June 1 George Floyd protest news

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2:56 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

White House on Trump's handling of protests: "This President has been leading"

From CNN's Nikki Carvajal

White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany talks to reporters during a news conference at the White House June 1, in Washington.
White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany talks to reporters during a news conference at the White House June 1, in Washington. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany defended Trump’s handling of widespread unrest across the country during a Monday press briefing. 

Asked if the President was “hiding out” on the issue of the protests, she responded:

“I was on the phone with the President at least half a dozen times yesterday and every time I talk to him, he was telling me about a different action he has taken whether it was talking to a governor about this or a foreign leader about ventilators. This President has been leading."

“He met with generals yesterday, each and every moment taking another action to try to solve and resolve what we have seen in the streets where the governors have failed, he has stepped in,” McEnany continued, taking a shot at the response to protests by state leaders.

“He is asking. He is hard at work. You heard from him on this issue any number of times, and he is working because that is the job the President to keep this country safe," she added.

President Trump has made limited on-camera comments about the protests in recent days. On Friday, the New York Times first reported that the President was taken to a secure underground bunker beneath the White House as protests raged in Lafayette Park. 

4:06 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

Two more California cities will implement curfews

A black man and a white woman hold their hands up in a front of police officers in downtown Long Beach on May 31, 2020 during a protest against the death of George Floyd.
A black man and a white woman hold their hands up in a front of police officers in downtown Long Beach on May 31, 2020 during a protest against the death of George Floyd. Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images

The city of Long Beach, California, will implement a 1 p.m. PDT curfew for business districts and 4 p.m. PDT curfew for the entire city, said Mayor Robert Garcia today. 

Mayor Garcia said the majority of the protest group Sunday was peaceful but a small group created chaos. “I gotta tell you, that was offensive,” he said.

Mayor Garcia apologized to a local reporter, Adolfo Guzman-Lopez, who was hit by a rubber bullet in the throat during the chaos on Sunday. 

Long Beach Police Chief Robert Luna says an average call load is about 1,726/day but Sunday they received 4,686 calls for service. Police made about 75 arrests Sunday. 

The city of Riverside will observe a curfew from 7 p.m. Monday until 6 a.m. PDT Tuesday.

More context: Other California cities including Santa Monica and Beverly Hills are under curfew today.

2:43 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

Additional "federal assets" will be deployed to respond to violent protests, White House says

From CNN's Nikki Carvajal 

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany speaks during a news conference at the White House, Monday, June 1, 2020, in Washington.
White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany speaks during a news conference at the White House, Monday, June 1, 2020, in Washington. Patrick Semansky/AP

Additional “federal assets” will be deployed nationwide to help law enforcement with violent protests, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters during a briefing Monday afternoon.

“I’m not going to get ahead of any actions that will be announced but what I will say to you is that that he has had two briefings today, Secretary (Mark) Esper, AG (William) Barr, General (Mark) Milley was there,” McEnany said.

“There will be additional federal assets deployed, and a central command center in commission with the state and local governments that will include General Milley, and AG Barr,” she added, before declining to give any further details. 

Asked if the President was planning on deploying resources beyond the National Guard, McEnany said he was.

“We’re looking at every tool in the federal tool kit for us, ideally this would have been resolved at the state level. The states, after all, have police power embedded in the 10th amendment, it is their responsibility to patrol their streets,” she said. 

“There are many federal authorities including the one you cited that are available to us,” McEnany added.

2:41 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

Secret Service says nobody has crossed White House fence during DC protests

From CNN's Betsy Klein 

Police form a line on H Street as demonstrators gather to protest the death of George Floyd, Sunday, May 31, 2020, near the White House in Washington.
Police form a line on H Street as demonstrators gather to protest the death of George Floyd, Sunday, May 31, 2020, near the White House in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP

The US Secret Service said in a statement to CNN that no one has breached the White House fence line during demonstrations in Washington.

A USSS spokesperson sent the following statement in response to CNN’s inquiries regarding last night’s protests at the White House: 

“The U.S. Secret Service continues to work closely with all relevant partners, to include the U.S. Park Police, Metropolitan Police, National Guard, DC Fire and Emergency Medical Services, and Arlington County Police during ongoing demonstrations. The Secret Service respects the right to assemble, and continues to appreciate those individuals who exercise that right safely as we and our partners continue to serve and protect.Throughout these demonstrations, no individuals have crossed the White House fence line, and no Secret Service protectees have been in danger.”
2:40 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

White House says statements "don't stop anarchy" when asked about possible national address

From CNN's Allie Malloy

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany was just asked why President Trump hasn’t made an address to the nation regarding protests across the country. She pointed to past statements the President has made and said that statements “don’t stop anarchy.” 

“What I would note is continual statements as he’s made day and day again — they don’t stop anarchy. What stops anarchy is action. And that’s what the President is working on right now for the anarchists,” McEnany told reporters.  

“Continual statements — they don’t stop anarchy. What stops anarchy is action,” McEnany told reporters Monday.  

Asked why he hadn’t addressed the nation, McEnany told reporters that Trump has “delivered multiple statements on this,” pointing to comments he made on the death of George Floyd while speaking at the SpaceX launch on Saturday. 

2:35 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

West Virginia governor on Floyd's death: "I don't see how in the world a thing like that could happen"

From CNN's Gregory Lemos 

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice addressed the national outcry over George Floyd's death at the top of his news conference Monday saying, "I don't see how in the world a thing like that could happen, especially when an individual is crying out, you know, and saying they can't breathe."  

"I don't see how any West Virginian could think that's excusable. And we don't," Justice said.  

The governor applauded residents of his state for their peaceful protesting.  

"How have you done it? You've done it in a peaceful manner," Justice said. "We will be the guiding light again, as we have been in this pandemic."  

Justice also addressed groups or individuals possibly coming into the state "that really want evil" and said "they will absolutely not be welcome in the most stringent ways." 

2:33 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

Almost half of protesters arrested in Boston not from the city, police chief says

From CNN’s Gregory Lemos

Boston Police Commissioner William Gross said that of the 53 arrests that happened Sunday night into Monday morning, 27 were Bostonians, 24 were from outside the city, and two were from out of state.  

"I want to break the negative stereotypical view and perception that, even though others protested peacefully, that those hell bent on destruction just came from the inner city of Boston,” Gross said during a news conference with Boston Mayor Marty Walsh Monday. “That is just not the case.”
2:30 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

Minnesota governor calls for partial demobilization of National Guard

From CNN's Artemis Moshtaghian

The head of Minnesota's National Guard Major General Jon Jensen said in a news conference Monday that the governor has called for the partial demobilization of the National Guard in the state.

“This morning we received guidance from the governor as it relates to demobilization of the Minnesota National Guard and the return of part of the Minnesota National Guard back to their hometowns,” Jensen said.

He added that this is "not an order to return the entire organization back home."

This partial demobilization of troops comes ahead of what Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz called “a significant event” with the funeral of George Floyd scheduled for Thursday.

There are currently 7,000 Minnesota National Guardsmen mobilized, Jensen said.

Walz said even though they’re planning on relieving active duties from some National Guardsmen, the state will continue to keep in place the multiagency command center they’ve used to communicate throughout the week.

“I think some of you now have witnessed the complexity of something like this it doesn't look like the movies. You have to get everybody on the same frequencies, you have to have communications to move people and when you see an operation move in unison,” Gov. Walz added.

2:30 p.m. ET, June 1, 2020

Chicago police chief: "We stand with Mr. Floyd's family"

From CNN's Konstantin Toropin

Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown listens to a question about the Memorial Day weekend violence during a news conference Tuesday, May 26, in Chicago.
Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown listens to a question about the Memorial Day weekend violence during a news conference Tuesday, May 26, in Chicago. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown called actions of the Minneapolis police that led to the death of George Floyd embarrassing and described the act itself as "murder" today at a news conference.

Brown, who recounted an encounter with a young protester who was chanting "say his name," explained that the situation left him "embarrassed."  

"I was holding the line supporting the officers. I whispered his name when she chanted to say his name," Brown said.

"Today, publicly, I want to say his name. As a police leader of the second largest police department in the country — Mr. George Floyd," he said.

"We are embarrassed by the cops in Minneapolis use of force, asphyxiating you on the streets of Minneapolis," Brown said.

However, Brown also had strong criticism for people causing destruction in Chicago.

"We stand with Mr. Floyd's family, but to the rioters and looters: you disgraced the name of Mr. Floyd by your actions," Brown said.

"Hate can never drive out hate. Evil can never drive out evil," he added.