June 15 Black Lives Matter protests

By Meg Wagner, Mike Hayes, Helen Regan and Steve George, CNN

Updated 12:41 a.m. ET, June 16, 2020
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12:20 p.m. ET, June 15, 2020

Rayshard Brooks' family calls for "a conviction" and "drastic change" to Atlanta police

WGCL
WGCL

Rayshard Brooks' family member, Tiara Brooks, said, "The trust that we have with the police force is broken."

"The only way to heal some of these wounds is through a conviction and a drastic change with the police department," she said.

She asked, "How many more protests will it take to ensure that the next victim isn't your cousin, your brother, your uncle, your nephew, your friend or your companion so that we can finally end the suffering of police excessive force?"

"We are tired. Guys, we're tired, and we're frustrated." 

WATCH:

12:09 p.m. ET, June 15, 2020

Rayshard Brooks' niece: "He had the brightest smile and the biggest heart"

WGCL
WGCL

Rayshard Brooks niece said her family lost "a girl dad" and "a loving husband" when he was killed on Friday.

"He had the brightest smile and the biggest heart," she said at a news conference. "On June 12, one of our biggest fears became our reality."

She said she and her uncle are the same age — 27.

"No one walking this green earth expects to be shot and killed like trash in the street for falling asleep in the drive-thru."

WATCH:

11:52 a.m. ET, June 15, 2020

NOW: Family of Rayshard Brooks speaks

Rayshard Brooks' family speaks during a press conference on June 15.
Rayshard Brooks' family speaks during a press conference on June 15. WGCL

Relatives of Rayshard Brooks, who was shot and killed by police in Atlanta on Friday, are speaking at a news conference.

Within 48 hours of the incident, the Atlanta police officer who shot Brooks was terminated and the city's police chief stepped down. Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has said she doesn't believe the killing was a justified use of force, and Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard says the officer who shot Brooks could face charges

Brooks' wife, Tomika Miller, in an interview that aired earlier today, said she wants the officers at the scene to go to jail.

"Rayshard Brooks is everybody. Just like George is everybody. We are all the people, we are all God's children," Brooks' wife, Tomika Miller, told "CBS This Morning."
10:32 a.m. ET, June 15, 2020

Stacey Abrams on Rayshard Brooks' death: "It was murder"

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

Stacey Abrams speaks during the Martin & Coretta S. King Unity Breakfast on March 1 in Selma, Alabama.
Stacey Abrams speaks during the Martin & Coretta S. King Unity Breakfast on March 1 in Selma, Alabama. Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Former Georgia gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams says the death of Rayshard Brooks — a 27-year-old black man who was shot twice in the back by police in Atlanta — was murder.

“The decision to shoot him in the back was one made out of maybe impatience or frustration or panic, but it was not one that justifies deadly force. It was murder.”

The police officers confronted Brooks at a Wendy’s parking lot. Multiple videos from police, restaurant and witnesses showed the confrontation are being used to piece together the last minutes of Brooks' life.

Abrams said it’s clear the officers knew Brooks’ wasn’t a threat.

“This is a man who had been frisked, so they knew he did not possess a deadly weapon. They knew that he was impaired because he had parked in that driveway. And they knew, when he ran away, that he did not pose a danger that was a deadly force incentive.”

“At no point did he present a danger that warranted his death,” she added.

Attempts to justify Brooks’ killing dehumanize him, Abrams said.

“Every moment of justification is a moment of dehumanization. That's the problem. Let's not get distracted. The distraction that happens is that we try to find reasons that murder is acceptable when a black man or a black woman is the victim and that should not happen," she said.

She disagreed with the calls to defund the police and instead agreed with “reallocating resources for the public good.”

10:10 a.m. ET, June 15, 2020

Philadelphia mayor calls for investigation into city's response to protests

From CNN's Artemis Moshtaghian

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney announced plans to conduct an investigation of the city’s response to recent protests, most prominently the Philadelphia Police Department’s use of force, according to a statement from the mayor's office.

The Mayor and Police Commissioner have requested services for the investigation to be led by an independent consultant and the scope of the investigation is currently being drafted.

One area that the Mayor and Police Commissioner have requested review of is the use-of-force incidents from internal or investigative reports and data from May 29 through June 15, 2020, or later, regarding interactions with persons engaging in protest, the statement reads. 

9:53 a.m. ET, June 15, 2020

Supreme Court declines to take up cases about law enforcement

From CNN's Ariane de Vogue

Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The Supreme Court declined on Monday to take up several cases regarding when law enforcement and other public officials can be sued for violating a citizen’s civil rights. 

The court’s decision comes after protesters across the country have been reacting to the death of an unarmed black man, George Floyd, at the hands of a police officer in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  

In recent years, legal scholars, judges and justices on all sides of the ideological spectrum have criticized the legal doctrine known as “qualified immunity,” arguing that it is not grounded in the proper legal authorities and it too often shields officials from accountability. 

 

10:30 a.m. ET, June 15, 2020

Here's what know about the Rayshard Brooks killing

From CNN's AJ Willingham

People build a memorial at a Wendy's in Atlanta on Sunday, where Rayshard Brooks was shot and killed during a confrontation with police on June 12.
People build a memorial at a Wendy's in Atlanta on Sunday, where Rayshard Brooks was shot and killed during a confrontation with police on June 12. Curtis Compton/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP

Another weekend of anti-racist and Black Lives Matter protests was punctuated by another police shooting of a black man.

Here's what we know about the incident:

8:35 a.m. ET, June 15, 2020

Trump expected to sign policing executive order tomorrow, aide says

From CNN's Joe Johns

President Donald Trump walks on the South Lawn of the White House on June 14 in Washington.
President Donald Trump walks on the South Lawn of the White House on June 14 in Washington. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

President’s Trump will likely sign an executive order on policing tomorrow, Ja’Ron Smith, deputy assistant to the President, told reporters on the White House driveway this morning.

Smith also said the intention is to have members of families of police violence victims attend the signing, though Smith said he did not want to get “ahead” of the President on invitees who may or may not attend. 

8:17 a.m. ET, June 15, 2020

Black Lives Matter banner displayed at Seoul's US embassy

Police officers stand outside the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, South Korea on June 14.
Police officers stand outside the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, South Korea on June 14. Lee Jin-man/AP

A Black Lives Matter banner was displayed outside the US embassy in Seoul, South Korea.

"The U.S. Embassy stands in solidarity with fellow Americans grieving and peacefully protesting to demand positive change," a spokesperson for the embassy said in a tweet.

"Our #BlackLivesMatter banner shows our support for the fight against racial injustice and police brutality as we strive to be a more inclusive & just society."

Harry Harris, the US ambassador to South Korea, retweeted the post.

"I believe in what President JFK said on June 10, 1963 at American University: 'If we cannot now end our differences, at least we can help make the world safe for diversity.' USA is a free & diverse nation...from that diversity we gain our strength," Harris wrote.