At least 31 killed in US weekend mass shootings

12:35 p.m. ET, August 5, 2019

Trump offered prayers for "those who perished in Toledo"

In his remarks about the mass shootings in Texas and Ohio this weekend, President Trump misidentified the city where one of the deadly attacks took place.

President Trump offered prayers for "those who perished in Toledo." The Ohio shooting took place in Dayton, which is about 150 miles south of Toledo. The Texas shooting took place in El Paso, which is about 1,600 miles from Toledo.

"May God bless the memory of those who perished in Toledo, and may God protect them," Trump said. "May God protect all of those from Texas to Ohio, may God bless the victims and their families, may God bless America."

Later, Toledo Mayor Wade Kapszukiewicz said the city is "happy to accept his prayers, even if they were meant for Dayton."

Meanwhile, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley said this when asked if the President would visit: "I've heard that he's coming Wednesday, but I've not gotten a call. And you know, he might be going to Toledo. I don't know."

Watch the moment:

Some context: Trump wasn't the only person to get the city wrong. At a fundraiser in San Diego, Joe Biden referred to the shootings in Houston and the day before in Michigan, before correcting it later.

10:30 a.m. ET, August 5, 2019

Trump calls for instituting the death penalty for hate crimes

Trump said during his White House statement that he's "directing the Department of Justice to propose legislation ensuring that those who commit hate crimes and mass murders face the death penalty."

He added that capital punishment in these cases should be "delivered quickly, decisively, and without years of needless delay."

More context: Federal authorities are treating the El Paso mass shooting as a case of domestic terrorism, the US Attorney for the Western District of Texas said Sunday.

The Justice Department is also "seriously considering" bringing federal hate crime and federal firearm charges, which carry a possible death penalty, US Attorney John Bash said Sunday in a news conference.

10:23 a.m. ET, August 5, 2019

Trump describes attacks as "domestic terrorism"

President Trump called the weekend shooting attacks “domestic terrorism,” adding that he’s called on the FBI to devote further resources to preventing further attacks.

He identified the internet and social media as areas for reform.

“We have asked the FBI to identify all further resources they need to investigate and disrupt hate crimes and domestic terrorism.

Whatever they need. We must recognize that the internet has provided a dangerous avenue to radicalized disturbed minds and perform demented acts,” Trump said.

“We must shine a light on the dark recesses of the internet and stop mass murderers before they start,” he continued.

1:06 p.m. ET, August 5, 2019

President Trump cites "gruesome and grisly" video games in response to mass shootings

President Trump said video games that "celebrate violence" need to be addressed, while responding to two mass shootings that happened over the weekend.

He said "we must stop the glorification of violence in our society."

He continued: "This includes the gruesome and grisly video games that are now commonplace. It is too easy today for troubled youth to surround themselves with a culture that celebrates violence. We must stop or substantially reduce this and it has to begin immediately," Trump said.

Other Republican leaders also cited video games for the mass shootings.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said Sunday on Fox News, "But the idea of these video games that dehumanize individuals to have a game of shooting individuals and others -- I've always felt that is a problem for future generations and others."

Trump has done this before: After the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida, Trump signaled he believed violence in video games is partly to blame for real life violence and held a meeting between representatives from the video game industry and those who think games have made kids more violent in recent years.

10:20 a.m. ET, August 5, 2019

Trump: The internet provides "a dangerous avenue to radicalize disturbed minds"

In the wake of the mass shooting in El Paso, Texas, President Trump said the internet has "provided a dangerous avenue to radicalize disturbed minds and perform demented acts."

"We must shine light on the dark recesses of the internet and stop mass murders before they start."

He continued: "The internet, likewise, is used for human trafficking, illegal drug distribution and so many other heinous crimes. The perils of the internet and social media cannot be ignored and they will not be ignored."

Some background: Saturday's shooting in El Paso is at least the third atrocity this year where a suspect is believed to have posted to 8chan in advance of an attack.

8chan is an online messaging board that has been used by anonymous accounts to share extremist messages and cheer on mass shooters. It is rife with racist and anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.

Law enforcement officials in El Paso, Texas, confirmed on Saturday they were investigating a document posted on 8chan that they believe was written by Patrick Crusius, the shooting suspect. The four-page document posted online espouses white nationalist and racist views.

10:19 a.m. ET, August 5, 2019

Trump condemns "racism, bigotry and white supremacy," but doesn't acknowledge his own rhetoric

President Trump called the gunman who killed 20 people in El Paso Texas a "wicked man" and urged the country to condemn white supremacy. He stopped short of acknowledging his own divisive and racist rhetoric.

"The shooter in El Paso posted a manifesto online consumed by racist hate. In one voice, our nation must condemn racism, bigotry and white supremacy."

Officials said the El Paso shooter may face hate crime charges after police found a racist, anti-immigrant document they believe was written by the 21-year-old white male suspect.

The four-page document posted online espouses white nationalist and racist views. It rails against immigrants and Hispanics, blaming immigrants and first-generation Americans for taking away jobs and for the blending of cultures in the US.

10:15 a.m. ET, August 5, 2019

Mexican President calls for stricter gun laws in the US

Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador
Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador Manuel Velasquez/Getty Images

Mexico's president is responding to the mass shooting in El Paso that killed both US and Mexican citizens.

President Andrés Manuel López Obrador said it is very probable Mexico will make a legal complaint against the shooter.

“I’ll just say this, to liberate ourselves, to balance ourselves, we want a respectful relationship with the US government and to say that we lament the loss of human lives in that country. It hurts about our dead, but it also hurts the loss of lives of other nationalities,” López Obrador said in a Monday press conference.

López Obrador said going forward, the country will continue to vouch for stricter gun laws in the US, while also saying they will not interfere with the country's affairs.

“We are very respectful of other countries decisions, but we think that this unfortunate event that are presented in the US, should be reflected on and analyzed in the decision to control the unvetted selling of gun. I say this will all respect,” he continued. “It is not our intention to put ourselves in the external life of any country. But they should rethink this matter, because it affects a lot."
He continued: "That does not happen in our country. As well, in a very respectful matter, we could send information about our legislation and the proceedings that we follow on this matter to help, cooperate, in everything we can.”

Some background: At least 20 people were killed and 26 more were injured on Saturday in a shooting at an El Paso Walmart. Federal authorities are treating the mass shooting as a case of domestic terrorism, the US Attorney for the Western District of Texas said Sunday.

Police say a racist, anti-immigrant document they believe was written by the 21-year-old white male suspect has a "nexus to a potential hate crime."