June 7 George Floyd protest news

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2:32 a.m. ET, June 7, 2020

Denver Broncos lead march through the city, after head coach denies there is racism in the NFL

Denver Broncos players join people protesting on June 6, in Denver, Colorado.
Denver Broncos players join people protesting on June 6, in Denver, Colorado. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

On Saturday, players and staff of the Denver Broncos led a march through the city to demonstrate against racial injustice and police brutality.

All Broncos-affiliated protesters wore shirts that matched the caption on a Twitter post by the Broncos, saying: "If you ain't with us, you against us."

The march started at the State Capitol Building and ended at the Greek Amphitheater in Civic Center Park, where players addressed the crowd.

"The time is always right to do what is right," said Broncos outside linebacker Von Miller.

Safety Justin Simmons also spoke at the event, saying: “I can’t say what this means as an African-American man to see so many people of different colors, different races coming together in solidarity."

The team's head coach, Vic Fangio, also attended the march. Fangio drew controversy earlier this week when he said he didn't believe racism or discrimination was an issue in the National Football League (NFL).

“We're a league of meritocracy, you earn what you get, you get what you earn," he said. "I don't see racism at all in the NFL, I don't see discrimination in the NFL ... If society reflected an NFL team, we'd all be great."

He apologized for the comments on Thursday, saying he realized "what I said regarding racism and discrimination in the NFL was wrong."

2:15 a.m. ET, June 7, 2020

Philadelphia newspaper editor steps down after publishing "Buildings Matter, Too" headline

From CNN's Ganesh Setty and Hollie Silverman

Philadelphia Inquirer
Philadelphia Inquirer William Thomas Cain/Getty Images

The top editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer has stepped down from his role after the newspaper published an article with the headline "Buildings Matter, Too," last week, according to an internal memo sent to newsroom staff and obtained by CNN.

Stan Wischnowski has worked for the Inquirer for 20 years and has been its executive editor for a decade, according to the memo from publisher Lisa Hughes. He is also senior vice president.

Wischnowski's last day will be June 12, Hughes said in the memo. A successor for the position has not been named..

What happened: On Tuesday, an article was published about concerns that historical buildings could be damaged during George Floyd protests. The headline said, "Buildings Matter, Too."

It immediately sparked uproar from the Inquirer staff, with more than 40 journalists of color calling out sick on Thursday. In an open letter to editors, the journalists condemned "the carelessness of our leadership (which) makes it harder to do our jobs, and at worst puts our lives at risk."

Wischnowski, along with the Inquirer's editor Gabriel Escobar and managing editor Patrick Kerkstra, signed an apology.

Read more here.

2:01 a.m. ET, June 7, 2020

Banksy speaks out: "People of colour are being failed by the system"

From CNN's Elizabeth Wells in Atlanta

Banksy, perhaps the most well-known anonymous artist and social critic in the world, has spoken out about Black Lives Matter with a new piece of art and a stark message: "People of colour are being failed by the system." 

In his latest Instagram post, Banksy said racism is a white problem -- and therefore white people are responsible for fixing it.

His piece depicts a black figure in a photo frame, which is surrounded by candles and flowers. A burning American flag hangs overhead, set alight fire by the candle beneath. 

The caption reads, “At first I thought I should just shut up and listen to black people about this issue. But why would I do that? It’s not their problem, it’s mine."

“People of color are being failed by the system. The white system. Like a broken pipe flooding the apartment of the people living downstairs. The faulty system is making their life a misery, but it’s not their job to fix it. They can’t, no one will let them in the apartment upstairs. This is a white problem. And if white people don’t fix it, someone will have to come upstairs and kick the door in.”

It is unclear where the new piece is located. A Black Lives Matter protest is planned in Bristol, England later on Sunday, near where Banksy is presumed to have been born. 

1:54 a.m. ET, June 7, 2020

The face-off between police and protesters in Portland is getting more heated

It's approaching 11 p.m. in Portland, Oregon, and there are two main protests, said Lt. Tina Jones in a video statement on Twitter.

One group, numbering several thousand people, is gathered in Irving Park.

Another group is at an intersection near the Justice Center, where police have set up a fence. Protesters and police are now standing on opposite sides of the fence.

Some protesters there have been seen distributing fireworks and using mirrors to reflect floodlights back at police, Jones said, warning that the situation was rapidly evolving.

"Crowd is throwing projectiles at police. We are advising them to stop doing so and stop tampering with the fence. We do not want to engage the crowd. We want tonight to be peaceful," said the police department on Twitter.

Earlier today, the Portland mayor directed the police chief to no longer use tear gas to disperse crowds "unless there is a serious and immediate threat to life safety, and there is no other viable alternative for dispersal."

1:39 a.m. ET, June 7, 2020

Black Lives Matter protests are gaining momentum around the world

There have been protests in solidarity with Black Lives Matter around the world all week -- and they have only gained momentum in just the past two days.

In London, protesters have used the movement to not only show solidarity, but to also call attention to the issues of racial injustice in their country.

"I feel that what happened in the US was just the spark that sparked everywhere. And (racism) happens here, I've experienced it," one protester in London told CNN earlier today.

Another protester said: "When you see that happen across the world, you feel a part of yourself die."

A protester confronts a police officer during a Black Lives Matter protest on June 6, in London.
A protester confronts a police officer during a Black Lives Matter protest on June 6, in London. Alex Pantling/Getty Images

In Australia, protests this week spanned nearly all its major cities yesterday -- Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide, and more.

Protesters here, too, are calling attention to racism within the country -- specifically toward the country's indigenous community, who have long faced discrimination, marginalization, mass incarceration, and death in police custody.

The protests here come after a 17-year-old indigenous boy was injured by a policeman in Sydney on Monday.

Indigenous protesters conduct a traditional smoking ceremony at Town Hall in Sydney, Australia, on June 6.
Indigenous protesters conduct a traditional smoking ceremony at Town Hall in Sydney, Australia, on June 6. Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images

In Canada, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau attended a Black Lives Matter Rally in Ottawa on Saturday. He knelt with protesters for 8 minutes and 46 seconds - the amount of time the police officer had his knee on George Floyd's neck. 

Several attendees thanked him for being there -- but not everyone was as thrilled about his support, with some pointing to his history of blackface.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau takes a knee during in a Black Lives Matter protest on Parliament Hill on June 5, in Ottawa, Canada.
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau takes a knee during in a Black Lives Matter protest on Parliament Hill on June 5, in Ottawa, Canada. Dave Chan/AFP/Getty Images

Other protests around the world took place in countries ranging from Lebanon to South Korea to South Africa.

1:41 a.m. ET, June 7, 2020

A New York police officer marched with protesters tonight past curfew

In New York, crowds of protesters marched through Manhattan for hours past the 8 p.m. curfew.

The march was peaceful, and the mood was re-energized after the news earlier today that four New York Police Department officers in Brooklyn had been reassigned due to their handling of the protests.

Police took a hands-off approach tonight, allowing the marchers to continue past curfew. In one case, a police officer -- identified only as Inspector Nikas by CNN Correspondent Bill Weir on the scene -- even joined the marchers around 11 p.m.

As Nikas marched, he turned around and thanked the crowd behind him for their cooperation. In return, they shouted thanks back -- and one black protester ran to the front to shake his hand.

"Do you see all these cops around us? They are not getting us because of Sgt. Inspector Nikas," the protester shouted through a microphone to the crowd, which cheered in response.

The protester threw an arm around Nikas' shoulder, and they continued marching together as the crowd chanted: "Peaceful protest."

Watch here:

1:13 a.m. ET, June 7, 2020

Police and protesters in Portland are facing off

It's past 10 p.m. in Portland, Oregon, but crowds are still out on the streets protesting in several peaceful demonstrations.

But as night draws on, tensions are rising. At one demonstration, police and protesters stand on opposite sides of a fence. The police appear to be geared up, with batons and helmets; the protesters, holding signs, chant "Stand down" and "No justice, no peace, no racist police" through the fence.

One protester shouted to the police through a loudspeaker: "This is not what we came here for. We're just here to protest ... Get out."

"I don't think they hear us. I don't think they hear any of us," he said to the crowd.

Earlier today, the Portland mayor directed the police chief to stop using tear gas to disperse crowds "unless there is a serious and immediate threat to life safety, and there is no other viable alternative for dispersal."

1:41 a.m. ET, June 7, 2020

Protester in New York: "We do not have to let systemic racism win anymore"

From CNN’s Ganesh Setty and Sheena Jones 

A group of protesters take a knee while marching in lower Manhattan, on Saturday, June 6, in New York.
A group of protesters take a knee while marching in lower Manhattan, on Saturday, June 6, in New York. Craig Ruttle/AP

In New York, protesters were still out in big crowds even after the citywide curfew kicked in.

“Listen, we are a peaceful protest. There’s no reason that we should be arrested for being outside peacefully," one protester named Paris told CNN Correspondent Bill Weir in Manhattan's Greenwich Village.

"You see no looting, you see no rioting ... The fact that they would give us a curfew at 8 p.m., they’re trying to control us. They don’t have that right to control us. If we want to speak, if we want to march, we don’t have to be silent."

Paris led some of the protesters in call-and-response chants, urging them to stay peaceful and stay close.

"United, the people will never be defeated," the crowd shouted.

"If you’re watching right now, I want you to realize wherever you are right now, you have a voice," Paris said. "You can speak up. Black lives matter. You do not have to let white supremacy rule anymore. We do not have to let systemic racism win anymore."

He also addressed the cases of police officers being suspended or charged with excessive force during the protests around the country this past week.

“That’s only happening because of us," Paris said. "If there was not this type of disturbance, that would not happen at all ... They’re listening to us because stuff like this happens in the middle of Manhattan, where thousands upon thousands upon thousands of people don’t have to stand for injustice anymore."

Watch:

12:53 a.m. ET, June 7, 2020

At least 11 protesters were arrested in New York's Nassau County

At least eleven protesters were arrested in Nassau County, New York, during a Black Lives Matter protest today. 

Ten adults and one juvenile were arrested for disorderly conduct, authorities said. 

This comes after the city saw five days of peaceful protest with no arrests. 

“For the demonstrators' safety, police repeatedly made attempts to keep protesters off the Meadowbrook Parkway. This safety precaution was met with strong opposition and resistance which resulted in the arrests of these subjects,” police said in a statement. 

Two police officers were also injured. Their conditions are unknown at this time.