June 3 George Floyd protest news

21 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
9:20 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Pope calls death of George Floyd "tragic" and says racism is a sin

Pope Francis celebrates Holy Mass on the Solemnity of Pentecost in Vatican City, Italy, on May 31.
Pope Francis celebrates Holy Mass on the Solemnity of Pentecost in Vatican City, Italy, on May 31. Grzegorz Galazka/Mondadori Portfolio/Getty Images

Pope Francis spoke out on Wednesday morning in the Vatican about the "tragic" death of George Floyd.

Speaking at his weekly Angelus prayer, the Pope said, “Dear brothers and sisters in the United States, I have witnessed with great concern the disturbing social unrest in your nation in these past days, following the tragic death of Mr. George Floyd."
“My friends, we cannot tolerate or turn a blind eye to racism and exclusion in any form and yet claim to defend the sacredness of every human life. At the same time, we have to recognize that the violence of recent nights is self-destructive and self-defeating. Nothing is gained by violence and so much is lost."

Francis added that he is praying for the “repose of the soul of George Floyd and of all those others who have lost their lives as a result of the sin of racism.”

4:15 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

The US could see a second wave of Covid-19 infections because of the protests

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams speaks during an event at the White House in Washington DC, on May 26.
U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams speaks during an event at the White House in Washington DC, on May 26. Win McNamee/Getty Images

US Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams warned the nation to expect new outbreaks of coronavirus resulting from the George Floyd protests that have seen thousands of people gather in close proximity.

"I remain concerned about the public health consequences both of individual and institutional racism (and) people out protesting in a way that is harmful to themselves and to their communities," Adams told Politico in an interview published Monday.
"Based on the way the disease spreads, there is every reason to expect that we will see new clusters and potentially new outbreaks moving forward," he added.

The US hasn't even contained its current outbreak, let alone prepare for a second wave. The nation is still seeing about 20,000 new cases of Covid-19 every day.

Some states are doing better than others -- but the entire West Coast is still seeing its infection rate tick upward, as well as South Carolina, which was one of the first states to start reopening.

9:20 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Demonstrators defied curfews but there were fewer clashes and less chaos on Tuesday night

From CNN's Madeline Holcombe

Peaceful demonstrators defied curfews Tuesday night and remained on the streets of major US cities for the eighth night of protests over George Floyd's death -- but there was less violence and fewer police clashes.

Unprecedented curfews are in place in Washington DC, Atlanta, New York City, Cleveland, and several California cities to dissuade gatherings after a weekend of sometimes violent confrontations and looting.

But that didn't stop thousands of people from showing up to call for justice following the death of George Floyd, who died last week after he was pinned to the ground by a Minneapolis police officer with his knee on Floyd's neck for 8 minutes, 46 seconds.

In Philadelphia on Tuesday, protests culminated in a nine-minute "moment" of silence.

In Los Angeles, a group of protesters knelt with their hands up in peace signs outside the home of Mayor Eric Garcetti as they waited to be arrested.

In Atlanta, where days ago a police car was lit on fire, a large crowd marched peacefully through the same streets.

And in New York City, after widespread looting and property damage on Monday night, protests on Tuesday looked completely different, said Mayor Bill de Blasio. People marched through Manhattan, with some store owners, residents and supporters lining the sides of the streets and cheering on demonstrators.

There were some confrontations: Police and protesters did clash in some cities, including Washington, DC and Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Read more here:

3:04 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Outraged Facebook staff were unconvinced by Mark Zuckerberg's explanation for inaction

Founder and CEO of Facebook Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the 56th Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany on February 15.
Founder and CEO of Facebook Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the 56th Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany on February 15. Abdulhamid Hosbas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is facing rare public outrage from within his own company over inaction on incendiary remarks recently posted by President Donald Trump.

During a company-wide town hall, Zuckerberg struggled to explain his decision-making process as many of his employees, using a real-time feedback tool, reminded him of promises to remove content that calls for violence or that could lead to imminent physical harm.

"It's crystal clear today that leadership refuses to stand with us," Brandon Dail, an engineer at Facebook, tweeted as the town hall was taking place.

Another Facebook employee told CNN Business they found Zuckerberg's answers to staff questions at the town hall lacking, and said the CEO risked alienating more of his staff rather than addressing their concerns.

Virtual walkout: Tuesday's event follows days of employee activism. On Monday, some staffers staged a virtual walkout in protest.

At least one worker, software engineer Timothy Aveni, has quit his job, saying it is no longer feasible to "keep excusing Facebook's behavior."

Contrast with Twitter: Facebook's silence on Trump's tweets -- which claimed Thursday that "when the looting starts, the shooting starts" -- stands in stark contrast to Twitter, which marked Trump's tweet as violating the platform's rules on "glorifying violence."

Earlier this week, Zuckerberg said that though Trump's tweet provoked in him a "visceral negative reaction," he felt Facebook was dedicated to "free expression."

Read more here:

9:20 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Protesters in Idaho are still demonstrating outside the state capitol

Officers from the Boise Police Department and Idaho State Troopers watch a crowd of people protesting at the Idaho Statehouse, on Sunday, May 31, in Boise, Idaho. 
Officers from the Boise Police Department and Idaho State Troopers watch a crowd of people protesting at the Idaho Statehouse, on Sunday, May 31, in Boise, Idaho.  Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/AP

As the night drags on in the US, most protests are starting to quiet down -- but protesters are still going in the Idaho capital city Boise.

Crowds of peaceful protesters are still on the steps of the state capitol, many dressed in black and holding signs bearing protest slogans.

Earlier in the night, there was a Black Lives Matter candlelit vigil for George Floyd and victims of police brutality.

Boise Mayor Lauren McLean urged protesters to stay peaceful earlier today, and reiterated the need for racial justice and diversity.

"We are asking you, Boise, for peaceful, respectful voices today and always. When we act in violence against each other, we are hurting our entire community, especially people of color who call Boise home. How does this honor the legacy of George Floyd?" she said in a statement.

Elsewhere in America: Many of the crowds gathered in major cities earlier Tuesday have now begun to taper off as curfews take hold. It's quiet in New York, with the city witnessing only sporadic acts of looting earlier in the evening. And though protesters clashed briefly with law enforcement in Washington, DC, the national capital has also remained comparatively peaceful for much of the night.

2:29 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Obama will address police violence in a livestream Wednesday 

From CNN's Liz Turrell

Sidnoma Ouango wears a President Barack Obama sweat shirt during a community effort to help store owners clean up in Bronx, New York, on Tuesday, June 2.
Sidnoma Ouango wears a President Barack Obama sweat shirt during a community effort to help store owners clean up in Bronx, New York, on Tuesday, June 2. Mark Lennihan/AP

Former President Barack Obama, along with other leaders, will “discuss the tragic events of recent weeks, the history of police violence in America, and specific action steps needed to transform a system that has led to the loss of too many lives” in a livestream on Wednesday, according to the Obama Foundation.

The livestream will happen at 5 p.m.

These will be his first on-camera comments about recent events.

On Monday he wrote in a Medium post, “Let's not excuse violence, or rationalize it, or participate in it. If we want our criminal justice system, and American society at large, to operate on a higher ethical code, then we have to model that code ourselves.”

He also said in a statement on Friday that the death of a black man in police custody, "shouldn't be 'normal' in 2020 America."

2:17 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Seattle protesters use umbrellas to block crowd control sprays

From CNN’s Andy Rose

Hundreds of protesters in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood stood in front of a police cordon Tuesday night, with dozens near the front holding umbrellas to shield themselves from crowd control chemicals such as pepper spray. 

The scene is reminiscent of last year's Hong Kong protests, during which pro-democracy protesters regularly deployed the use of umbrellas in clashes with the city's security forces.

Earlier in the day, Seattle demonstrators were heard chanting “No more gas!” to law enforcement in footage from CNN affiliate KIRO.

Seattle is under a nightly 10 p.m. curfew, which Mayor Jenny Durkan extended through Saturday.

1:35 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Denver Broncos head coach: "I don't see racism at all in the NFL"

Head coach Vic Fangio of the Denver Broncos speaks to the media at the Indiana Convention Center  in Indianapolis, Indiana, on February 25.
Head coach Vic Fangio of the Denver Broncos speaks to the media at the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis, Indiana, on February 25. Michael Hickey/Getty Images

In an interview on Tuesday, Denver Broncos head coach Vic Fangio told reporters he doesn’t believe racism or discrimination is an issue in the National Football League.

"I think our problems in the NFL along those lines are minimal,” Fangio said. “We're a league of meritocracy, you earn what you get, you get what you earn. I don't see racism at all in the NFL, I don't see discrimination in the NFL ... We’re lucky. We all live together, joined as one, for one common goal, and we all intermingle and mix tremendously. If society reflected an NFL team, we'd all be great."

He called George Floyd’s death a "societal issue that we all have to join in to correct.”

Protesting racial injustice: The NFL has been embroiled in controversies surrounding racial inequity and representation for years.

The symbolic act of taking a knee, now ubiquitous in protests across the US, was popularized by former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who began kneeling during the National Anthem at NFL games in 2016 to protest police brutality and racial injustice.

Since then, Kaepernick has not been re-signed by any club -- and some supporters argue he has been effectively blacklisted for his activism.

Diversity in the NFL: Only four NFL teams have a nonwhite head coach, and just two of the current general managers are minorities.

Of the five head coaching vacancies in the offseason, just one was filled by a nonwhite person – Ron Rivera, who is Hispanic.

On May 19, following a virtual league meeting, the NFL announced an expansion of coach position hiring requirements and implementation of enhanced diversity policies.

9:20 a.m. ET, June 3, 2020

New York police arrested 200 protesters tonight

Police detain a protester who declined to get off the streets during curfew in New York, on Tuesday, June 2.
Police detain a protester who declined to get off the streets during curfew in New York, on Tuesday, June 2. Wong Maye-E/AP

New York police arrested about 200 protesters across the city tonight, and that number is expected to increase, a law enforcement official told CNN.

It's now past 1 a.m. in New York. The curfew went into effect at 8 p.m.

Most of the protests today have been peaceful, said CNN Correspondent Shimon Prokupecz. People marched through Manhattan, with some storeowners, residents and supporters lining the sides of the streets and cheering on demonstrators.

Though there were some instances of looting tonight, it was nowhere as widespread or chaotic as the looting seen on Monday night, which had targeted stores across Manhattan.

At one point, protesters trying to cross the Manhattan Bridge from Brooklyn to Manhattan were blocked off by police, who closed the Manhattan side of the bridge. There were fears of a confrontation, but police allowed the protesters to turn around and walk off the bridge back into Brooklyn without arrests.