Isaias lashes the US East Coast

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1:05 p.m. ET, August 4, 2020

At least two people dead in North Carolina as Isaias makes landfall

From CNN's Tina Burnside

WRAL
WRAL

A second storm-related death has been confirmed in Bertie County, North Carolina, after a tornado touched down at a mobile home park overnight, according to a news release from the county. 

The tornado touched down just after 2 a.m. ET at the Cedar Landing mobile home community in Windsor, North Carolina, the release stated. 

Task force teams are on the ground assisting in the search and rescue efforts, the county said. 

According to CNN affiliate WCTI, three people remain unaccounted for. 

12:29 p.m. ET, August 4, 2020

More than a million customers without power from Isaias

From CNN's Dave Hennen

There are now more than a million customers without power from the strong winds and tornadoes associated with Isaias, according to PowerOutage.US.

New Jersey is currently the most impacted area with more than 325,000 customers impacted. Virginia is a close second, with nearly 300,000, followed by North Carolina, with nearly 230,000 and Maryland and Pennsylvania both over 100,000.

Strong storms, high winds and tornadoes will continue to impact the Northeast through the afternoon and into the evening, so that number will continue to grow.

11:27 a.m. ET, August 4, 2020

Hurricanes produce tornadoes — often with little warning

More tornadoes are highly likely as Isaias continues to track through the Northeast Tuesday.

Most hurricanes and tropical storms are good at producing tornadoes because they cause a lot of vertical shear — or differences in wind direction and speed at different heights.

Tornadoes caused by hurricanes "are generally smaller, weaker, and shorter-lived than traditional tornadoes you see across Tornado Alley," the wide stretch of the Midwest and southern Plains that frequently gets pummeled by twisters, says CNN meteorologist Brandon Miller.

But they can spin up very quickly and with little warning. 

It is good to be prepared and close a safe space when you are within a tornado watch. This way, when a warning is issued, you can get out of harm's way. 

Here are four tips four quick tornado safety tips that could save your life

  • Get alerts
  • Know the safest places to shelter
  • Avoid dangerous places
  • Protect yourself
11:27 a.m. ET, August 4, 2020

Here's how New York state is preparing for Isaias 

From CNN's Kristina Sgueglia,

Workers erect temporary flood barriers in the South Street Seaport neighborhood in preparation for potential flooding and a storm surge from Tropical Storm Isaias on August 3 in New York.
Workers erect temporary flood barriers in the South Street Seaport neighborhood in preparation for potential flooding and a storm surge from Tropical Storm Isaias on August 3 in New York. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued a lengthy advisory detailing steps the state is taking as Isaias gains traction on the US coast. Ahead of the storm, Covid-19 emergency operations centers have been coordinating with weather state response teams.

"Tropical Storm Isaias has started moving through New York, bringing with it strong winds, torrential rain and the potential for flash flooding that can cause major disruptions, and I'm urging New Yorkers, particularly those directly in Isaias' path, to stay calm, be smart and avoid unnecessary travel," Cuomo said

Here are some key details:

  • Resources have be pre-deployed to regions anticipated to be affected — Capital, Mid-Hudson, New York City and Long Island
  • Tropical Storm warnings and Tornado watches are in effect for the lower Mid-Hudson, New York City and Long Island Regions
  • NWS has issued a number of flash flood watches and wind advisories for areas throughout the northern Mid-Hudson, Southern Tier, Capital and North Country Regions
  •  New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services' Emergency Operations Center remains activated due to the Covid-19 pandemic and will monitor weather conditions, coordinate state response operations and stay in contact with localities throughout the duration of the event
  • The Division's Office of Fire Prevention and Control has pre-deployed its Swift Water Urban Search and Rescue teams to areas within the storm track to assist local first responders in the event support is needed- teams are equipped with boats and high-axle vehicles.
  • The state's department of transportation is prepared to respond with 3,517 supervisors and operators available statewide with thousands of pieces of equipment on hand to deploy

You can read more of the advisory here.

11:20 a.m. ET, August 4, 2020

New Jersey issues statewide tornado and flash flood watch ahead of Isaias

From CNN’s Evan Simko-Bednarski

A tarp meant to close a seaside restaurant is blown by wind Tuesday, Aug. 4, in Atlantic City, New Jersey.
A tarp meant to close a seaside restaurant is blown by wind Tuesday, Aug. 4, in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jacqueline Larma/AP

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy told reporters today that the entire state is under a flash flood watch in expectation of Tropical Storm Isaias.

Murphy said residents should expect wind gusts in excess of 40mph statewide, with winds up to 70mph possibly along the shore.

The state is also under a tornado watch, Murphy said. The governor warned that "many of hundreds of thousands of power outages" may result from the fast moving storm.

"We're hoping for the best and preparing for the worst," he said. 

Jared Maples, head of the state's Office of Homeland Security and preparedness, also warned New Jersey residents to be cautious of where they get their information.

"There is a real threat to disinformation and misinformation," he said. "The disinformation campaigns are designed to sow discontent and to take advantage of emergencies as they happen."

There is a car pulled trailer ban instituted on highways as of now, officials said.

New Jersey Transit is still operating as normal.

 

10:57 a.m. ET, August 4, 2020

Here's the latest update from the National Hurricane Center on Isaias

Tropical Storm Isaias is "moving rapidly across eastern Maryland," according to the National Hurricane Center's latest forecast advisory.

The storm is expected to bring strong winds, heavy rainfall and possible tornadoes as it continues to move northward.

Much of the Mid-Atlantic and New England coast remains under a tropical storm warning.

Here's a look at the latest forecast for Isaias:

10:56 a.m. ET, August 4, 2020

Mayor of Delaware city issues state of emergency including driving restrictions

From CNN's Ganesh Setty

The Dover, Delaware mayor has issued a State of Emergency for the city – including asking individuals to stay in their homes and avoid unnecessary travel, according to verified social media for the police department.

The police are asking individuals to be mindful of downed wires as its taken numerous calls from throughout the city. The city of Dover serves over 38,000 people according to the latest census data.

Here is the full statement from the police:

Further details to come, but as of 9:30 a.m., the Mayor has issued a State of Emergency for the City of Dover which includes driving restrictions. We are asking you to stay in your homes and avoid unnecessary travel. If your vehicle is parked on the street where trees are down, please move it if possible to help our utility and cleanup crews. PLEASE BE MINDFUL OF DOWNED WIRES!!! We have taken numerous calls from throughout the city. Further details on the State Of Emergency restrictions are forthcoming
10:40 a.m. ET, August 4, 2020

New York City mayor warns residents to take the storm "very seriously"

From CNN's Melanie Schuman

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks at a press conference at the South Street Seaport about city preparations for tropical storm Isaias on Monday, August 3.
New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks at a press conference at the South Street Seaport about city preparations for tropical storm Isaias on Monday, August 3. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/Getty Images

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is warning residents to take precautions as the city prepares for heavy rain, high winds and flooding potential along with a threat of tornadoes.

The mayor said his most important message is “everyone take this very seriously.”

The storm has shifted to the west which means the strongest wind band will track right over New York City according to Office of Emergency Management Commissioner Deanne Criswell.

The city will experience sustained 45-55 mph, which is up 10 mph from predictions Monday, and there are still gusts up to 70 mph expected between noon and 5 p.m. ET today.

While a tornado watch has been issued until 4 p.m. ET, Criswell said it’s likely tornado warnings will be issued and people should seek immediate cover away from window and move to lower floors. If you are in a high rise, which are common in parts of the city, go towards the inside of a building. People should not use elevators.

“That is such a rarity here in New York City,” the mayor said Tuesday. “It is something to worry about.”

Coastal flood warnings have been issued for Staten Island, Brooklyn and southern Queens and coastal flood advisories issued for Manhattan and the Bronx.

Areas which often see tidal flooding on roads may see one to two feet of water above ground. Many of these areas are in Queens.

10:36 a.m. ET, August 4, 2020

Tornado seen on the ground near Ocean City, New Jersey

From CNN's Paul P Murphy

Eyewitness video taken by Anthony Brooks shows a tornado on the ground near Ocean City, New Jersey.

Around the time the video was taken, the National Weather Service issued a tornado warning, saying trained spotters had seen a tornado near Ocean City.

WARNING: The video below contains some profanity.