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July 6, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois parade shooting news

Police reveal past incidents with suspected Highland Park gunman
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Follow the latest news on the Highland Park, Illinois, Fourth of July parade shooting here and read more about today’s developments in the posts below.

Highland Park parent describes moments during the shooting when he was separated from his kids

The community of Highland Park, Illinois, is coming together after a mass shooting that killed seven people at a Fourth of July parade on Monday. Here’s what they are saying about how their life has changed:

Ben Zeller

Zeller, 45, returned to the scene of the mass shooting for the first time Wednesday, two days after he, his wife, his parents and his kids fled for their lives. His children, aged 9 and 12, were separated from the adults during the chaos of the shooting, and Zeller’s memory of what exactly he did in that time was foggy.

“I don’t remember all of it. Panic set in. I wasn’t sure where my children were. I was told there was another set of shots. I don’t remember it,” he said. 

Once the shooting stopped, he got a call from a family friend who was with his child, and then a text from a friend for his other child. They both were safe.

Zeller has lived in Highland Park for about six years, lured by the good schools, proximity to the botanic gardens and lakefront and public parks. The safety, too, though he’s not sure about that now.

“Nowhere is safe I guess,” he said. “As long as there are violent, angry people with access to military-style weaponry, you’re not safe anywhere. I don’t think I’m any less safe, but it’s hard not to feel that way. You know what I mean?”

Colleen Jenn

She has always had trouble sleeping at night, but now Jenn says she can’t sleep at all after hearing the “pop pop pop” of the gunman’s rifle at the parade on Monday.

“That’s all I hear,” she said. “It’s an eerie thing. Once you experience it, you’ll never forget it.”

Jenn, a city girl who has lived in New York and Chicago, has been renting a home in suburban Highland Park for 18 years. She recently considered moving back to Chicago, but decided against it due to concerns about safety.

“I wanted the freedom to be able to walk anywhere I wanted without the fear somebody was going to grab my person or accost me,” she said.

Instead of moving, she bought her longtime rental. The purchase closed last Wednesday — fortuitous timing, she said.

“We kind of took it for granted here that everything is going to be safe,” she said. “I used to live in Chicago for a while. You always locked your doors. Up here it’s different, the culture is a little different. For a long time, this was considered a bastion of safety. It doesn’t seem to be that way now.”

Child injured during Highland Park shooting is in critical but stable condition

A child that was injured in Monday’s mass shooting in Highland Park is currently in critical but stable condition.

“UChicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital received one patient who remains in critical, but stable condition,” the hospital tells CNN.

Yesterday, NorthShore University Health System spokesman Jim Anthony said in a statement that “One patient (an 8-year-old boy) was transported to University of Chicago Comer Children’s Hospital.”

Highland Park mayor says shooter needs to "pay full price for what he’s done to our hometown”

Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering

Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering told CNN on Wednesday that it is important that Robert E. Crimo face justice for terrorizing her community.

“It’s vitally important. And, as I said at the beginning of this tragedy, I was seriously hoping he was alive because he needs to pay a full price for what he’s done to our hometown,” the mayor said.

The mayor said this act of violence can happen in any city and said a lot needs to be done to fix this situation.

She said, “this is no way for people to live, this is not what freedom is about.”

When the mayor was asked what a guilty plea would mean for the people of Highland Park, Rotering said, “I think for people to hear that would give them a sense of closure, but frankly it’s going to take us a very long time to heal from this.”

The Highland Park gunman appeared in court today. Here's the latest on the parade shooting investigation.

FBI agents investigate the scene on Tuesday, July 5, a day after the shooting in Highland Park, Illinois.

A judge ordered Wednesday that Highland Park, Illinois, shooter Robert E. Crimo III be held in jail without bond after being charged with seven counts of first-degree murder.

The state filed a written petition for no bail and said they would seek a conviction with a sentence of life in prison. Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart said a conviction would result in a sentence of life imprisonment without parole, but more charges could be filed in the future.

The shooter admitted he carried out the attack, prosecutors said in court Wednesday. Crimo told authorities in a voluntary statement that he “looked down his sights, aimed and opened fire” on paradegoers, emptying two 30-round magazines before loading his weapon with a third and firing again, Lake County Assistant State’s Attorney Ben Dillon alleged during a virtual bail hearing.

Crimo, who appeared at the virtual hearing wearing black, was appointed a public defender and is due in court again July 28.

Here are other key developments from the investigation:

Parade shooter “seriously contemplated” carrying out second attack in another city, police say: Law enforcement said that the gunman considered carrying out another attack in Madison, Wisconsin, with an additional weapon he had in his car. “Investigators did develop some information that it appears when he drove to Madison, he was driving around, however, he did see a celebration that was occurring in Madison, and he seriously contemplated using the firearm he had in his vehicle to commit another shooting in Madison,” said Christopher Covelli of the Lake County Sheriff’s Office. The shooter had approximately 60 rounds of ammunition in his car, Covelli said.

Shooter’s cell phone was recovered: According to Covelli, the shooter’s cell phone — which was dumped in Middleton, Wisconsin — was recovered by the FBI on Tuesday and is being processed now. Covelli said he didn’t want to speculate on the shooter’s motives, saying, “his motivation isn’t necessarily clear.” “I don’t want to go specifically into what he told investigators, however, he had some type of affinity towards the number four and seven and inverse was seven, four,” the deputy chief said. According to Covelli, the shooter’s affinity “comes from music that he’s interested in.”

FBI told Madison, Wisconsin, police chief that gunman could be in the area after parade shooting: Madison, Wisconsin, Police Chief Shon Barnes said the FBI alerted them that the shooter could be in the area on Monday afternoon. “On Monday, July 4 at approximately 5 p.m. the FBI contacted the Madison Police Department and requested mobilization of our SWAT team. They believed the suspect could be in the Madison area,” he said in a news conference Wednesday. Barnes said that even after Crimo was taken into custody, the FBI was still looking for information in Wisconsin.

State prosecutor says “many more charges” to come against Highland Park shooter: Rinehart, who is handling the state’s case against the Highland Park shooter, said Wednesday that he anticipates that Crimo will face “many more charges.” Rinehart said, “Yesterday, I referred to the fact that there were additional charges, many more charges against this defendant because so many people were hurt. For each individual that was hurt, people can anticipate an attempted murder charge as well as an aggravated battery with a firearm charge.” Rinehart noted that all of those charges are felonies that carry “serious prison time associated with them.” Rinehart said that he anticipated that those additional charges will be filed later this month.

FBI director says federal charges are possible: FBI Director Christopher Wray said Wednesday that federal charges could be brought in the parade shooting. “If the facts gathered end up supporting a federal prosecution, then we will work with the US attorney’s office to pursue prosecution on the federal side as well,” Wray said while speaking at an event in London on Chinese espionage and hacking. Wray, who noted that state charges have been brought against the suspect, said the bureau has been assisting local and state authorities investigating the mass shooting. The bureau is providing help with crime scene and evidence collection, and victims assistance experts to help those affected by the attack. 

Seventh victim of Highland Park mass shooting identified: The seventh victim of the mass shooting was identified by the Cook County Medical Examiner as 69-year-old Eduardo Uvaldo of Waukegan, Illinois. Uvaldo “was pronounced dead today at 7:47 a.m. at Evanston Hospital. An autopsy will be performed in the coming days,” said a press release from the medical examiner.  Six of the dead had been identified by the Lake County Coroner, and one by Cook County Medical Examiner.

Read more about the shooting victims here and the investigation here.

CNN’s Travis Caldwell, Jason Hanna and Dakin Andone, Rebekah Riess, Evan Perez and Melissa Alonso contributed to this report.

Madison, Wisconsin, police chief says FBI told them that parade shooter could be in the area

Madison, Wisconsin, Police Chief Shon Barnes said the FBI alerted them that Robert E. Crimo II, the man accused of killing at least seven people at a 4th of July parade in Illinois, could be in the area on Monday afternoon.

On Wednesday, authorities said that Crimo went to Madison after the mass shooting in Highland Park and contemplated another attack.

“On Monday, July 4 at approximately 5 p.m. the FBI contacted the Madison Police Department and requested mobilization of our SWAT team. They believed the suspect could be in the Madison area. Our SWAT team began the process of mobilization and staging when we were subsequently informed that the suspect was already in custody in Illinois,” Barnes said at a news conference on Wednesday.

He said even after Crimo was taken into custody, the FBI was still looking for information in Wisconsin. Barnes said Crimo’s cellphone was found in the nearby town of Middleton.

Barnes went on to say “according to authorities in Highland Park, the suspect observed the celebration here in Madison and decided not to attack the celebration for reasons undisclosed by the investigators.”

The chief noted that the authorities did not say where the suspect observed this celebration.

People rushed into store on Highland Park parade route as gunman fired from rooftop, footage shows

Security camera footage shows parade spectators rush into the Gearhead Outfitters store in Highland Park, Illinois, to seek shelter after a gunman opened fire from the roof of a nearby building on Monday.

The store, located on the corner of Central Avenue and 2nd Street, was on the 4th of July parade route, across the street from the building that authorities say the shooter used.

The video shows a handful of people milling around in the store just before people rush into the building. A woman falls to the ground and has to put her shoe back on as people rush past her. A man helps her get up and move away from the entrance.

Another woman enters the store on her hands and knees — using her body to shield a child crawling underneath her.

A man, identified as store manager Tony Brosio, can be seen directing people into the store and takes some of them into a room off-camera.

Brosio can also be seen urging people to get away from the doors as they come inside.

The owner of the chain of stores, Ted Herget, who lives in Jonesboro, Arkansas, told CNN that Brosio led some of the people to the basement where they keep a lot of the store’s inventory.

Herget and his wife bought the Highland Park location company in 2019. Herget said that he was proud of Brosio for keeping the store open and rushing to help so many people.

“I hope I would be able to do the same thing. I mean, I just watched that video, and I’m hoping I would be that guy,” Herget said.

Brosio’s wife, Abby, and his father were wounded in the shooting, Herget said, but are doing okay physically.

Herget said his company is arranging to provide grief counselors for his employees and said they would need to think about security protocols at the chain’s stores.

“We’re more on the emotional side of this right now. Making sure these kids have got what they need to heal throughout this,” Herget said.

He said it was inspiring to see Brosio’s instincts kick in and help people during the crisis.

The company said in a statement that the store will remain closed for now, to allow employees time to heal.

“We are so thankful to the first responders who acted quickly to help keep everyone safe. We are also so proud of our Highland Park team for acting quickly to welcome people in for protection. Their actions were truly heroic and in the midst of tragedy we can find peace in our community coming together to support one another,” the company said in a statement. 

Wisconsin mayor: It's "deeply disturbing" Highland Park shooter contemplated an attack in Madison

The mayor of Madison, Wisconsin, is reacting to the recent news that Highland Park shooter Robert E. Crimo III traveled to the city and contemplated an attack in the area.

“Today’s news that the suspected shooter traveled to Madison and contemplated violence here is deeply disturbing and only underscores the fact that we need a national approach to dealing with gun violence. Weapons of war have no place in our communities. While I appreciate the bipartisan agreement reached last week, Congress must pass common sense gun safety laws to protect our communities. Assault weapons and large-capacity magazines must be banned,” Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway said in a statement.

The statement said Americans should not have to live in fear of gun violence in their communities and schools.

“Here in Madison — and in cities across the country — we are doing what we can to control illegal guns, hold people accountable for gun violence and invest in violence interruption and prevention. But we cannot do this alone. We need Congress to do its job and protect our communities,” the mayor said.

Highland Park woman who fled shooting says she's scarred by what she saw: It took "away my peace"

Karen Abrams at a Veteran's Memorial Park turned into a memorial for those killed in the 4th of July parade shooting.

Karen Abrams, 67, has for decades claimed a spot for Highland Park’s July 4 parade outside Ross’s on the corner of 2nd St. and Central Ave. — the same location where the gunman opened fire on Monday.

But she wasn’t there this year. Instead, she set up her lawn chairs a couple of blocks east, a difference of about 500 feet that allowed her to flee the area when the gunshots began.

“My kids were really devastated because normally, for 27 or 28 years, we were right there where the shooter was. Yesterday morning they said, ‘What made you move mom?’” she said. “Well, I went out at 7 in the morning to put all my chairs down and they were already taken. My decision was — God works in mysterious ways.”

Though she wasn’t physically hurt, Abrams was scarred by what she saw.

“There were people walking with blood all over them. I stopped one man and asked if he was OK, and he said, ‘It’s not my blood, but I’ll never be OK again.’ There was a woman out here standing on the corner screaming her kid’s name. She couldn’t find her child,” she said.

On Wednesday, Abrams wore a shirt saying “Highland Park Strong” and spoke to CNN from a Veteran’s Memorial Park that has become a memorial to the shooting victims. With tears in her eyes, she said the shooting had changed her home of 42 years.

“What this did to me and for me was take away my peace, take away the fact that my grandchildren and children can live in a community like this that’s safe, so whatever I can do to make a statement is what I’m going to do,” she said. “I’ve got to do something to help change the laws. I don’t know how I’m going to do it, I haven’t quite figured that out yet, but I will. You’ll see.”

More than $2 million has been raised for 2-year-old who lost parents in Highland Park shooting

In the 24 hours since a family member started a GoFundMe campaign to support 2-year-old Aiden McCarthy after his parents were killed in the Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting, more than $2 million has been raised in donations from tens of thousands of people.

Irina, 35, and Kevin McCarthy, 37, are among the at least seven people who died in the July Fourth parade massacre on Monday.

Their 2-year-old son, Aiden, is now left without his parents and will be cared for by other family members, according to Irina Colon, a relative of Irina McCarthy’s.

The verified GoFundMe campaign was started by Colon on Tuesday afternoon and by that evening had raised well over $1 million. As of Wednesday afternoon, the campaign has raised more than $2.4 million of its $500,000 goal.

More than 44,000 people have donated to the campaign, with donations ranging from $5 to $18,000.

Colon did not immediately respond to a CNN request for comment on the surge of donations Wednesday.

On Tuesday, Colon told CNN that Aiden was found alive underneath his father after the deadly shooting at the parade and is doing OK.

“On behalf of his family, and with their permission, I am establishing this fundraiser to support him and the caregivers who will be tasked with raising, caring for, and supporting Aiden as he and his support system embark on this unexpected journey.” Colon wrote in part on the GoFundMe page.

Here's what's in the bipartisan gun safety bill Biden signed into law last month 

President Joe Biden signs the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act gun safety bill at the White House on June 25.

Monday’s shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, has brought renewed attention to a gun safety bill that was passed in Congress on June 24 and was signed into law by President Biden.

The bill marked a significant bipartisan breakthrough on one of the most contentious policy issues in Washington. “God willing, it’s going to save a lot of lives,” Biden said at the White House as he finished signing the bill on June 25.

In a statement following the Highland Park mass shooting, Biden noted that he had “surged federal law enforcement to assist in the search for the shooter,” and pointed to the gun safety legislation. “But there is much more work to do, and I’m not going to give up fighting the epidemic of gun violence,” Biden added.

The package represents the most significant new federal legislation to address gun violence since the expired 10-year assault weapons ban of 1994 — though it fails to ban any weapons and falls far short of what Biden and his party had advocated for, and polls show most Americans want to see.

The compromise legislation on gun safety was unveiled on June 21, and includes money for school safety, mental health, state crisis intervention programs and incentives for states to include juvenile records in the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, which would provide a more comprehensive background check for those between the ages of 18 and 21 who want to buy guns.

The legislation was finalized after days of haggling by lawmakers over several sticking points that had raised questions over whether the negotiations would fall apart.

Here’s what’s in the bill:

$750 million to help states implement and run crisis intervention programs: This money can be used to implement and manage red flag programs, which are aimed at keeping guns out of the hands of those who pose a threat to themselves or others. It also can be used for other crisis intervention programs like mental health courts, drug courts and veteran courts.

Whether the money could be used for things other than red flag laws was a primary sticking point at the end of the negotiations, and Republicans were able to secure money for states that don’t have red flag laws but have other crisis intervention programs.

Closing the so-called boyfriend loophole: This legislation closes a years-old loophole in domestic violence law that barred individuals who had been convicted of domestic violence crimes against spouses, or partners with whom they shared children or cohabitated with, from having guns. Old statutes didn’t include intimate partners who may not live together, be married or share children. The new bill would bar anyone who is convicted of a domestic violence crime against someone they have a “continuing serious relationship of a romantic or intimate nature” with from having a gun. The provision isn’t retroactive.

The bill, however, would allow those convicted of misdemeanor domestic violence crimes to restore their gun rights after five years if they haven’t committed other crimes.

Requires more gun sellers to register as Federally Licenses Firearm Dealers: The bill goes after individuals who sell guns as primary sources of income but have previously evaded registering as Federally Licensed Firearm Dealers. This is significant because federally licensed dealers are required to administer background checks before they sell a gun to someone.

More thorough reviews of people 18-21 who want to buy guns: The bill encourages states to include juvenile records in the National Instant Criminal Background Check system with grants, as well as implement a new protocol for checking those records. It gives NICS three days to review an individual’s record. If something potentially disqualifying comes up, NICS gets an additional seven days. If the review is not completed by then, the gun transfer goes through.

Read more about the bill here.

CNN’s Donald Judd contributed reporting to this post

Parade shooter contemplated carrying out second attack in another city, police say

Christopher Covelli, deputy chief of the Lake County Sheriff's Office, speaks during a press conference on July 6.

Law enforcement said that the gunman in Monday’s July 4 parade shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, considered carrying out another attack in Madison, Wisconsin, with an additional weapon he had in his car.

“Investigators did develop some information that it appears when he drove to Madison, he was driving around, however, he did see a celebration that was occurring in Madison, and he seriously contemplated using the firearm he had in his vehicle to commit another shooting in Madison,” said Christopher Covelli of the Lake County Sheriff’s Office.

The shooter, Robert E. Crimo III, had approximately 60 rounds of ammunition in his car, Covelli said.

“We don’t have information to suggest he planned to drive to Madison initially to commit another attack. We do believe he was driving around following the first attack and saw the celebration,” Covelli said.  

“Indications are that he hadn’t put enough thought or research into it,” Covelli added.

According to Covelli, the shooter’s cell phone — which was dumped in Middleton, Wisconsin — was recovered by the FBI on Tuesday and is being processed now.

Covelli said he didn’t want to speculate on motives, saying, “his motivation isn’t necessarily clear.” 

“I don’t want to go specifically into what he told investigators, however, he had some type of affinity towards the number four and seven and inverse was seven, four,” the deputy chief said. According to Covelli, the shooter’s affinity “comes from music that he’s interested in.”

Covelli said Crimo will now go through the intake process at the Lake County Jail, where they will go through a number of criteria questions and he’ll be classified on where he should be placed within the jail.

“Depending on how those questions turn up, he might be placed in an individual cell. That’s something that the jail will work on and they go through their internal process,” Covelli added.

CNN’s Rebekah Riess contributed reporting to this post.

"We're all standing as a community": Highland Park residents come together after mass shooting

Community members write messages at a memorial site in Highland Park, Illinois on July 5. 

Two days after a suspected gunman killed seven people at a July Fourth parade in Highland Park, Illinois, the community is trying to cope with the tragedy. Here’s what some people are saying.

Cristy and Hal Steinberg

Cristy Steinberg, 42, grew up in nearby Buffalo Grove and lived in Chicago, but she and her husband decided to move to Highland Park about 11 years ago for classic suburban reasons: a bigger backyard, better schools and the community feel.

She has been to the July 4 parade every year since. Her son Hal, 12, pointed out it is her favorite day of the year.

“I love this day. I look forward to July 4 every — literally, he’s like, ‘Mom it’s your favorite day of the year.’ I love the parade,” she said.

In 2019, Hal marched in the parade as part of a float for Dr. Jessica Cohen Orthodontics. On Wednesday morning, Hal wrote the word “Together” in marker on the window of the orthodontist’s office in a show of community support.

“We’re all standing as a community. It’s not just one person that’s going to do everything. We have to work together,” Hal said. “Even me as a 12-year-old boy, we were talking, me and my friends about this, this should just never happen, and we’re all together about that.”

Fred Kroll

Fred Kroll, 67, was positioned with his family outside Walker Bros Original Pancake House during the parade — a spot he called “ground zero” of the massacre. He saw two people lying lifeless, and he tried to aid others who had been shot or wounded. One man bleeding from the head came up to Kroll and asked if he had been shot; fortunately, the head wound appeared to be shrapnel rather than a bullet.

Kroll grew up in nearby Skokie but moved to Highland Park 36 years ago for its community feel and its array of welcoming trees, he said. He and several friends have a regular morning coffee chat at That Little French Guy café, and on Wednesday morning he waved and said hello to a series of familiar faces who walked by.

His wife and daughter are traumatized by the shooting, but he insisted he’ll be staying put in Highland Park, undeterred by the violence he saw.

“I don’t know if it’s my age or life experience, but it’s done, it’s over, and I’m not gonna let this kid affect my life,” he said.

Matthew Berk

Matthew Berk, 31, grew up in Highland Park and met his now-wife here at Highland Park High School. He left for college at Michigan and then worked in Los Angeles for about a decade, but in August 2020 he and his wife decided to return to their community to be close to family and a support system.

“We said — and this is the irony of the conversation in light of what’s happened — let’s get our family out of L.A., let’s get back to where we have a support system… Let’s get our family home and set roots down in a place where we want to start raising our kids, in a loving, generous, kind, beautiful (community),” he said. “The shame of it is Highland Park is and will continue to be a really wonderful community, just with this gaping wound.”

On Wednesday, he sat outside That Little French Guy café next to an empty chair with a handmade sign saying, “Let’s talk.”

“I don’t have the words to process it, so I think one of the reasons I wanted to come sit with the sign and an invitation to talk is to try, to process it together,” he said.

Husband of shooting victim describes moment he learned his wife was killed

Highland Park shooting victim Katherine Goldstein, center, with her daughters Cassie and Alana.

The family of a Highland Park parade shooting victim is speaking out about what happened during the attack.

Katherine Goldstein, 64, was at the parade with her daughter Cassie, according to Katherine’s husband, Craig Goldstein, who rushed to the parade to try to help his daughter once he got a phone call from her telling him about the shooting. 

“My daughter, Cassie, looked up at the rooftop and saw the man with the gun. She said ‘Mom, we have to run,’ and they ran,” Goldstein told CNN. “They were running side by side when a bullet entered Katie’s chest.” 

Goldstein said Cassie saw her mother fall to the ground, but she got the chance to tell her “I love you” one last time before she closed her eyes. A stranger then grabbed his daughter and told her she had to keep running, according to Goldstein.

“I could hear Cassie in the background and she was screaming, ‘Mom is dead! Don’t come!’ She was afraid for us. It seemed unreal, but I didn’t want to leave Cassie by herself. I wanted to find Cassie,” he said.

Goldstein told CNN his wife was a very kind, selfless and funny person who was devoted to her family and spent her evenings playing games with her daughters. 

“I could not imagine a better mother,” he said.

“She loved to go bird watching. In the spring she was out every morning with her binoculars,” he added.

Goldstein is survived by her two daughters and husband. 

State prosecutor: "Many more charges" to come against Highland Park shooter

Lake County State's Attorney Eric Rinehart speaks during a press conference on July 6.

Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart, who is handling the state’s case against Highland Park shooter Robert Crimo III, said Wednesday that he anticipates that Crimo will face “many more charges.”

“Yesterday, I referred to the fact that there were additional charges, many more charges against this defendant because so many people were hurt. For each individual that was hurt, people can anticipate an attempted murder charge as well as an aggravated battery with a firearm charge.” 

Rinehart noted that all of those charges are felonies that carry “serious prison time associated with them.” 

“Other people were attempted to be murdered, people who were not shot. So there are many different charges we are reviewing with respect to the other individuals who have sadly been injured by this,” Rinehart said.

“Every time he fires a bullet at an individual, he is committing aggravated discharge of a weapon, whether he hit someone or not. There will be many more charges coming in the coming weeks,” the state attorney said.

Rinehart said that he anticipated that those additional charges will be filed later this month.

Lake County state's attorney reaffirms his support for a nationwide ban on assault weapons

After the mass shooting in his hometown of Highland Park, Illinois, Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart said there should be a nationwide ban on assault weapons.

“The state of Illinois and the United States should ban these types of weapons. We had this ban from 1994 to 2004 with bipartisan support,” he noted. “Everything shows that these types of horrifying, devastating incidents went down during that time. My position as a public safety professional, as one of the many individuals responsible for the safety of the people in Lake County, we should have a statewide and national ban on assault weapons.”

He noted that the gap in the state’s gun laws is due to the fact that there is no ban on assault weapons.

“With the respect to the red flag laws, we have to look at it on a case-by-case basis,” he added. “With respect to holes in gun laws, we need an assault weapon ban and we need to make sure that law enforcement is using the red flag law, the firearm restraining order law.”

Seventh victim of Highland Park mass shooting identified 

Highland Park shooting victim Eduardo Uvaldo.

The seventh victim of the mass shooting on July 4 has been identified by the Cook County Medical Examiner as 69-year-old Eduardo Uvaldo of Waukegan, Illinois. 

Uvaldo “was pronounced dead today at 7:47 a.m. at Evanston Hospital. An autopsy will be performed in the coming days,” said a press release from the medical examiner.  

Six of the dead had been identified by the Lake County Coroner, and one by Cook County Medical Examiner.

FBI director says federal charges are possible in Highland Park July 4 parade shooting

FBI Director Christopher Wray testifies during a Senate hearing in Washington, DC on May 25.

FBI Director Christopher Wray said Wednesday that federal charges could be brought in the Highland Park, Illinois, July 4th parade shooting.

“If the facts gathered end up supporting a federal prosecution, then we will work with the US attorney’s office to pursue prosecution on the federal side as well,” Wray said while speaking at an event in London on Chinese espionage and hacking.

Wray, speaking in London following an unrelated event with MI5 Director General Ken McCallum, noted that state charges have been brought against the suspect.

Wray also noted the bureau has been assisting local and state authorities investigating the mass shooting. The bureau is providing help with crime scene and evidence collection, and victims assistance experts to help those affected by the attack. 

Prosecutor: Shooting suspect will be held without bond

A judge ruled that Highland Park shooting suspect Robert Crimo III would remain in jail on Wednesday during a court appearance in Lake County, Illinois.

The state filed a written petition for no bail and said they would seek a conviction with a sentence of life in prison. Lake County Bond Court Judge Theodore Potkonjak ordered Crimo to be held without bond.

“The judge ruled he would be held without bond and there is probable cause to hold him at this time for seven counts of first-degree murder,” Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart told reporters outside Lake County courthouse after the hearing.

“Based on the information that the investigation has produced so far, the judge found that the evidence was such a level that he would be held without bond also because of the fact that it is a mandatory life sentence,” he added.

Additional details were developed during Crimo’s bond hearing.

Assistant State’s Attorney Ben Dillon outlined the events on July 4, stating that surveillance video from the scene showed a person running west with a black bag over the shoulder in the immediate aftermath of the shooting. As he was running, an object wrapped in cloth fell onto the pavement. The suspect left the object and kept running. The object was recovered and identified as a Smith & Wesson M&P15 — an AR-15 style semi-automatic rifle — with one round in the chamber, but no magazine inserted, Dillion said.

Crimo provided investigators with a voluntary statement confessing to his actions and identified himself on still images as the person fleeing the scene when the rifle fell out of the bag, according to Dillon.

Dillon added that Crimo told law enforcement he “looked down his sights, aimed and opened fire” on paradegoers and fired two full magazines before putting in a third in a rifle. Crimo continued to fire before fleeing the rooftop, Dillon said. Three 30-round magazines and 83 spent shell casings were recovered, he said.

Crimo also said that he dressed up as a woman and covered his tattoos with makeup to avoid being recognized, according to the prosecutor.

The judge scheduled the next hearing in Crimo’s case for July 28.

Highland Park shooting suspect appears in court after being charged with 7 counts of murder 

The man suspected of killing at least seven people and wounding dozens at a Fourth of July parade in a Chicago suburb is making his first court appearance.

The suspect faces seven counts of first-degree murder “for the killing spree he has unleashed against our community,” Lake County, Illinois, State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart said at a news conference Tuesday.

A conviction would result in a sentence of life imprisonment without parole, he said.

The suspect, according to authorities, opened fire from a rooftop in Highland Park as the parade got underway just after 10 a.m. CT on Monday. More than 70 high-velocity rounds were fired with a rifle “similar to an AR-15,” said Lake County Major Crime Task Force spokesperson Chris Covelli.

2-year-old orphaned in parade shooting was protected by father before his own death, senator says

A two-year-old boy was left orphaned by Monday’s mass shooting.

“He was pulled out from underneath his father, who was still bleeding, by good Samaritans,” said Sen. Tammy Duckworth who was in the Highland Park emergency operations center when police briefed the mayor on the child.

“Then they went to work on his dad because his dad’s leg was still bleeding,” Duckworth told CNN.

A couple then “scooped him up and took him to safety, and then his dad died on the scene,” according to Duckworth.

Kevin McCarthy, 37, died protecting his son, Aiden, according to the boy’s grandfather, Michael Levberg, who spoke to the Chicago Sun-Times. Levberg’s 35-year-old daughter Irina — McCarthy’s wife and Aiden’s mother — also was among the seven people killed as they watched the parade.

What we know about the victims of the Highland Park parade shooting

Highland Park shooting victims Nicolas Toledo, Jacki Sundheim, Irina McCarthy, Kevin McCarthy and Stephen Straus.

A gunman killed seven people in Monday’s shooting at a July 4 parade in Highland Park, Illinois, leaving their families and community forever changed after another mass shooting in America.

Irina and Kevin McCarthy, aged 35 and 37, were identified by the Lake County Coroner’s Office Tuesday. Their son, Aiden, was found alive and taken to safety in the aftermath of the violence, the family told CNN.

Katherine Goldstein, 64, of Highland Park; Jacquelyn Sundheim, 63, of Highland Park; Stephen Straus, 88, of Highland Park; and Nicolas Toledo-Zaragoza, 78, of Morelos, Mexico, were the four other victims identified. A seventh victim died at a hospital outside of Lake County, according to the Coroner’s Office.

Here’s what is known about some of the victims so far:

Irina and Kevin McCarthy, who were killed in the shooting, are the parents of a toddler who was found alive, according to a family member.

Irina Colon, who was related to Irina McCarthy, shared an undated photo with CNN of the couple at their wedding in Chicago.

Colon said she was not at the parade and found out about the couple’s death from Irina McCarthy’s father. The couple’s 2-year-old son, Aiden, will now be cared for by family members, Colon said.

verified GoFundMe campaign that Colon began said that in the aftermath of the violence, the young child was taken to safety by community members before his grandparents were located.

Jacki Sundheim was also identified by her synagogue as one of the people killed.

The North Shore Congregation Israel in Glencoe said in a statement Sundheim was a lifelong congregant and a member of the staff, having been a preschool teacher and events coordinator.

“There are no words sufficient to express the depth of our grief for Jacki’s death and sympathy for her family and loved ones,” the statement said.

Nicolas Toledo, father of eight and grandfather to many, had been visiting his family in Highland Park from Mexico and was identified as a victim in Monday’s shooting, an official from the state of Morelos told CNN.

Toledo loved fishing, painting and going on walks with his family in the park, one of his granddaughters, Kimberly Rangel, told CNN affiliate WBBM.

Toledo’s family set up a GoFundMe page to raise money to repatriate him to Mexico.

Read more about the victims here:

Highland Park Parade shooting victim is off life support and fighting for his life, daughter says

Eduardo Uvaldo, a 69-year-old man who was shot at the Highland Park July Fourth parade, is off life support and fighting for his life at Evanston Hospital, his daughter Katrina Uvaldo told CNN on Tuesday. 

“Doctors said there’s nothing they can do,” she said, but noted he was still breathing on his own. “We need everyone to keep us in their prayers.”

According to a verified GoFundMe campaign, Uvaldo was shot in the arm and then the back of the head. His wife and grandson also sustained injuries, his daughter said. 

She told CNN her mother, Maria Uvaldo, got struck with bullet fragments on her forehead and hand. “Physically, she’s good. Emotionally, she’s distraught,” his daughter said. 

Eduardo and Maria Uvaldo celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in February, she added.  

Eduardo’s grandson was shot in the forearm but didn’t even realize he got hit until he arrived at the hospital with Maria, Katrina told CNN.

Katrina described her father as hardworking. He occasionally liked to remind his daughters that he worked for 30 years and never missed a single day, she said.  

Eduardo — who dislikes crowds — tends to avoid parades, Katrina said. But he liked the one at Highland Park, and every year it would be the only one he’d attend, she said.

Katrina said her father will turn 70 this Friday.  

Police identified 6 of 7 victims in Highland Park parade shooting

A community member lights a candle at a memorial site for victims of the Highland Park shooting in Illinois on July 5.

Police on Tuesday identified six of the seven victims killed in the Highland Park July Fourth parade shooting.

Jennifer Banek, Lake County Coroner, read the list of names during a Tuesday news conference. The victims are as follows:

  • 64-year-old Katherine Goldstein of Highland Park
  • 35-year-old Irina McCarthy of Highland Park
  • 37-year-old Kevin McCarthy of Highland Park
  • 63-year-old Jacquelyn Sundheim of Highland Park
  • 88-year-old Stephen Straus of Highland Park
  • 78-year-old Nicolas Toledo-Zaragoza of Morelos, Mexico

A seventh victim died at a hospital outside of Lake County, Banek said.

Parade shooting suspect expected to make first court appearance today

The man suspected of killing seven people and wounding dozens at a Fourth of July parade in Illinois is expected to make his first court appearance Wednesday.

Robert E. Crimo III, 21, faces seven counts of first-degree murder “for the killing spree he has unleashed against our community,” Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart said at a news conference Tuesday. A conviction would result in a sentence of life imprisonment without parole, he said.

“These are just the first of many charges that will be filed against Mr. Crimo. I want to emphasize that,” Rinehart said, and prosecutors will ask a judge to deny bail.

Police say shooting suspect planned parade attack for weeks

oert E. Crimo III, the 21-year-old man suspected of killing seven people and wounding dozens at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, opened fire from a building as the parade got underway just after 10 a.m. CT on Monday, according to authorities.

More than 70 high-velocity rounds were fired by a rifle “similar to an AR-15,” according to Lake County Major Crime Task Force spokesperson Chris Covelli, and the gunman then fled the area.

Crimo allegedly had another rifle in his vehicle when he was pulled over by police hours after the shooting, Covelli said, and other firearms were recovered from his residence in nearby Highwood.

Crimo is believed by authorities to have planned the attack for weeks, and the rifle used appears to have been purchased legally in Illinois, he said.

Prior contact with police: Crimo had two encounters with police in 2019 over fears for his safety and that of others, information that prompted the city’s mayor to wonder how Crimo was able to later legally obtain firearms.

The Highland Park Police Department received a report in April 2019 that Crimo had earlier attempted suicide, Covelli said Tuesday. Police spoke with Crimo and his parents and the matter was handled by mental health professionals, he said.

In September that year, a family member reported that Crimo threatened “to kill everyone” and had a collection of knives, Covelli said. Police removed 16 knives, a dagger and a sword from their residence. Highland Park police reported the incident to Illinois State Police (ISP,) which said in a news release Tuesday that family members were not willing to file additional complaints.

The knives confiscated by Highland Park police were returned the same day after Crimo’s father claimed they were his, ISP said.

Over the next two years, Crimo legally purchased five firearms, according to Covelli – a combination of rifles, a pistol and possibly a shotgun. ISP confirmed Tuesday that Crimo passed four background checks between June 2020 and September 2021 when purchasing firearms, which included checks of the federal National Instant Criminal Background Check System.

READ MORE

Highland Park parade shooting suspect charged with 7 counts of murder, state's attorney says
The parents of a 2-year-old boy are among the victims of the July Fourth parade shooting
Suspect planned Highland Park parade shooting for weeks and dressed in women's clothing during the attack to conceal his identity, police say
A former preschool teacher and a beloved grandfather are among the victims of a deadly July Fourth parade shooting
America's struggle with mass shootings has changed how these people live their lives
What we know about the Highland Park shooting suspect

READ MORE

Highland Park parade shooting suspect charged with 7 counts of murder, state's attorney says
The parents of a 2-year-old boy are among the victims of the July Fourth parade shooting
Suspect planned Highland Park parade shooting for weeks and dressed in women's clothing during the attack to conceal his identity, police say
A former preschool teacher and a beloved grandfather are among the victims of a deadly July Fourth parade shooting
America's struggle with mass shootings has changed how these people live their lives
What we know about the Highland Park shooting suspect