Derek Chauvin is on trial for George Floyd's death

By Melissa Macaya, Mike Hayes, Meg Wagner, Melissa Mahtani, Veronica Rocha and Fernando Alfonso III, CNN

Updated 10:11 PM ET, Wed March 31, 2021
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3:00 p.m. ET, March 31, 2021

Hearing testimony about George Floyd's death can be difficult. Here are some resources that may help.

Witness testimony has continued today in the trial of former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin, who's been charged in the death of George Floyd. 

Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, died in May 2020 after Chauvin placed his knee on Floyd's neck while he pleaded, "I can't breathe."

Hearing witnesses testify and dissect second-by-second accounts of the circumstances surrounding Floyd's death can be tough.

Here are some resources that may help:

You can contact any of the organizations above to find peer groups and other group counseling services. These organizations often have affiliates in cities that host group meetings. They offer coping mechanisms to deal with stress, depression, anxiety and other mental health conditions.

It's always important to speak to someone and not feel that you're facing this alone.

You can find more CNN resources that may help here.

4:06 p.m. ET, March 31, 2021

Witness breaks down in court after watching footage of George Floyd's arrest

Pool
Pool

Charles McMillian, who was one of the first bystanders on the scene as George Floyd was being taken into custody in May 2020, broke down on the stand during his testimony after watching graphic footage of Floyd's arrest.

The video showed officers trying to get Floyd into a squad car, then struggling with the police. Floyd can be heard in the footage saying he's "claustrophobic" and struggling to breathe.

Before the struggle began, McMillian was on the sidewalk telling Floyd to comply with the police, saying "you can't win."

After the video was shown, McMillian became extremely emotional on the stand. After a prosecutor tried to console him the judge decided to take a break from the trial.

The court took a short break and McMillian resumed his testimony.

Watch here:

2:48 p.m. ET, March 31, 2021

The trial is in a short break

The trial is in a 10 minute break.

The judge asked that the court go into a recess after witness Charles McMillian broke down in tears while watching footage of George Floyd's arrest.

2:48 p.m. ET, March 31, 2021

Witness who saw Floyd detained had seen Chauvin in the community 5 days prior

Witness Charles McMillian testified that he had seen former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin in South Minneapolis five days before the incident involving George Floyd.

"Five days prior to this happening, I pulled up on a squad car somewhere in South Minneapolis, and I seen Mr. Chauvin, and I told him like other officers, 'at the end of the day you go to your family safe, and the next person goes to their home safe,'" McMillian said during testimony today in Minneapolis.

"I had seen him through the community, I didn't know him," he added.

2:46 p.m. ET, March 31, 2021

Witness says he was telling Floyd to comply with police

Pool
Pool

Charles McMillian, a man who watched officers detain George Floyd, said he was telling Floyd to comply with police as they were trying to get him into the police car.

"The officer was, you know, trying to get him in the car and everything, talking to him, I was telling him, Mr. Floyd, Mr. Floyd just comply, get in the car because you can't win. Something to that nature," McMillian testified.

He said he was just trying to make the situation easier and help.

"Because I've had interaction with officers myself, and I understand once you get in the car, you can't win, you're done. That's the way I look at it," he said.

McMillian said that Floyd was handcuffed the whole time and that he was hearing and understanding what McMillian was saying.

2:24 p.m. ET, March 31, 2021

The trial is back in session after a lunch break

Testimony in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin has just resumed after the court's lunch break.

Witness Charles McMillian, 61, has just taken the stand.

1:21 p.m. ET, March 31, 2021

New cell phone video shows moments after George Floyd was pulled out of his car

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Pool

New cell phone video from Christopher Belfrey, a Minneapolis resident who was parking his car on the street corner, shows the moments after George Floyd was pulled out of the car by officers.

The video shows two officers standing above Floyd who is handcuffed, sitting on the ground.

Belfrey said he saw Floyd sitting in the driver's seat of a car before officers arrived. He was in his vehicle outside of Cup Foods waiting for his fiancé who was in the store.

"They brought him out, walked him over to the sidewalk and sat him down. One officer then went over to the other people that was in the vehicle and started asking them questions," he said during testimony.

Belfrey said he stopped recording because he started getting "nervous."

"One of the officers kept staring at me while I was recording so I kind of put it down. Then I went to record again and then I was, like, I really don't want any problems so I stopped recording," he said.

He said when he stopped recording, he saw officers take Floyd across the street. Belfrey said he starting driving away when he thought officers were detaining Floyd.

Watch:

1:16 p.m. ET, March 31, 2021

Another eyewitness is now testifying at the Chauvin trial

Pool
Pool

The next witness testifying is Christopher Belfrey, a Minneapolis resident who was parking his car on the street corner when he saw officers approach George Floyd's vehicle.

He said he started recording when he saw one of the officers with his gun drawn.

"I saw the officer raise his gun. I started recording," Belfrey said. 

His testimony is ongoing.

1:18 p.m. ET, March 31, 2021

CNN legal analyst Laura Coates: Remember George Floyd is not on trial, Derek Chauvin is

Analysis from CNN's Laura Coates / Written by CNN's Maureen Chowdhury

CNN legal analyst Laura Coates noted during the trial's break that the prosecution's decision to bring up the potential use of a counterfeit bill by George Floyd and whether or not he was under the influence, is a "preemptive" strategy to "take the wind out of the sails of any sort of 'gotcha' moment by the defense who tried to put George Floyd on trial."

Coates reminded viewers that Floyd is not on trial, but former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin and whether or not he used excessive deadly force is.

"Keep in mind here that this sets the stage for why the officers are called, it does not go to the meat of the matter of this trial which is whether the officer, then officer Derek Chauvin, used excessive and deadly force when the threat had been neutralized. And whether that was the potential causal factor in his death. So, all of this sets the scene, sets the stage, of whether there was a counterfeit bill, his own interaction with George Floyd, not relevant because George Floyd remember is not on trial, the witness is not on trial, the other eyewitnesses are not on trial. It is Derek Chauvin," Coates told CNN's John King.