June 13 Black Lives Matter protests

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2:47 p.m. ET, June 13, 2020

Officials identify man fatally shot by police officer in Atlanta fast food drive-thru 

From CNN’s Artemis Moshtaghian, Alex Meideros and Jay Croft

WSB
WSB

An Atlanta police officer shot and killed a man at a Wendy's drive-thru Friday night after he resisted arrest and struggled for an officer's Taser, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation said in a statement.

The GBI identified the slain man as Rayshard Brooks, 27, of Atlanta, who was African American.

Witnesses provided video to investigators, the GBI said on Twitter.

"The GBI is aware that there is video posted on social media captured by witnesses in this incident. We are reviewing the video & the early investigative information in this case. We'll provide an update as soon as we can," the tweet said.

What happened, according to officials: On Friday, officers responded to a call at 10:33 p.m. about a man sleeping in a parked vehicle in the drive-thru, causing other customers to drive around it, the GBI said in a statement.

Police gave Brooks a field sobriety test, which he failed, the GBI said. He resisted arrest and struggled with officers, the GBI said.

An officer drew his Taser and, witnesses said, the man grabbed it, the statement said. An officer then shot him.

Brooks was taken to a hospital, where he died, the statement said.

One officer was treated for an injury and released, the GBI said.

CNN has reached out to the APD, GBI and the mayor's office but they have not responded.

The GBI is investigating at the request of the APD, the statement said. Once completed, the case will be turned over to prosecutors for review.

Some background: Brooks' killing comes amid global protests and discussion of racism and police use of force following the death of George Floyd last month in custody in Minneapolis. Atlanta has seen frequent protests, including some that turned violent.

Six Atlanta Police Department officers were facing charges of using excessive force during one, Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard announced June 2. Two of the officers were fired by Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms.

Watch CNN's latest reporting on the Atlanta police shooting:

1:55 p.m. ET, June 13, 2020

Local governments must pass redesigned police reform plans into law by April 1, NY governor says

From CNN's Kristina Sgueglia

Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a news conference on June 12 in New York.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a news conference on June 12 in New York. Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that he will require counties and cities to go through a process of redesigning their police force and passing it into law by April 1.

If the process is not undertaken, they will not receive state funding, Cuomo said.

Cuomo said he is calling on “county by county, city by city” to sort over the next 9 months what policing looks like in 2020.

“At the table, activists stake holders police government officials you design your police force and you do it now," he said at his daily news briefing on Saturday.

“If you don’t do it, local government, you won’t get any state funding, period," he added.

The state will not tell jurisdictions what to do, but will require them to go through the process and pass a law, he said.

“Demonstration, legislation, reconciliation,” is the “formula” for change, Cuomo said.

“Now is the time for every community to put pen to paper and enact systemic reform," he added.

Cuomo said there will be no state governmental office or commissioner oversight of the police force redesign process, adding the only requirement is that local governments pass the law.

The state will not second guess the local law, Cuomo said, adding that state laws stay in effect. The state troopers are going through their own process, Cuomo said. “That we will do ourselves,” he said.

The governor also touted the package of sweeping police reform bills he signed this week. 

“We heard you…we agree with you protesters.. now tell us what the police force should look like," he said.

“It takes 9 months to give birth, and we’re going to birth a new vision for a police force, community by community because there is no one size fits all, it’s what that community wants," Cuomo added.

11:48 a.m. ET, June 13, 2020

Buffalo legislature calls for investigation into firing of officer who intervened when suspect was put in a chokehold

From CNN's Sheena Jones

The Buffalo Common Council, the city government's legislative branch, has submitted a resolution to the New York Attorney General’s office to open an investigation into the firing of police officer, Cariol Horne, after she intervened during the chokehold of a suspect, the council tells CNN.

In November of 2006, Horne, a black officer, says she intervened as another officer, a white man, put a suspect in a chokehold, the resolution says.

Horne was later fired for intervening and did not qualify for her pension as a result.

“So if you cross that thin blue line, then you get ostracized and treated really badly, I didn’t want that to happen to anyone else,” said Horne. “So, I lost my pension, Neal Mack didn’t lose his life, so Neal Mack still lives to this day because I did intervene,” Horne told CNN affiliate WIVB.

The resolution calls on the Buffalo Police Department to enforce and train officers on the “Duty to intervene” policy within the next 30 days and to check for any attendance discrepancies into the needed days for her to receive her pension. 

The “Duty to intervene” policy calls for officers to protect citizens from unnecessary or excessive use of force, the resolution says. 

CNN has attempted to reach Horne and the Buffalo Police Department for additional comments. The New York Attorney General’s office tells CNN they will not be commenting on this matter at this time. 

11:52 a.m. ET, June 13, 2020

Trump thanks National Guard for their contribution in ensuring "constitutional rule of law” on US streets

President Donald Trump speaks to cadets at the United States Military Academy commencement ceremony on June 13 in West Point, New York.
President Donald Trump speaks to cadets at the United States Military Academy commencement ceremony on June 13 in West Point, New York. Alex Brandon/AP

Speaking before graduating cadets at the US Military Academy at West Point, President Trump thanked the National Guard for their contribution to “ensuring peace, safety and the constitutional rule of law on our streets.”

Trump also praised the “durability” of American institutions “against the passions and prejudices of the moment.”

“When times are turbulent, when the road is rough, what matters most is that which is permanent, timeless, enduring, and eternal,” he said.

Aside from thanking the National Guard for their role in ensuring “safety," Trump did not directly address the protests that have been held across the country following the death of George Floyd.

Some background: As of June 12, almost 19,000 members of the National Guard are still activated to help with social unrest across the country.

The role of the National Guard regarding the Washington, DC, protests has come under scrutiny and is under review by the Department of Defense.

The President confirmed during Thursday remarks that the White House is finalizing an executive order on policing standards in the wake of national outcry over George Floyd's death at the hands of police officers in Minnesota.

Trump said the order "will encourage police departments nationwide to meet the most current, professional standards for the use of force, including tactics for de-escalation."

5:00 p.m. ET, June 13, 2020

Scuffles break out between police and far-right protesters in central London

From CNN's Simon Cullen, Mick Krever and Luke Wolagiewicz

Police officers scuffle with members of far-right groups protesting in central London on Saturday, June 13.
Police officers scuffle with members of far-right groups protesting in central London on Saturday, June 13. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Intermittent violent scuffles have broken out between police and far-right protesters in central London.

Video from the scene shows a small number of protesters throwing objects at a line of police, while some officers respond with their batons.

Far-right groups are staging a counter-protest to the Black Lives Matter demonstrations and to "protect" statues around Parliament Square, including that of wartime prime minister Winston Churchill.

Videos captured by CNN’s Chris Jackson also showed the far-right protesters gathering by the boarded up Churchill statue.

Authorities in the UK capital have urged people to stay away from Saturday’s protest activity, given the high likelihood of violence.

UK Home Secretary Priti Patel described the behavior as “thoroughly unacceptable thuggery”.

 “Any perpetrators of violence or vandalism should expect to face the full force of the law. Violence towards our police officers will not be tolerated. Coronavirus remains a threat to us all. Go home to stop the spread of this virus & save lives,” she said.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan also urged residents earlier to stay away from protests this weekend amid a “high” risk of violence in the city.

“I’d like to make a direct appeal to Londoners to urge you not to take to the streets to protest over the coming few days,” Khan said in a video posted on social media.

“I stand with the millions of around the world that say that Black Lives Matter,” he said, adding that the majority of protesters are peaceful.

“However, I’m extremely concerned that further protests in central London could not only risk spreading Covid-19, but also lead to disorder, vandalism and violence.”

Read more about today's London protests here.

WATCH:

11:20 a.m. ET, June 13, 2020

Houston police officer relieved of duty after social media post with "racial undertones" 

From CNN’s Chandler Thornton

A Houston police officer was relieved of duty after a "social media post with racial undertones," according to the Houston Police Department (HPD).

In a tweet Friday, HPD said it has initiated an internal affairs investigation. 

"We are aware of a social media post with racial overtones by an HPD employee. The employee has been relieved of duty and an internal affairs investigation has been initiated. The department will report our findings and corrective action upon completion of the investigation," the tweet read.

President of the Houston Police Officers' Union Joe Gamaldi called the post "vile" and "disgusting."

"I am aware of a post circulating that is reported to come from one of our officers. It is is vile, it is is disgusting, I know it is under investigation but I am confident the @houstonpolice department will act swiftly. This is not who we are as Houston Police Officers," Gamaldi said in a tweet.

Read the police department's tweet:

9:46 a.m. ET, June 13, 2020

Thousands gather in Paris to protest police brutality

From CNN's Eva Tapiero

Thousands of people demonstrate against police brutality and racism in Paris, France, on June 13.
Thousands of people demonstrate against police brutality and racism in Paris, France, on June 13. Thibault Camus/AP

Thousands of people have gathered in central Paris to protest against police brutality – an issue symbolized by the 2016 death of a young black man, Adama Traoré, in police custody.

Saturday’s protests have been organized by 17 groups, including the family’s "Truth for Adama" campaign.

Speaking ahead of the start of the march, Adama’s sister Assa Traoré called for justice.

“Why did my brother die? Why was my brother pinned down?” she said. “My brother died the same way George Floyd did.”

“We will fight that battle with all the French people. If you don’t suffer discrimination, good for you, join us in the fight anyway," she added.

In response, a small number of far-right protesters scaled a nearby building to unfurl banners reading: “Justice for the victims of anti-white racism.”

While police have not formally banned today’s protests, gatherings of more than 10 people are not permitted under France’s coronavirus laws.

Authorities on Friday urged businesses in Place de la République and Place de l'Opéra to close and to remove anything that could be used as a weapon.

11:41 a.m. ET, June 13, 2020

George Floyd's family intends to file a civil lawsuit against Derek Chauvin, lawyer says

Attorney Ben Crump speaks with CNN's Victor Blackwell on Saturday morning.
Attorney Ben Crump speaks with CNN's Victor Blackwell on Saturday morning. CNN

Benjamin Crump, the lawyer for the family of George Floyd, told CNN they will also file a civil lawsuit against the officer who had his knee on Floyd's neck.

He said the family "intends on holding Derek Chauvin fully accountable in every aspect, criminal and civil."

Chauvin is currently facing second-degree murder charges, but CNN reported he could still receive more than $1 million in pension benefits during his retirement years even if convicted.

While a number of state laws allow for the forfeiture of pensions for those employees convicted of felony crimes related to their work, this is not the case in Minnesota.

Systematic change: Crump said the culture of police departments is what needs to change.

"It wasn't just the knee of Derek Chauvin that killed George Floyd in Minneapolis, it was the knee of the entire police department. Because when you have that kind of culture and behavior of a police department, it is foreseeable that something like this is going to happen," he said.

Crump said changing this culture starts with having transparency not only in how officers are trained, but also how they are fired.

"We have to terminate people when they use these bad policies, despite what the police unions say, because if we don't terminate them, it is absolutely predictable that you'll have somebody do a choke hold or neck restraint for 8 minutes and 46 seconds because they know there's no accountability," he said.

"There's no discipline when they do this to black people in America," Crump added.

WATCH:

12:06 p.m. ET, June 13, 2020

Protesters gather in London as statues boarded up amid fears of violence from far-right hate groups

From Nic Robertson, Simon Cullen, Max Ramsay, Mick Krever and Luke Wolagiewicz in London

Protesters gathered in Parliament Square, London, on Saturday, where statues including one of Winston Churchill are boarded up.
Protesters gathered in Parliament Square, London, on Saturday, where statues including one of Winston Churchill are boarded up. Mick Krever/CNN

Black Lives Matters protesters gathered in central London today ahead of the 5 p.m. end time set by authorities concerned after plans by far-right hate groups to stage counter-protests.

Statues of Nelson Mandela and Mahatma Gandhi were boarded up in Parliament Square. One self-declared England fan and soccer hooligan confirmed to CNN that there were threats to pull down the Mandela statue.

Workers build a protective barrier around the statue of Nelson Mandela in Parliament Square on June 12 in anticipation of protests on Saturday in London.
Workers build a protective barrier around the statue of Nelson Mandela in Parliament Square on June 12 in anticipation of protests on Saturday in London. Peter Summers/Getty Images

London Mayor Sadiq Khan urged residents to stay away from protests this weekend amid a “high” risk of violence in the city.

“I’d like to make a direct appeal to Londoners to urge you not to take to the streets to protest over the coming few days,” Khan said in a video posted on social media.

“I stand with the millions of people around the world who are saying loud and clear that Black Lives Matter,” he said, adding that the majority of protesters are peaceful. “However, I’m extremely concerned that further protests in central London could not only risk spreading Covid-19, but also lead to disorder, vandalism and violence.”

“We know that extreme far-right groups, who openly advocate hatred and division, are planning counter protests.

“This means that the risk of disorder is high.”

Khan said the counter-protests were clearly designed to provoke violence, and the best way to respond was to stay home and ignore them.

He said more than 60 police officers had already been injured while responding to previous demonstrations, adding that authorities will respond forcefully to those causing violence this time.

The UK's official Black Lives Matter group also asked protesters to stay in their local areas, and an anti-racism charity warned about the possibility of violence from "football hooligans" and far-right groups.

An earlier version of this post misidentified the statues boarded up in London. Statues of Nelson Mandela and Mahatma Gandhi have been covered.

WATCH: