The latest on Ida's aftermath

By Melissa Mahtani and Meg Wagner, CNN

Updated 7:36 p.m. ET, September 3, 2021
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1:00 p.m. ET, September 3, 2021

Following Ida, New York City launches program to deal with rain and extreme weather

From CNN’s Mirna Alsharif

People stand at a flooded subway entrance as they debate wading through high water caused by the remnants of Hurricane Ida, in Queens, New York, on September 1.
People stand at a flooded subway entrance as they debate wading through high water caused by the remnants of Hurricane Ida, in Queens, New York, on September 1. (Anthony Behar/Sipa US/AP)

Following historic rainfall across New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio on Friday announced the NYC Climate-Driven Rain Response, a series of initiatives the city will undertake to help the city deal with extreme weather.

The initiative will focus on warning systems, protecting people living in basement-level homes and the creation of a 30-day extreme weather response task force, which will put together a new set of protocols and policies by climate week, he said.

The mayor said New Yorkers didn’t know they’d experience “shocking and unprecedented rainfall.” 

"We had a one-hour period Wednesday night that set the all-time record for a single hour in the history, the recorded history of New York City … We had set a previous record a few weeks earlier for the most rainfall in an hour, (but) this new record is much, much higher," he said. 

"We have to change what we do across the board, we need to change our entire mindset because we're being dealt a very different hand of cards now," he added.

The system of warnings will include...

  • Travel bans
  • Evacuations
  • Requiring people to clear the streets.

This system can include first responders going door-to-door and getting people out of their homes, de Blasio said. 

People living in basement apartments may expect to receive specific cell phone alerts ahead of storms about the vulnerabilities they face and to be evacuated from their homes, he added.

De Blasio did not say how soon these changes will be implemented.

"We're going to, in particular, focus on a different kind of warning, a much more severe kind of warning and a much more severe set of actions," said de Blasio. "We now understand that this kind of radical, sudden change in weather is beyond the understanding, beyond the reach of any of our typical measuring tools. Things are happening that projections can't track with accuracy or consistency, which means we have to assume the worst in a way we never have before."

 

11:53 a.m. ET, September 3, 2021

Ohio will deploy National Guard soldiers to Louisiana

From CNN’s Amanda Watts

Members of the Ohio National Guard arrive ahead of protests at the Ohio Statehouse on Wednesday, January 20, in Columbus, Ohio.
Members of the Ohio National Guard arrive ahead of protests at the Ohio Statehouse on Wednesday, January 20, in Columbus, Ohio. (Jason Whitman/NurPhoto/Getty Images)

Ohio will deploy 250 National Guard soldiers to Louisiana to help the region hit by Hurricane Ida, according to a statement from the governor’s office. 

The statement from the office of Gov. Mike DeWine said the soldiers were requested by Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards.   

The soldiers will be placed on active duty on Sept. 8 and will be deployed for roughly three weeks. While there, soldiers “will be providing general-purpose support during the relief mission,” the statement added.

A majority of the National Guard will be activated from the 112th Transportation Battalion (North Canton), the 1485th Transportation Company (Coshocton), and the 1486th Transportation Company (Mansfield), the statement said. 

Ohio joins several other states, including North Carolina and Missouri, that have sent National Guard troops to help the region ravaged by the Category 4 storm. 

 

11:42 a.m. ET, September 3, 2021

Biden is heading to Louisiana today. Here's what's on his schedule.

President Joe Biden speaks from the White House on September 3.
President Joe Biden speaks from the White House on September 3. (Susan Walsh/AP)

President Biden is traveling to Louisiana today, five days after Hurricane Ida made landfall in the state. He's scheduled to arrive in New Orleans just after 1 p.m. ET.

The President will first travel to St. John Parish's Emergency Operations Center in LaPlace, Louisiana, for a briefing with local leaders at 2:15 p.m. ET, according to the White House schedule. After that, he'll tour a neighborhood in LaPlace and speak about his administration’s response to the hurricane.

Around 5 p.m. ET, Biden will take an aerial tour of communities damaged in Hurricane Ida, including Laffite, Grand Isle, Port Fourchon and Lafourche Parish.

He'll finish his day by meeting with local leaders in Galliano, Louisiana.

11:37 a.m. ET, September 3, 2021

New Jersey announces $10 million in grants for small businesses affected by Ida

From CNN’s Mirna Alsharif

Gov. Phil Murphy speaks in Millburn, New Jersey, on September 3.
Gov. Phil Murphy speaks in Millburn, New Jersey, on September 3. (WABC)

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy announced a $10 million dollar grant program for small businesses affected by Ida.

"If you have been crushed and you can prove it, you're eligible," Murphy said Friday, encouraging business owners to document damages with photos and receipts.

"Help is coming, I know this is the absolute thing that you all needed in the small business community, probably any of us needed, after a year and a half of long struggle against the pandemic."

The money will be made available through the New Jersey Economic Development authority and will provide anywhere from $1,000 to $5,000 per business, he said.

Additional details on the grant program will be available next week.

10:56 a.m. ET, September 3, 2021

Louisiana power company releases timeline for power restoration

From CNN’s Amanda Watts

 

A storm-damaged neighborhood in Covington, Louisiana, is pictured during sunset on August 31.
A storm-damaged neighborhood in Covington, Louisiana, is pictured during sunset on August 31. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

Cleco Power has released a restoration timeline for customers to get power back, five days after Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana. 

The company estimated that many impacted areas will have power by Friday, according to a post on Facebook. Many subdivisions in St. Tammany Parish had their power restored on Thursday, the company said.  

Cleco Power said “If you do not see your area listed, we do not have information available for the area at this time.”

Cleco released the following estimates:

Abita Springs: 

  • High water impeded crews from working in the center of town. In town should be 50% restored today.

Mandeville:

  • Chateau Village — today
  • Cedarwood Village — today
  • Beau West — today
  • Beau Rivage — today
  • Beau Chene — today
  • The commercial area on Hwy 22 East of Cedarwood Drive — today
  • Chapel Creek apartments — today
  • Penn’s Chapel Place — today
  • Section of Greenleaves off of Hwy 190 — today
  • Old Golden Shores – 80% of customers’ power today
  • Lakewood Heights – 80% of customers’ power today
  • Commercial area on Causeway Blvd and Florida Street — today

Covington: 

  • Angelic Estates subdivision and Soelle Drive – 90% of customers’ power today
  • 19th Ave and Jefferson St. area — remaining 50% of customers’ power today

Madisonville:

These subdivisions have an estimated time of return of today:

  • Southdown
  • Arbor Walk
  • Natchez Trace
  • Palm Courts
  • Madison Farms
  • Heritage Oaks
  • Faubourg Coquille
  • Myrtle Grove
  • Post Oak Landing
  • Les Bois
  • Tchefuncte Park
  • Spring Haven 
  • St. Tammany West Multiplex 
  • Black River Estates 

Goodbee:

These areas have an estimated time of return of today:

  • The Willows
  • Willow Bend
  • Fox Branch
  • Deer Cross 

Lacombe:

  • 98% of downtown/in town — today
10:37 a.m. ET, September 3, 2021

New York Federal Emergency Declaration approved, governor says

From CNN's Elizabeth Joseph

A building in Queens, New York, is damaged on September 2. Some of the occupants were killed when several feet of water collapsed the wall to their basement apartment and flooded it.
A building in Queens, New York, is damaged on September 2. Some of the occupants were killed when several feet of water collapsed the wall to their basement apartment and flooded it. (Mark Lennihan/AP)

The Federal Emergency Declaration request for 14 downstate counties across New York following widespread damage caused by Hurricane Ida’s remnants has been approved by President Biden, Gov. Kathy Hochul announced at a news conference Friday morning.

“I’m very happy that’s going to bring in resources to help with evacuation and shelter support. We’re also working with FEMA, the White House, and our delegation to ensure that we get everything that New Yorkers need.” she said.

CNN reported earlier that Biden approved an emergency declaration for New York and New Jersey late Thursday night after at least 39 people died in those two states alone as remnants of Hurricane Ida unleashed deadly flooding from Virginia to New England.

10:15 a.m. ET, September 3, 2021

Environmental Protection Agency issues a second emergency fuel waiver after Hurricane Ida

From CNN's Matt Egan

A pump is out of service at a gas station in Hancock County, Mississippi, on September 1.
A pump is out of service at a gas station in Hancock County, Mississippi, on September 1. (Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

Facing a shortage of fuel after Hurricane Ida, the Environmental Protection Agency is issuing a second emergency fuel waiver for Louisiana and Mississippi.

The EPA said late Thursday it decided to further cut red tape because of an “extreme and unusual” fuel situation impacting the supply of gasoline after the Category 4 storm. About two-thirds of the gas stations in New Orleans and Baton Rouge are without gas, according to GasBuddy.

The agency said the waiver only applies in Louisiana and Mississippi and will allow for the production, sale and distribution of winter gasoline, before the addition of ethanol. The EPA cited requests from the energy industry for this regulatory relief.

This is on top of the emergency fuel waivers announced by the EPA on Monday to improve fuel supply in the region. 

Both waivers deal with environmental regulations that under normal circumstances require the use of low volatility gasoline during the summer months to limit ozone pollution.

In short, these steps are aimed at further easing the supply crunch caused by Hurricane Ida.

9:28 a.m. ET, September 3, 2021

These before-and-after satellite images show how severe the flooding is in New Jersey

From CNN's Paul P. Murphy

Satellite images from Maxar Technologies captured the flooding devastation remnants of Ida brought to parts of New Jersey.

Here's the before-and-after images of TD Bank Ballpark in Bridgewater Township, New Jersey:

TD Bank Ballpark in Bridgewater Township, New Jersey, on August 25, 2021.
TD Bank Ballpark in Bridgewater Township, New Jersey, on August 25, 2021. (Satellite image © 2021 Maxar Technologies)

TD Bank Ballpark in Bridgewater Township, New Jersey, on September 2, 2021.
TD Bank Ballpark in Bridgewater Township, New Jersey, on September 2, 2021. (Satellite image © 2021 Maxar Technologies)

And here's what the roads and railroad tracks in Manville, New Jersey, looked like before and after the flooding:

Manville, New Jersey, on August 25, 2021.
Manville, New Jersey, on August 25, 2021. (Satellite image © 2021 Maxar Technologies)

Manville, New Jersey, on September 2, 2021.
Manville, New Jersey, on September 2, 2021. (Satellite image © 2021 Maxar Technologies)
9:55 a.m. ET, September 3, 2021

At least 25 people have died and 6 are missing in New Jersey, governor's office says

From CNN’s Mirna Alsharif

Gov. Phil Murphy speaks in Millburn, New Jersey, on September 3.
Gov. Phil Murphy speaks in Millburn, New Jersey, on September 3. (WABC)

At least 25 people have died and six are missing in New Jersey after the remnants of Hurricane Ida pummeled cities in the East, Alyana Alfaro, Gov. Phil Murphy's press secretary, told CNN Friday morning.

That marks an increase of two deaths from what the governor reported Thursday and raised the regional death toll to 48.

Details about the two deaths and six missing people are expected to be released by Murphy’s office later in the day, Alfaro said.

About 4.5 million people in the Northeast remained under flood warnings Friday morning, mostly in northeastern New Jersey, as rainwater flows into larger creeks, streams, and rivers. Some rivers in the Northeast are forecast to remain above flood stage into the weekend, though many are already receding.