June 10 Black Lives Matter protests

By Melissa Macaya, Mike Hayes, Meg Wagner, Joshua Berlinger, Steve George and Peter Wilkinson, CNN

Updated 12:44 a.m. ET, June 11, 2020
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11:59 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Floyd family lawyer to lawmakers: "You have the power to make sure George Floyd's death is not in vain"

Civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump speaks during the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Policing Practices and Law Enforcement Accountability at the U.S. Capitol on June 10 in Washington.
Civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump speaks during the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Policing Practices and Law Enforcement Accountability at the U.S. Capitol on June 10 in Washington. Michael Reynolds/Pool/Getty Images

Ben Crump called for justice for George Floyd and told lawmakers in a House hearing that they have the power to make sure his death "is not in vain."

"It's become painfully obvious that what we have right now are two systems of justice - one for white Americans and another for black Americans," Crump said.

"We are better than this," Crump said. "Chairman, members of the committee, you have the power to make this moment in history the tipping point."

"You have the power to make sure that George Floyd's death is not in vain," Crump continued.

Crump said that changing the police's behavior and their relationship with the community "starts at the top," saying the country needs a "national standard" for policing behavior built on transparency and accountability.

Crump noted that the only reason the world knows what happened to George Floyd was because it was captured on video.

Floyd "literally narrated a documentary of his death, begging for his life saying I can't breathe and calling for his mama," Crump said.

Crump said the advent of video evidence is bringing to light what "long was hidden."

"It is revealing what black Americans have known for a long, long time that it is dangerous for a black person to have an encounter with a police officer," Crump said.

WATCH:

12:04 p.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Minneapolis police chief apologizes to the media

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo responded to a question during his news conference today about complaints that journalists have been shot at with rubber bullets and tear gassed during the George Floyd protests, saying, "Our media must be protected."

He said the media has an "immense importance," adding, "I am so fortunate that all of you are here. This story has to be told." 

Arradondo said he will be looking into incidents where media were fired upon and tear gassed, saying, "That can't happen."

"That can't happen, and to our journalists here, my apologies to you and your colleagues who fell under some of that," the police chief said.
12:04 p.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Minneapolis police chief says he “did not see humanity” in video of George Floyd

From CNN's Adrienne Vogt

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo said that it was difficult for him to watch the video of former officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd’s neck. 

“I've struggled when I watched that video, that I did not see humanity,” Arradondo said. “…I did not see humanity that day for Mr. Floyd.” 

Arradondo said what he observed on the video was not indicative of police training that officers have to go through. 

“We do not shape our policies based on your years of service. We expect you to be professional. We expect you to have a duty and care for life. And if you come into conflict with policy or subculture, I expect your humanity to rise above that, and our communities expect that,” he said. 

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11:47 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Minneapolis Police Chief says being a rookie cop is no excuse for what happened to George Floyd

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo was asked today to respond to statements that attorneys for the other officers charged in George Floyd's death have made arguing that they were rookie cops following Derek Chauvin's lead.

Arradondo said, "The policies that I put out for our department, those policies are not guided in years of service. I don't put policies out to say that you should only react or respond if you're a two-year member or a five-year member or a ten-year member."

He said that if the policies or culture "get in the way" that he expects an officer's "humanity to rise above."

He said that the actions he observed from the officers involved in Floyd's death, "was not training that I ever participated in, none that I observed."

"We expect you to — whether it's verbally or physically — to call out for help and to intervene. Mr. Floyd at the very least, was expecting that," Arradondo said.

Pushed on whether being a rookie cop was a legitimate excuse by the officers in the Floyd incident, Arradondo said, "When our members put on this badge our communities should not expect any service or treatment different because you are two days on or 20 years on." 

"We expect you to serve in a manner that is providing our communities with respect, dignity, giving them voice and having neutral engagements."

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11:36 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Policing won't evolve until we address racism "head-on," Minneapolis police chief says

From CNN's Adrienne Vogt

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo said that racism in the US needs to be tackled as policing reform moves forward. 

“Race is inextricably a part of the American policing system,” Arradondo said in a news briefing. “We will never evolve in this profession if we do not address it head-on. Communities of color have paid the heaviest of costs — and that is with their lives. And our children must be safeguarded from ever having to contribute to the horrific and shameful chapter of this country's history.” 

Arradondo, who was born and raised in Minneapolis, said he didn’t see many black police officers when he was growing up. He emphasized that the officers of color who he did see “were my true sheroes and heroes.”

Arradondo said he is committed to changing the history of the city and the country with changes in policing. 

“I also recognize that parts of this department were broken, and I brought attention to that several years ago, but I did not abandon this department then, and I will not abandon this department now,” he said. “History is being written now, and I am determined to make sure that we are on the right side of history.”

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11:24 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Minneapolis police will use data to "identify early warning signs of misconduct," chief says

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo said the department will soon use officer performance data to "identify early warning signs of misconduct" as part of his plan to reform the department.

The new systems can "use research on police behavior to connect officer performance data so department leaders can identify early warning signs of misconduct and provide proven strategies to intervene," he said.

"Now why hasn't reform in this area worked in the past?" Arradondo asked at an ongoing news conference. "The academic experts who study this have revealed that supervisory action alone to remove problematic officers is very rare and significantly absent in larger departments. So for the first time in the history of policing, we here in Minneapolis will have an opportunity to use real-time data and automation to intervene with officers who engage in problematic behavior."

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11:18 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Minneapolis police chief says he will withdraw from negotiations with the police union

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo announced today that he is withdrawing from negotiation's with the city's police union to conduct a "thorough review" of the city's contract with its officers.

"Beginning today as chief I am immediately withdrawing from the contract negotiations with the Minneapolis police federation," Arradondo said today during a press conference. 

The chief outlined how he plans the contract review will go:

"I plan to bring in subject matter experience and advisors to conduct a thorough review of how the contract can be restructured to provide greater community transparency and more flexibility for true reform. Now this is not about employees benefit, wages or salary, but this is further examining those significant matters that touch on such things as critical incident protocol, our use of force, the significant role that supervisors play in this department and also the discipline process to include both grievances and arbitration."

 

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11:57 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Defunding the police is "not the answer" says Houston police chief

From CNN's Melissa Mahtani

Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo gives his opening statement over video as Philonise Floyd, brother of George Floyd, listens during the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Policing Practices and Law Enforcement Accountability at the U.S. Capitol on June 10 in Washington.
Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo gives his opening statement over video as Philonise Floyd, brother of George Floyd, listens during the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Policing Practices and Law Enforcement Accountability at the U.S. Capitol on June 10 in Washington. Michael Reynolds/Pool/Getty Images

"There's no denying that changes in policing must be made," Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo told House lawmakers during a hearing on police reform, but he said he disagrees with calls to defund the police, saying "this is simply not the answer."

"We can't let the action of bad cops let us lose sight that most cops are good," Acevedo said. "History has shown that underfunding the police can have disastrous consequences and hurt those most in need of our services."

Acevedo, who also serves as the President of the Major Cities Chiefs Association, said this is an opportunity "to have some tough conversations, to listen, to learn and to enact meaningful reform that is long overdue."

"We must acknowledge that law enforcement's past contains institutional racism, injustices and brutality. We must acknowledge that policing has had a disparate treatment and impact on disenfranchised communities, especially communities of color and poor communities," he added.

11:04 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Some fencing surrounding the White House is coming down today

From CNN's Betsy Klein

Crews remove concrete barriers behind the metal fencing in Lafayette Park in Washington on June 10.
Crews remove concrete barriers behind the metal fencing in Lafayette Park in Washington on June 10. CNN

The process of removing some of the fencing surrounding White House grounds began Wednesday morning.

Crews began removing concrete barriers behind the metal fencing on 15th Street early in the day. By the 9 o’clock hour, the barrier transfer machine had rounded the corner, lifting barriers on Constitution Avenue.

While fencing around the Ellipse is expected to be removed throughout the day, other areas of fencing along the 1.75 miles around the White House complex are expected to stay intact for the immediate future.

“The temporary fencing on the south side of the White House complex, to include the Ellipse, will be removed on or about June 10,” a US Secret Service spokesperson said Tuesday, adding, “The Secret Service is in continuing discussions with the US Park Police regarding the temporary security fencing in and around Lafayette Park.”

Fencing on H Street, near Lafayette Park and where protesters were forcibly removed from St. John’s Episcopal Church ahead of a presidential photo opportunity, remains up at this time, and the park is closed to pedestrians.

That fencing went up late last Monday evening after Trump’s photo opportunity, with the additional Ellipse fencing added later in the week.

Since then, it’s become a gathering place for protesters, signage, street art, and protest messages in bright colors in direct contrast to the metal fencing.

As CNN’s Kristin Wilson reported, activists and residents from the DC area gathered in the overnight hours and began removing signage from the fencing outside Lafayette Park, and moving it to the scaffolding at a construction zone across the street.

Cleanup efforts were also underway after much property damage to the area as some protests became violent. Teams were seen on scaffolding with flame torches around some of the metal and stone sculptures in Lafayette Park. And on 15th Street, where the side of the US Treasury Building was vandalized, two men in masks, helmets, and neon uniforms worked to clean graffiti off the building.

Fencing at the intersection of 17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue remained intact, with a small opening for staff and press.

On that fence, yellow caution tape, reading, “CRIME SCENE DO NOT CROSS.” It was not immediately clear whether the tape was official – or a sign of protest.