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America remembers George Floyd

George Floyd honored one year after his death
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Biden adviser says there's no new timeline for police reform legislation

Cedric Richmond, senior adviser to President Biden, said there is no new timetable from the White House on police reform legislation, but said he is optimistic over the state of the negotiations.

Richmond said the administration is “doing everything we can” to get legislation passed including offering any advice or technical assistance asked of it.

“We are very hopeful and optimistic because the negotiations seem to be genuine and substantive right now,” Richmond said on CNN’s The Situation Room Tuesday. 

Richmond said there is not a new timeline from the White House on passing police reform, after the original deadline of today came and went without a bill, and that the President wants something that is right, not rushed. 

“It’s more important to have meaningful legislation than to meet a deadline or a timeline and I think that that came out today in the conversation with the family, that the President wanted something that is right, not necessarily rushed,” he said. 

Richmond would not discuss the negotiations over qualified immunity during the interview, saying those negotiations have been going on behind the scenes and that’s where they should stay. 

Harris says Floyd family has "shown such dignity in the face of such an atrocious tragedy"

Vice President Kamala Harris spoke about her meeting with the family of George Floyd at the White House on Tuesday, saying “they have shown such dignity in the face of such an atrocious tragedy.”

“They have been consistent in using their voice in a way that has been about lifting up other families and other injustices, but doing it with the purpose of compelling action to fix what we know are the problems in the system,” Harris said, speaking from the Department of Justice after ceremonially swearing in Kristen Clarke as the first Black woman to lead the Department of Justice’s civil rights division.

“In their grief, they are so generous in the way that they have been supporting other families and supporting a system that should rightly yield in the face of injustice to what we know needs to be reformed,” she added.

The vice president said she is in awe of their continuing courage, their selflessness and the way they have approached this.

Harris also echoed her written statement after the meeting with Floyd’s family, saying “George Floyd should be alive today.”

She said the administration is watching and waiting to see what comes from the negotiations on police reform on Capitol Hill.

“The work that they have been doing has been I think intensive work throughout the weekends,” Harris said. “So they’re working around the clock from everything I can see and we’re waiting to hear but there seems to be a sense of optimism coming from the Hill and that gives me a sense of optimism and we’ll wait and see.”

Policing bill will be named after George Floyd, family attorney says

Attorney Benjamin Crump

Benjamin Crump, the attorney of George Floyd’s family, said GOP Sen. Tim Scott told him any policing overhaul bill will be named the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. 

Crump and the Floyd family spoke with reporters following their meeting with Democratic Sen. Cory Booker. 

“If we can get meaningful legislation that prevents those killings, then we think it would not only be historic, it would be the right thing to do,” Crump said of the ongoing negotiations to pass a bipartisan bill overhauling policing. 

When asked earlier by reporters if they’re optimistic about a police reform deal getting done, Crump gave them a thumbs up.

Teen who filmed Floyd's final moments: "A part of my childhood was taken from me"

Darnella Frazier, the teenager who was on her way to a Minneapolis store to buy snacks with her young cousin last May 25 when she recorded the clearest video of former police officer Derek Chauvin pressing his knee into George Floyd’s neck for over nine minutes, released a statement on Tuesday to mark the one-year anniversary of Floyd’s death.

“A year ago, today I witnessed a murder. The victim’s name was George Floyd. Although this wasn’t the first time, I’ve seen a Black man get killed at the hands of the police, this is the first time I witnessed it happen in front of me. Right in front of my eyes, a few feet away,” Frazier said in a statement to CNN.

“I didn’t know this man from a can of paint, but I knew his life mattered. I knew that he was in pain. I knew that he was another Black man in danger with no power,” Frazier added. 

Frazier’s video of Floyd’s final moments was widely credited for helping secure a guilty verdict against Chauvin, and Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz publicly thanked her after the trial.

“Taking that video, I think many folks know, is maybe the only reason that Derek Chauvin will go to prison,” Walz said last month.

“A lot of people call me a hero even though I don’t see myself as one. I was just in the right place at the right time,” Frazier said Tuesday.

“Behind this smile, behind these awards, behind the publicity, I’m a girl trying to heal from something I am reminded of every day. Everyone talks about the girl who recorded George Floyd‘s death, but to actually be her is a different story,” Frazier added.

Frazier, now 18, said her life was forever changed by that moment, and she spoke about the challenges she and her family have faced in the year since she witnessed Floyd’s death, adding that she’s suffered from sleeplessness, anxiety and panic attacks in the aftermath.

“A part of my childhood was taken from me. My 9-year-old cousin who witnessed the same thing I did got a part of her childhood taken from her. Having to up and leave because my home was no longer safe, waking up to reporters at my door, closing my eyes at night only to see a man who is brown like me, lifeless on the ground. I couldn’t sleep properly for weeks,” Frazier said.

“I used to shake so bad at night my mom had to rock me to sleep. Hopping from hotel to hotel because we didn’t have a home and looking over our back every day in the process,” the statement read.

The sports world reacts one year after the killing of George Floyd

As the sports world came together to pay their respects to George Floyd after his death in Minnesota a year ago, many organizations are also speaking out on the anniversary of his killing on Tuesday.

Floyd’s death sparked nationwide protests, with many prominent athletes and teams participating in advocacy and demonstrations.

The Women’s National Basketball Players Association released a statement on the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act – a bill that would do things like set up a national registry of police misconduct, ban chokeholds and no-knock warrants and make it easier to prosecute officers for wrongdoing, among other things.

The WNBPA said in a statement it remains hopeful and that the measure is an “important first step for comprehensive policing reform.”

“Excessive force used against communities of color is past crisis-level. Excessive force used against communities of color demands action by Congress,” the statement said.

The National Basketball Players Association tweeted, “How many more need to be killed before Congress takes action?” It urged people to call their senators and tell them to support the bill.

The NBA said a year ago Floyd’s death inspired a social justice movement and called on people to rally against systemic racism, it said in a tweet.

“Today and every day, members of the NBA family stand united in working for change and a future that provides true equality,” the NBA said.

Several high-profile NBA athletes were vocal about the killing of Floyd.

Professional teams in Minnesota – including the Vikings, the Timberwolves, the Lynx, the Wild and Minnesota United – all tweeted messages in Floyd’s memory. Several of them were photos of memorials or murals around the city.

The Players Alliance, the Major League Baseball players group, tweeted a statement pledging to create a more “inclusive, equitable future – both in our game and in our world.”

The NFL said it has been a year filled with “reflection and reckoning, one that has renewed our commitment to build and strengthen our communities.”

It also tweeted a video which featured players talking about how Floyd’s murder affected them.

You can watch that here:

Floyd family attorney says they're "optimistic" Congress is "close" to reaching a bipartisan policing deal

After meeting with GOP Sens. Tim Scott and Lindsey Graham, Benjamin Crump, the attorney of George Floyd’s family, said “we’re optimistic” that Congress is “close, the closest they’ve ever been” to reaching a bipartisan agreement on a policing reform bill.

Scott told CNN on Tuesday after the meeting that he felt the Floyd family was very receptive to all the parts of the bill they discussed.

“I was pleasantly surprised and encouraged by their thoughts,” Scott said, adding, “I wish I was negotiating with them.”

Go There: CNN's Omar Jimenez answers your questions from Minneapolis on the anniversary of Floyd's death

One year ago today, George Floyd was killed by a police officer in Minneapolis. His death sparked global protests against police brutality.

Today, as his family continues to mourn his death, activists and communities around the country march and pay tribute to the man who became a symbol for racial justice.

CNN’s Omar Jimenez was live from Minneapolis and answered your questions.

Watch:

08:46

CNN Political Briefing podcast details the work still ahead one year after Floyd's killing

Today marks the one-year anniversary of the murder of George Floyd. 

In today’s episode of CNN Political Briefing podcast, CNN Correspondent Omar Jimenez walks us through how the communities in Minnesota — and the country at large — are still grappling with the grief, the necessary changes to come, and what change community leaders are hoping for when it comes to reform.  

You can listen here.

Vice President Harris urges Congress to "move swiftly" on police reform legislation

Vice President Kamala Harris urged Congress to “act with a sense of urgency” to pass police reform legislation in a statement released today.

Like President Biden, she said more needs to be done to address racial injustice. Earlier this afternoon, Harris and Biden met with the family of George Floyd on the anniversary of his death to discuss police reform.

“After Mr. Floyd was murdered, Senator Cory Booker, Representative Karen Bass, and I introduced the Justice in Policing Act to hold law enforcement accountable and build trust between law enforcement and the communities it serves. Congress must move swiftly and act with a sense of urgency. Passing legislation will not bring back those lives lost, but it will represent much needed progress,” she wrote.

Harris said that the video of Floyd’s death one year ago “revealed to the country what Black Americans have known to be true for generations.”

“The verdict finding Derek Chauvin guilty of murder provided some measure of justice. But one verdict does not address the persistent issue of police misconduct and use of excessive force. It does not take away the Floyd family’s pain, nor the pain of all those families who have grieved the untimely loss of a loved one,” Harris wrote. 

Biden says he hopes to "quickly" sign action on police reform following meeting with Floyd family

President Biden released a statement after his Oval Office meeting with George Floyd’s family, saying the family has shown “extraordinary courage” over this past year. 

“Although it has been one year since their beloved brother and father was murdered, for the family – for any family experiencing a profound loss – the first year can still feel like they got the news a few seconds ago. And they’ve had to relive that pain and grief each and every time those horrific 9 minutes and 29 seconds have been replayed,” Biden wrote.

Biden also reiterated his call for further action on police reform and said he hopes he can sign police reform legislation shortly. 

“The negotiations on the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act in Congress are ongoing. I have strongly supported the legislation that passed the House, and I appreciate the good-faith efforts from Democrats and Republicans to pass a meaningful bill out of the Senate. It’s my hope they will get a bill to my desk quickly,” he wrote.

Biden said the conviction of former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin was an important step forward, but “our progress can’t stop there.”

The President said in order to deliver real change, there needs to be accountability when officers “violate their oath, saying, “we can and must have both accountability and trust and in our justice system.”

Nevada governor signs two police reform bills on anniversary of George Floyd's death

Two police reform bills that passed the Nevada Legislature unanimously were signed by Gov. Steve Sisolak on the anniversary of the murder of George Floyd, who was killed by a Minneapolis Police officer.

“Nevadans deserve to feel safe in their own homes and communities and it’s critical that they trust that those charged with protecting them do so with integrity,” Sisolak said in a written statement Tuesday.

Senate Bill 50 requires law enforcement to provide an extensive explanation for why there is no alternative to a no-knock warrant before a judge can approve one. Assembly Bill 58 gives the state attorney general the ability the investigate whether a department is denying people’s civil rights.

“Son, this is for you,” said Attorney General Aaron Ford – who is Black – at a news conference on the new laws Tuesday. Wiping away tears, Ford added, “The level of perpetual anxiety we have to live with is just an unfair burden, and we have to stop it.”

Floyd's family is urging Congress to pass a policing reform bill. Here's what is in the legislation. 

Benjamin Crump, front center, along with Gianna Floyd, daughter of George Floyd, and her mother Roxie Washington, and others talk with reporters after meeting with President Joe Biden at the White House, Tuesday, May 25.

Benjamin Crump, the attorney of George Floyd’s family, said that the family met with President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris for “over an hour” today and discussed pressing forward with police reform legislation named in Floyd’s honor. 

“He [Biden] wanted to check on them, on today of all days, to see how they were doing to reiterate that they are still doing everything to make sure that his legacy is respected and that involves us going to meet with senators in just a few moments to continue to press forward for the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act that he says he’s ready to sign any day,” Crump said from outside of the White House. “He said that he doesn’t want to sign a bill that doesn’t have substance and meaning, so he is going to be patient to make sure it’s the right bill, not a rushed bill.”

The House of Representatives in March approved the legislation, but the bill remains stalled in the Senate. A group of bipartisan lawmakers are still working to reach a compromise in the chamber as several sticking points remain, including the issue of qualified immunity for police.

Here’s what is included in the bill passed in the House earlier this year:

  • The legislation would set up a national registry of police misconduct to stop officers from evading consequences for their actions by moving to another jurisdiction.
  • It would ban racial and religious profiling by law enforcement at the federal, state and local levels.
  • It would overhaul qualified immunity, a controversial federal doctrine that protects officers accused of violating the Constitution while on duty and that critics say shields law enforcement from accountability.
  • According to a fact sheet on the legislation, the measure would allow “individuals to recover damages in civil court when law enforcement officers violate their constitutional rights by eliminating qualified immunity for law enforcement.” 
  • The fact sheet also states that the legislation would “save lives by banning chokeholds and no-knock warrants” and would mandate “deadly force be used only as a last resort.”

Biden had set a goal of today — the anniversary of Floyd’s death — to pass police reform legislation during his joint address to Congress in April, though the White House backed off that deadline last week.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Biden wants to give the negotiators on the Hill space to negotiate, and that he has been speaking with police reform advocates throughout these negotiations. She also would not put a new timeline on when the President expects to sign a police reform bill into law, but said Biden wants to sign the bill into law “as soon as possible.”

Crump said that in today’s White House meeting, the Floyd family also “encouraged” Biden to continue to meet with the civil rights leaders and advocacy groups that have “been working on this issue for decades.”

CNN’s Clare Foran and Jason Hoffman contributed reporting to this post.

If the US protects the bald eagle, it can make laws "to protect people of color," Floyd's brother says

Philonise Floyd talks to reporters alongside other family members after meeting with President Joe Biden at the White House on May 25.

Philonise Floyd, George Floyd’s brother, said he hopes more on police reform, specifically the proposed George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, is signed into law.

“If you can make federal laws to protect the bird, which is the bald eagle, you can make federal laws to protect people of color,” he said on Tuesday.

Floyd said he met with President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris today in “remembrance of what happened to my brother” on the one year anniversary of his killing in Minneapolis.

“They always speak from the heart,” Floyd said of the President and vice president. “And it’s a pleasure just to be able to have the chance to meet with them when he we have that opportunity.”

“We’re just thankful for what’s going on and we just want this George Floyd Policing Act to be passed in the future,” he added.

Police reform legislation can help save others, George Floyd's cousin says

One year after George Floyd’s death, his cousin, Tera Brown, said that his family is working to build on his legacy. 

“As much as, you know, it’s a loss for us, we do … we want to celebrate the life that he lived and focus on just making sure that … we build on the legacy that we want to honor him with,” said Brown, director of the George Floyd Foundation. 

Brown said she’s always considered herself a caretaker of the family, and she wants police reform legislation to move forward to help others. She added that she knows this type of legislation takes time, but she believes it’ll happen.  

“I just have so much guilt about, really, just not being there or not being able to save him. And so, that is why it’s just so important to me that — we can’t get him back, we know we’ll never get him back — but we can do things as far as policy and legislation and getting those changes that will save lives, save the lives of others,” she said. 

Floyd’s 7-year-old daughter, Gianna, who said her “daddy changed the world,” is doing well and truly believes that statement, Brown said. The family tries to “protect her as much as we can,” Brown added.  

Floyd's death sparked a worldwide movement, Minnesota's attorney general says

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison remembered George Floyd today, saying in a statement that his death sparked a call to action among people who didn’t even know him because “they knew in their bones that what they were seeing was wrong.”

“Floyd’s death one year ago today sparked a worldwide movement because it didn’t happen in the flash of an instant: it took place over nine and a half excruciating minutes before people armed only with cell phones, who made sure it played out in front of the world,” Ellison said in the statement.

He went on to say that after years of African American communities being gaslit by people in authority being told “state-sanctioned violence in their communities is their fault and that they are the criminals,” they and everyone in the world who watched Floyd’s death on video “believed their eyes.”

“We can break this cycle. The moment for making meaningful change is now,” Ellison said.

George Floyd's family is meeting with Biden and Harris now at the White House

Gianna Floyd, George Floyd's daughter, arrives to the White House on May 25th,  in Washington, DC. George Floyd’s family are having a meeting with U.S. President Joe Biden at the White House to mark the first anniversary of his death.

President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris are meeting with the family of George Floyd exactly one year after he was killed by a Minneapolis police officer, sparking nationwide protests against racism and police brutality.

The meeting today comes as the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act — legislation that would set up a national registry of police misconduct, ban racial and religious profiling by law enforcement and overhaul qualified immunity for police officers — remains stalled in the Senate.

Biden had set an initial goal of having the legislation passed by today, but the White House backed off that deadline to allow negotiations to continue in Congress.

The family was on Capitol Hill this morning, where they met with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Rep. Karen Bass, the lead House negotiator of the police reform bill passed by the House under Floyd’s name.

Biden wanted his meeting with Floyd’s family today to be private, according to White House press secretary Jen Psaki, “in order to have a real conversation and preserve that with the family.”

Minnesota governor remembers George Floyd on anniversary of his death

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz released a statement honoring George Floyd on the anniversary of his death.

“In the days following his murder, Minnesotans raised their voices and called for real, meaningful change to prevent this from ever happening again. Those calls for action spread across the world as his memory sparked a global movement. George Floyd didn’t ask to be an international symbol of the pain that Black Americans have faced for generations, and yet, in the words of his daughter, he changed the world,” Walz said.

The governor said the state must honor Floyd’s memory “by ensuring all people—particularly in our communities of color—are respected and protected by law enforcement.”

White House defends Biden's efforts on policing reform ahead of President's meeting with Floyd family 

White House press secretary Jen Psaki responded to criticism that President Biden is not doing enough to help push a police reform bill through Congress, saying Tuesday that Biden wanted to give the negotiators on the Hill space to negotiate, and that he has been speaking with police reform advocates throughout these negotiations.

She also would not put a new timeline on when the President expects to sign a police reform bill into law, but said Biden wants to sign the bill into law “as soon as possible.”

“We have been closely engaged with the negotiators and a range of parties on the Hill. We have also been respecting the space needed for the negotiators to have these discussions about where they can find common ground and where they can find agreement,” Psaki said when asked what the President has been doing to try and push police reform closer to the finish line after his original deadline came and went.

Biden had set a goal of today — the anniversary of George Floyd’s death — to pass police reform legislation during his joint address to Congress in April, though the White House backed off that deadline last week.

“So we’ve been closely engaged, the President himself called Sen. [Cory] Booker to get an update last Friday, expect to continue to get updates over the coming days. And we have also made it imperative and made it a priority to leave space for the negotiators to have these discussions,” she added.

She also responded to criticisms from police reform advocates who say Biden has not done enough to get this legislation passed. 

“Look, I think we may just have a disagreement in terms of what the right strategic approaches to these negotiations moving forward and getting to the final outcome which we all want to see, which is a bill that the President can sign into law,” she said.

Asked why the President wasn’t using his bully pulpit to make a stronger public call for police reform on the anniversary of Floyd’s death, Psaki said a written statement in the President’s name would be coming out today.

“He used the opportunity of his joint session address, which is the highest profile moment any President of the United States has in their first year of office to call for forward movements on police reform to call for the George Floyd Justice in Police Act to pass and he’s meeting with the family,” Psaki said.

The press secretary would not say whether the President would sign legislation that includes a compromise proposed by GOP Sen. Tim Scott on qualified immunity that allows individuals to sue police departments but not individual police officers, saying the President wants to wait to see what negotiations ultimately bring.

“He remains closely engaged and closely in touch with the negotiators about what is most constructive and what role he can play and we can play to leave the space for them to negotiate and to move toward a place where you can sign the bill into law,” she said.

Shortly after Psaki was asked about Biden doing more to publicly call for police reform, a tweet from Biden’s account said, “We face an inflection point. We have to act.” Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris are meeting privately with the Floyd family today at the White House.

See Biden’s tweet:

Minnesota will observe a moment of silence for 9 minutes and 29 seconds today

There will be a 9-minute-and-29-second moment of silence across Minnesota today at 2 p.m. ET (or 1 p.m. local time), to honor the George Floyd, Gov. Tim Walz announced.

Former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin — who last month was convicted of murder in Floyd’s death — knelt on Floyd’s neck for 9 minutes and 29 seconds.

Canada's Trudeau says he'll work "to take real action to fight systemic racism" as country remembers Floyd

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Tuesday that he will work “to take real action to fight systemic racism” and recognized the many Canadians and those around the world who have called for change in the wake of George Floyd’s death. 

“We all remember the horrible images of that murder that scandalized and changed the world,” Trudeau said in French. CNN translated the remark.

“It was a reminder that there are still too many people living with anti-black racism and injustice including here in Canada. Last summer, Canadians and especially young people marched to demand change; from economic empowerment through the black entrepreneurship program to proposing to remove ineffective mandatory minimums from the Criminal Code, to historic investments in community organizations our government is working with black communities across the country to make sure nobody is left behind. We will continue to take real action to fight systemic racism and create more opportunities for black Canadians and for everyone,” Trudeau said. These remarks were in English. 

Trudeau, along with a few Cabinet members, attended an anti-racism rally in Ottawa shortly after Floyd’s death last year. 

Floyd family meets with House Speaker Pelosi ahead of White House visit 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi just met with members of George Floyd’s family on Capitol Hill.

According to a senior Democratic staffer, the Floyd family was to meet with Pelosi, Rep. Karen Bass and lawmakers today.

Bass is the lead House negotiator in the police reform bill that passed the House under Floyd’s name. The legislation remains stalled in the Senate.

“They’ve been working tremendously to help push the issue of getting this law passed. I thank you all so much. Our families thank you that you are all here today,” George Floyd’s brother, Philonise Floyd, told reporters.

The family will meet privately with President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris at the White House this afternoon.

CNN’s Ryan Nobles contributed reporting to this post.

Schumer calls on Congress to continue "important work" of bipartisan policing bill on Floyd anniversary

Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said on Tuesday that it is “particularly poignant and appropriate” that the Senate will confirm Kristen Clarke to lead the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division on the anniversary of George Floyd’s murder – in addition to Congress’ continued efforts to pass strong bipartisan policing reform legislation.

He said the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division is “often the tip of the spear conducting investigations of police departments with patterns or practices of constitutional violations”.. “So, in a way, as we continue to pursue strong policing reform legislation, it is appropriate that we confirm Kristen Clarke… where she can continue the fight against bigotry.”

He noted how Democratic Rep. Karen Bass of California, Democratic Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey and Republican Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina have been working behind the scenes to craft a bipartisan policing bill and “that important work must continue as we strive to ensure George Floyd’s tragic death will not be in vain.”

Some more background: The House of Representatives in March approved legislation aimed at preventing police misconduct that Democrats named in honor of Floyd, but the legislation has remained stalled in the Senate. A group of bipartisan lawmakers is currently working to reach an agreement. One of the sticking points is qualified immunity, which shields police officers from civil lawsuits.

Senate Judiciary Chair Dick Durbin said today that the qualified immunity issue “isn’t resolved” in ongoing negotiations over the legislation.

“The negotiations are still underway. They are positive. There are differences,” Durbin told CNN when asked about qualified immunity.

President Biden had originally set today — the anniversary of Floyd’s death — as the deadline to pass police reform legislation. Press secretary Jen Psaki said Friday that the White House has “confidence in the negotiators,” but did not offer a concrete timeline for when Biden wants a bill on his desk, saying only that he’d like it “as quickly as possible.”

Floyd family uses some settlement money to offer grants for Minneapolis community

George Floyd’s family announced they are using $500,000 of their $27 million settlement with the city of Minneapolis to create The George Floyd Community Benevolence Fund.

The fund will offer grants to organizations and businesses that serve the community at 38th & Chicago in Minneapolis. The intersection of 38th Street and Chicago Avenue is where Floyd died one year ago.

“As we mark the one-year anniversary of George Floyd’s horrific death, the family feels deeply that something positive should come from the pain and injustice he suffered. The George Floyd Community Benevolence Fund will be an instrumental, long-term partner to the Black-owned businesses in the neighborhood where he died, where we all have seen the continued negative impact of systemic racism,” family attorney Ben Crump said in a statement.

How communities across the country are remembering George Floyd today

It hast’s been a year since George Floyd was killed by a former Minneapolis police officer, and events are planned across the country to honor Floyd and remember his life.

Here’s a look at where some of the tributes, events and marches are happening:

  • In Washington, DC: Floyd’s sister Bridgett Floyd, his daughter Gianna Floyd and Gianna’s mother, Roxie Washington, will visit the White House at the invitation of President Joe Biden. The family meeting will be private so Biden can have a “real conversation and preserve that with the family,” press secretary Jen Psaki said.
  • In Minneapolis: Other members of Floyd’s family are expected to attend memorial events in Minneapolis on Tuesday, according to a family spokesman. One of those events is a “Celebration of Life” which includes a day of games, food, inflatable attractions for youth and special performances by Grammy Award-winning artists and local talent.
  • In Dallas: Organizers in Dallas are hosting a solidarity march and rally on Tuesday.
  • Online: The California-based Pacific Symphony is streaming a free concert in honor of Floyd.
  • On television: BET will also pay homage to Floyd, airing special programming that kicks off Tuesday with “Bars and Ballads for George Floyd,” featuring Jon Batiste, Nas, former UN Ambassador Andrew Young, singer and activist Anthony Hamilton and Color of Change President Rashad Robinson.

Here's where things stand in the cases against the former officers charged in Floyd's death

It’s been a year since former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin knelt to George Floyd’s neck for more than 9 minutes as three other officers stood on the scene.

Chauvin was convicted of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter last month, and the other officers have yet to stand trial.

Here’s what we know about the four former officers and where their cases stand:

  • Chauvin will be sentenced next month: Chauvin will be sentenced at 2:30 p.m. ET June 25, according to an updated entry on the court docket. The court had previously set Chauvin’s sentencing hearing for June 16, and the docket did not indicate a reason for the change.
  • More grand jury charges: After Chauvin was convicted on the state charges in Floyd’s death, a federal grand jury indicted all four former Minneapolis police officers in connection with Floyd’s death, alleging the officers violated Floyd’s constitutional rights, according to court documents filed in federal court in Minnesota.
  • Another state trial in 2022: Tou Thao, Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Kueng are accused of aiding and abetting the murder of Floyd. Their trial has been postponed until March 7, 2022, so that the federal trial on civil rights charges can take place first, Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill announced this month. The three — who have pleaded not guilty — had been set to stand trial this August.

Pelosi expected to meet with Floyd family today

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on May 20.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will meet with members of George Floyd’s family today in Washington on the anniversary of his death.

According to a senior Democratic staffer, the Floyd family will have a morning meeting with Pelosi, Rep. Karen Bass and others in the US Capitol.

Bass is the lead House negotiator in the police reform bill that passed the House under Floyd’s name.

The bill is currently being negotiated in the Senate.

Biden's meeting with the Floyd family will be private

President Biden will meet with the late George Floyd’s family in a private meeting today to mark the anniversary of his death, White House press secretary Jen Psaki previewed at Monday’s briefing.

Psaki said the administration will put out a statement marking the day that, “certainly impacted” the President personally and “impacted millions of Americans.”

“He wanted this meeting to be private in order to have a real conversation and preserve that with the family. He has a genuine relationship with them, and the courage and grace of this family and especially his daughter Gianna Floyd, has really stuck with the President, as you have seen him talk about Kelly and others, many times over the past several months,” Psaki said. “So, he’s eager to listen to their perspectives and hear what they have to say.”

The attendee list, according to Psaki, includes Gianna Floyd, Roxie Washington (Gianna’s mother), Bridgett Floyd (Floyd’s sister), Philonise Floyd (Floyd’s brother), Keeta Floyd (Brother’s wife), Terrence Floyd (Floyd’s brother) and Brandon Williams (Floyd’s nephew). 

What to know about the police reform bill named in Floyd's honor — and where things stand Congress 

The House of Representatives in March approved legislation aimed at preventing police misconduct that Democrats named in honor of George Floyd, whose death in police custody sparked nationwide calls to overhaul policing and address racial injustice.

House Democrats originally introduced and passed the bill — titled the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act — in 2020 in the wake of Floyd’s death, but it never passed in the Senate, which was under Republican control at the time. 

The bill now has another opportunity in the Democratic-controlled Senate, which has a 50-50 partisan split with Vice President Kamala Harris acting as the tie breaker, and a group of bipartisan lawmakers are working to reach a compromise in the chamber.

Here’s what is included in the bill passed in the House earlier this year:

  • The legislation would set up a national registry of police misconduct to stop officers from evading consequences for their actions by moving to another jurisdiction.
  • It would ban racial and religious profiling by law enforcement at the federal, state and local levels.
  • It would overhaul qualified immunity, a legal doctrine that critics say shields law enforcement from accountability.
  • According to a fact sheet on the legislation, the measure would allow “individuals to recover damages in civil court when law enforcement officers violate their constitutional rights by eliminating qualified immunity for law enforcement.” 
  • The fact sheet also states that the legislation would “save lives by banning chokeholds and no-knock warrants” and would mandate “deadly force be used only as a last resort.”

President Biden had called for a police reform bill to be passed and on his desk by today — the anniversary of Floyd’s death — but negotiators have long said they want a substantive bill, not a rushed bill and that they will not be adhering to any self-declared timeline.

The three lead negotiators in the bipartisan effort to overhaul policing — Democratic Rep. Karen Bass of California, Democratic Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey and Republican Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina — issued a joint statement yesterday saying they’re still “working through our differences on key issues” but are continuing to make progress.

“One year ago, George Floyd’s murder awakened millions of people around the world who had never before witnessed the deadly consequences of the failures in our policing system. This anniversary serves as a painful reminder of why we must make meaningful change. While we are still working through our differences on key issues, we continue to make progress toward a compromise and remain optimistic about the prospects of achieving that goal,” they said in the statement.

Booker told CNN’s Dana Bash Sunday that Democrats and Republicans are still far apart in their views on how to deal with qualified immunity.

CNN’s Jessica Dean contributed reporting to this post.

Biden will host George Floyd's family at the White House today

President Joe Biden speaks from Cross- Hall of the White House on May 20 in Washington, DC.

President Biden will host the family of George Floyd at the White House today to mark the one-year anniversary of his death at the hands of police, a White House official confirmed to CNN.

The White House visit comes as lawmakers are likely to miss the President’s initial May 25 deadline for passing a bipartisan police reform bill. Press secretary Jen Psaki said Friday that the White House has “confidence in the negotiators,” but did not offer a concrete timeline for when Biden wants a bill on his desk, saying only that he’d like it “as quickly as possible.”

Biden first met with the Floyd family in June 2020 when he traveled to Houston to offer condolences ahead of George Floyd’s funeral. The President has spoken to members of the family on a few occasions over the past year, including a conversation last month with George Floyd’s brother, Philonise Floyd, after a jury convicted former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin in the killing.

Psaki had said this week that the White House will commemorate the anniversary of Floyd’s death, telling reporters that “it was a moment that impacted millions of Americans and certainly the President on a personal level.”

George Floyd's brother reflects on year since Floyd's death: Progress is slowly being made

George Floyd’s brother, Philonise Floyd, said that he thinks “things have changed” one year since Floyd’s death. 

“I think it’s moving slowly, but it’s making progress. I just want everything to be better in life, because I don’t want to see people dying the same way my brother has passed,” Philonise Floyd said on CNN’s “New Day.” 

Floyd said he thinks about his brother George all the time, and his death has been “just devastating” for the family. Today, he is also thinking about all the activists and people around the world who “stepped out and put their lives on the line during this pandemic” to speak out for his brother, he said. 

Philonise Floyd said that Congress passing police reform legislation would be “one of the best things that you can pass across America.”

“When you see a police officer, you see somebody that you respect, somebody that’s out there serving America. And they [are] supposed to make sure that you are OK. But when an officer takes someone else’s life, to me, it’s not a mistake, because a mistake can be erased. You can’t get that person’s life back,” he said. 

The Floyd family’s lawyer, Benjamin Crump, said that their message is “let’s don’t squander this moment.” 

“We want to make sure that we do something, that we just don’t talk the talk. America is finally having this conversation about racial reckoning, but that’s just talk if we don’t act. Now is the time to act. Let’s do it in the name of George Floyd and all the others that have been taken from us unjustly by the very people who are supposed to protect and serve us,” Crump said. 

Watch:

GO DEEPER

George Floyd's death was a year ago and traumatizing details are everywhere. Here's how to cope
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GO DEEPER

George Floyd's death was a year ago and traumatizing details are everywhere. Here's how to cope
Lawmakers see promise in police reform negotiations as Biden plans meeting with George Floyd's family
Texas officials move forward on requesting posthumous pardon for George Floyd
'This gives us hope.' George Floyd's family praises federal indictment of 4 former police officers
Why sweeping police reform over the last year has largely been elusive