George Floyd protests spread nationwide

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5:27 p.m. ET, May 28, 2020

Minnesota governor activating National Guard in wake of protests over George Floyd’s death

From CNN’s Jessica Jordan

Protesters march on Hiawatha Avenue while decrying the killing of George Floyd on May 26 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Protesters march on Hiawatha Avenue while decrying the killing of George Floyd on May 26 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Gov. Tim Walz signed an executive order Thursday activating the Minnesota National Guard after protests and demonstrations erupted throughout Minneapolis and St. Paul following the death of George Floyd.

Floyd's death this week sparked protests across the country after video emerged that shows the 46-year-old black man handcuffed and on the ground saying, "I can't breathe," as a police officer holds him down with a knee on his neck.

All four officers involved in the incident have been fired from the Minneapolis Police Department. But that has not quieted calls for them to face criminal charges.

 

5:13 p.m. ET, May 28, 2020

Chicago police officers required to complete mandatory training after George Floyd's death

From CNN’s Brad Parks

Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown speaks during a news conference on May 26 in Chicago.
Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown speaks during a news conference on May 26 in Chicago. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown said that he has addressed the George Floyd death in Minneapolis with his command officers and has required that they address the incident with the officers under their command.

“I have ordered mandatory training on positional asphyxiation to be completed by every officer throughout the Department by the end of each tour today. I have also required officers to view the video of this incident,” Brown said in a statement. 

“What took place in Minneapolis earlier this week is absolutely reprehensible and tarnishes the bade nationwide, including here in Chicago. I want to make it clear that this behavior is not acceptable in Chicago, will not be tolerated under my command and quite frankly has no place in law enforcement anywhere," Brown said.

He said the department has been working to "develop authentic relationships and restore trust with our communities" and that incidents like this "certainly make our jobs more difficult."

“These actions are not reflective of the overwhelming amount of officers committed to constitutional policing nationwide. Any officer who abuses their power or stands by and allows it to happen does not deserve to wear the badge, period," Brown said in the statement.

5:08 p.m. ET, May 28, 2020

Trump says footage of Floyd's death is "a very shocking sight"

From CNN's Sarah Westwood

 

President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on May 28 in Washington.
President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on May 28 in Washington. Evan Vucci/AP

President Trump said he feels “very, very badly” for what happened to George Floyd, but said he has not yet spoken with Floyd’s family.

“That’s a very shocking sight,” Trump said of the footage of Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police officers. “I saw it last night and I didn’t like it,” he said, adding that the it was a “very, very bad thing that I saw.”

Trump said he and Attorney General Bill Barr had been discussing the case before reporters arrived. 

“We’re very much involved,” Trump said. He noted federal authorities would “take a very strong look” at what happened, but he declined to say whether he believes the officers involved should be charged with murder. 

He was speaking to reporters in the Oval Office ahead of signing a social media executive order.

Earlier this afternoon, press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters the President received a briefing on the Floyd case from Attorney General Bill Barr and the FBI Deputy Director David Bowdich.

Trump tweeted on Wednesday evening that he had asked the FBI and Department of Justice to pursue an investigation of Floyd’s death.

Watch:

4:46 p.m. ET, May 28, 2020

Chicago mayor calls George Floyd death "sickening"

From CNN's Renee Baharaeen 

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot speaks during a press conference in Chicago on May 28.
Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot speaks during a press conference in Chicago on May 28. Pool/WLS

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot addressed the recent death of George Floyd at the beginning of her Thursday news conference in Chicago.  

“I ran for mayor in the aftermath of the murder of Laquan McDonald. I was sickened watching our community struggle under the weight of racial disparities and systemic inequities,” Lightfoot said. 

“Seeing the video of George Floyd dying on the ground under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer for me brought back that trauma of Laquan McDonald’s death in sharp focus," she said.

Later in the press conference, Lightfoot added: “To watch the entirety of that video and to see the life leave another human being on the ground, begging for his life, saying he can’t breathe, getting no relief – and then just seeing when the paramedics came how callously they treated him almost like he was a piece of meat – it’s sickening. And I want to make sure that something like that doesn’t happen in our city.”

4:24 p.m. ET, May 28, 2020

Law enforcement to speak soon on Floyd investigation 

From CNN's Hollie Silverman

Federal and state law enforcement officials will make a statement regarding the investigation into the death of George Floyd during a Thursday afternoon press conference, according to a press release from the FBI.

US Attorney Erica MacDonald and Rainer Drolshagen, FBI special agent in charge, are among the speakers. Minnesota Department of Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington will also be speaking in the news conference.

4:36 p.m. ET, May 28, 2020

Minneapolis city council member: Racism is a virus "that has affected our entire society for far too long"

From CNN's Maureen Chowdhury

Andrea Jenkins, vice president of the Minneapolis City Council, said that racism is a virus “that has affected our entire society for far too long,” responding to the death of George Floyd.

Jenkins represents the community where Floyd died.

“The people in my community are pained, are traumatized... We must absolutely must see justice for George. That is what community is seeking. That is what community is asking for,” Jenkins told CNN’s Brooke Baldwin.

She added that while she does not condone the violence and looting that stemmed from the protests, she also understands “the outrage that people are expressing.”  

When asked by Baldwin if she had any had a message for white America on how they can act in regard to racism in the country, Jenkins said:

“I wish I had all the smart answers to provide to white people.
A. Stop killing us.
B. Give black people opportunities to live full, healthy lives. That means access to employment... that means access to safe and affordable housing.
We are in the midst of a pandemic right now and we need to see resources going to the most vulnerable people… however, nobody is providing those kinds of issues.”

Jenkins added that while she isn’t calling any single person a racist, she believes that people who benefit from racism are “the only people that can end it.”

“We need white people to stop perpetuating the system of racism,” she said.

Jenkins called on officials to declare racism a public health issue during a news conference today.

4:16 p.m. ET, May 28, 2020

Minneapolis shuts down public transit service this evening

From CNN's Konstantin Toropin

Metro Transit, Minneapolis' public transit service, announced it will suspend bus and light rail service this evening in a tweet.

“Out of concern for the safety of riders and employees, Metro Transit bus and light rail service will be suspended from 4 pm thru at least the rest of Thursday," the tweet read, in part.

The city has been gripped by protests and riots in reaction to the death of George Floyd.

Read the tweet:

3:36 p.m. ET, May 28, 2020

Fired Minneapolis officer had 18 complaints against him 

From CNN's Melissa Alonso

Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer, is seen with his knee on the neck of George Floyd. Floyd later died.
Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer, is seen with his knee on the neck of George Floyd. Floyd later died. From Darnella Frazier

Derek Chauvin, the former police officer seen with his knee on George Floyd’s neck, had 18 prior complaints filed with Minneapolis Police Department's (MPD) Internal Affairs, according to MPD. 

It's not clear what the internal affairs complaints were for and no detail was provided by MPD. 

Only two of the 18 complaints against Chauvin were "closed with discipline," according to a MPD internal affairs public summary. 

The "discipline issued" column listed a letter of reprimand for each of the two complaints.  

Former officer Tou Thao had six complaints filed with internal affairs, one of which was still open, the summary said. The other five were closed without discipline.  

Former Minneapolis police officers J Alexander Kueng and Thomas Lane had no complaints filed, according to a MPD internal affairs public summary. 

CNN has reached out to attorneys representing the officers for comment. 

2:51 p.m. ET, May 28, 2020

Trump "very upset" after seeing video of George Floyd, White House says

From CNN's Nikki Carvajal 

Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump was “very upset” by the video that sparked outrage over the death of George Floyd in Minnesota, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters Thursday afternoon. 

“He was very upset when he saw that video,” she said, adding that the President watched the video on Air Force One.  

“He was very upset by it. It was egregious. Appalling. Tragic. And it prompted him to pick up the phone, or the chief of staff to pick up the phone and say we need to expedite what was already an FBI investigation,” McEnany continued. “He wants justice to be served.” 

McEnany told reporters that Trump was being briefed this afternoon by Attorney General Bill Barr about the incident.