on August 31.
Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks at a campaign event at Mill 19 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on August 31. Carolyn Kaster/AP

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden delivered a blistering condemnation of President Trump in his remarks in Pittsburg this afternoon, calling him a "toxic presence in our nation."

"Donald Trump has been a toxic presence in our nation for four years," he said. "Poisoning how we talk to one another. Poisoning how we treat one another. Poisoning the values this nation has always held dear. Poisoning to our democracy."

"Will we rid ourselves of this toxin or will we make it a permanent part of our nation’s character?" Biden asked.

4:24 p.m. ET, August 31, 2020

White House press secretary won't condemn armed vigilantes 

From CNN's Nikki Carvajal 

White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany speaks during a briefing on August 31 in Washington, DC.
White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany speaks during a briefing on August 31 in Washington, DC. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany refused to denounce armed vigilantes taking to the streets during a press briefing Monday. 

Asked if the White House believes that citizens should stop showing up in cities, especially ones they don’t live in, with weapons to protect buildings, McEnany didn’t directly answer. 

“This White House believes our police should be fully funded,” she responded. “We should have more police rather than less, we shouldn’t criticize our police because it is our police officers who are responsible for taking to the streets and protecting us.”

“We need to fund our police officers because they should be the ones out patrolling the streets,” McEnany added.

4:31 p.m. ET, August 31, 2020

Biden: "Do I look to you like a radical socialist with a soft spot for rioters?"

From CNN's Sarah Mucha

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks at campaign event on August, 31 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks at campaign event on August, 31 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Carolyn Kaster

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden took the Trump campaign's talking points that paint him as a "radical leftist" to task in his remarks in Pittsburgh Monday afternoon, saying "The road back begins now, in this campaign. You know me. You know my heart, and you know my story, my family’s story. Ask yourself: Do I look to you like a radical socialist with a soft spot for rioters?" 

"He’s supposed to be protecting this country but instead he is rooting for chaos and violence," Biden said of President Trump. 

"'You won’t be safe in Joe Biden’s America.'" Biden quoted. "And what’s their proof? The violence you’re seeing in Donald Trump’s America. These are not images from some imagined 'Joe Biden’s America' in the future. These are images from Donald Trump’s America today." 

He said he believes that if he were president currently, the country would be safer "and we'd be seeing a lot less violence."

2:54 p.m. ET, August 31, 2020

Biden: "Trump failed to protect America, so now he is trying to scare America"

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden decried the leadership of President Trump during the civil unrest in Kenosha, Wisconsin. He blamed Trump for trying to "scare America" instead of protecting the country.

"This is a sitting president of the United States of America. He's supposed to be protecting this country. But instead he's rooting for chaos and violence. The simple truth is Donald Trump failed to protect America," Biden said in remarks delivered from Pittsburgh. "So now he is trying to scare America."

Biden also accused the President of not being able to stop the violence because for years "he's fomented it."

"Fires are burning, and we have a President who fans the flames rather than fighting the flames. But it must not burn. We have to build. This President long ago forfeited any moral leadership in this country. He can't stop the violence because for years he's fomented it," he said.

"It isn't about my brand. It is about you, the American people. We can do better. And we have to do better. I promise you this. We will do better. You know, the road back begins now," Biden said.

Watch:

2:24 p.m. ET, August 31, 2020

Biden condemns looting and violence: "None of this is protesting"

From CNN's Sarah Mucha

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden began his remarks in Pittsburgh by declaring that President Trump "is incapable of telling us the truth, incapable of facing the facts. Incapable of healing."

He went on to condemn violent protestors.

"I want to make it absolutely clear, I'll be very clear about all this: rioting is not protesting. Looting is not protesting. Setting fires is not protesting. None of this is protesting. It’s lawlessness, plain and simple.”  

Biden said those who do it "should be prosecuted, plain and simple" and added that violence does not bring change.

Watch: