June 21 coronavirus news

By Melissa Macaya, Melissa Mahtani, Meg Wagner and Veronica Rocha, CNN

Updated 7:58 PM ET, Mon June 21, 2021
15 Posts
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12:07 p.m. ET, June 21, 2021

Biden administration announces plan to share 55 million Covid-19 doses abroad

From CNN's Betsy Klein

The Biden administration on Monday is releasing its plan for allocating an additional 55 million Covid vaccines globally by the end of this month. Roughly 75% of the doses will be shared through the COVAX global vaccine program, with the remaining 25% shared with countries with regional priorities and other considerations.

As CNN reported, the administration will be distributing 55 million doses of Johnson & Johnson, Moderna, and Pfizer’s vaccines abroad, most of which will be J&J and Moderna. As of Monday, the 55 million AstraZeneca doses are still not cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration for safety and efficacy review yet. 

Approximately 41 million of the 55 million doses will be shared through COVAX, with 14 million for Latin American and Caribbean countries, 16 million for Asia, 10 million for Africa.

The remaining approximately 14 million doses “will be shared with regional priorities and other recipients, such as: Colombia, Argentina, Haiti, other CARICOM countries, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Panama, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, Cabo Verde, Egypt, Jordan, Iraq, Yemen, Tunisia, Oman, West Bank and Gaza, Ukraine, Kosovo, Georgia, Moldova, and Bosnia.” 

The White House said in a statement that the vaccines will be distributed “as expeditiously as possible,” noting that the process “will take time” due to regulatory and legal transport requirements.

The doses, the White House said, should be prioritized for “those most at risk, such as health care workers, should be prioritized, based on national vaccine plans.” The White House will be announcing which vaccines will go to which country once they are shipped out.

12:03 p.m. ET, June 21, 2021

Vaccinated Canadians, permanent residents will no longer have to quarantine when entering Canada 

From CNN’s Paula Newton

A healthcare worker administers a Moderna COVID-19 vaccination at Toronto and Region Islamic Congregation Islamic Centre on April 1 in Toronto, Canada.
A healthcare worker administers a Moderna COVID-19 vaccination at Toronto and Region Islamic Congregation Islamic Centre on April 1 in Toronto, Canada. Cole Burston/Getty Images

Fully vaccinated Canadians and permanent residents will no longer have to quarantine for 14 days when entering Canada beginning July 5 just before midnight, federal officials announced Monday.  

This ends both a 14-day mandatory quarantine for non-essential travelers returning to Canada and a hotel quarantine that was imposed several months ago. 

These policy changes do not apply to fully vaccinated foreign nationals, including US citizens. The US, Canada border remains closed to foreign nationals and non-essential travel until at least July 21.

“On both sides of the border we’re proceeding with appropriate caution and care and taking the advice of our public health experts as we begin to ease border measures. But clearly we're not in there yet and we've got a lot of work to do and I think it's another opportunity just encourage Canadians to continue to get those vaccinations,” said Bill Blair, Canada’s public security minister during a press conference in Ottawa Monday.  

In order to avoid quarantine, travelers will have to provide proof of full vaccination at least 14 days prior to travel and a negative Covid-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of entering Canada. 

All those entering Canada will be required to self-isolate at home until the results of an arrival Covid-19 test comes back negative. 

As of Monday, Canada’s Public Health Agency reported that more than 75% of eligible Canadians has received at least one dose of a vaccine and more than 20% of eligible residents were fully vaccinated. 

Federal officials called this a "first phase" of reopening given the pace of vaccination in Canada. 

11:14 a.m. ET, June 21, 2021

It wasn't just the flu: Other respiratory illness plummeted during pandemic, study shows

From CNN's Maggie Fox

Flu cases nearly disappeared during the pandemic but it wasn't the only winter bug affected by pandemic-related distancing and hygiene measures.

Wisconsin researchers reported Monday they found a range of respiratory infections significantly down during the 2020-2021 flu season.

Not only that, but so did the number of prescriptions for antibiotics – something that indicates having rapid tests on hand to diagnose just what germ is causing an infection may cut down on unnecessary drug prescriptions.

“Winter seasonal viruses (influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and seasonal coronavirus) currently average 12 per month compared with 4,800 per month in previous seasons," Dr. Alexander Lepak and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine wrote in their report, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association’s JAMA Internal Medicine.

“Other respiratory virus detections also decreased from 560 per month pre-pandemic to 228 per month during the pandemic," they wrote.

Prescriptions for antibiotics fell by 79%, they reported. 

“The data suggest that COVID-19 transmission mitigation strategies may help curb respiratory viral diseases beyond SARS-CoV-2 and, indirectly, decrease antibiotic prescribing,” they wrote.

 

11:13 a.m. ET, June 21, 2021

Maryland reports zero deaths from Covid-19 for the second day in a row

From CNN’s Jennifer Henderson

The state of Maryland is reporting zero deaths from Covid-19 for the second day in a row, Gov. Larry Hogan announced in a news release on Monday. 

According to Johns Hopkins University, Maryland has a seven-day average of three reported deaths and 68 new Covid-19 cases per day.

Maryland is also reporting a seven-day Covid-19 positivity rate of 0.66%, which is down 89% since mid-April, according to the release. 

There are currently 153 Covid-19 patients hospitalized statewide and 41 patients in the intensive care unit statewide which is nearing the lowest recorded level of people in the ICU of 40, the release adds.

Note: These numbers were released by the state's public health agency, and may not line up exactly in real time with CNN’s database drawn from Johns Hopkins University, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Department of Health and Human Services.

11:10 a.m. ET, June 21, 2021

Non-White children are at higher risk of negative outcomes from Covid-19, study says

From CNN’s Lauren Mascarenhas

Non-White children have a higher risk of negative Covid-19 outcomes, suggests research published in JAMA Pediatrics Monday.

The researchers used a nationally representative sample of 2,576,353 children ages zero to 18 in England to look into the relationship between race and Covid-19 outcomes among kids. Of the 410,726 children who were tested for Covid-19, 6.4% were positive.

About 17.1% of White children received a Covid-19 test, compared to 13.6% of Asian children, 8.3% of Black children and 12.9% of children of mixed or other races.

Although White children were most likely to receive a Covid-19 test, non-White children were more likely to test positive, the researchers note.

They also found that Asian children were significantly more likely to be hospitalized and need the intensive care unit than White children. 

Black children and those of mixed or other races had comparable risk of being hospitalized. However, those who were admitted were more likely to be hospitalized for 36 hours or more, compared to white children.

“These results suggest that racial minority children may have a more severe course of COVID-19,” the researchers wrote.

They also noted that additional research is needed to explore the risk around MIS-C and longer-term outcomes of coronavirus.

In a related editorial also published in JAMA Pediatrics Monday, pediatricians with Boston Children’s Hospital say a targeted approach is needed to respond to these inequities.

“If future initiatives do not prioritize equity over equality by distributing resources based on relative need and ensuring that children from communities most severely impacted by COVID-19 are given preference, we run the risk of perpetuating existing disparities for generations to come,” the authors wrote.

11:01 a.m. ET, June 21, 2021

Vaccinated in Louisiana? You could win a million dollars.

From CNN's Tina Burnside 

Louisiana residents who received at least one Covid-19 vaccine can register to win one million dollars as part of the state's "Shot at a Million" campaign, Gov. John Bel Edwards’ office announced. 

The campaign is part of the state's efforts to reward residents who get their Covid-19 vaccine.

Fourteen vaccinated residents will win scholarships and cash prizes throughout the month of July, and one adult will win $1 million.

Who can enter to win?

  • Louisianans who have taken at least one dose of the Covid-19 vaccine qualify.
  • They must be age 18 or older to enter to win one of four $100,000 prizes and the grand prize of $1 million.
  • Louisianan teens between the ages of 12 and 17 who have taken at least one dose of the Covid-19 vaccine may enter to win one of nine $100,000 scholarships.
  • There are four weekly drawings for a $100,000 scholarship and $100,000 cash prize.
  • The final grand prize drawing on August 4 will award a $1 million cash and five people will win a $100,000 scholarship.
  • Overall awards will total $2.3 million, paid using federal Covid-19 outreach dollars.

Residents can register online at ShotAtAMillion.com or call the toll-free hotline at 877-356-1511

10:45 a.m. ET, June 21, 2021

Cuba records largest single-day increase in Covid-19 cases

From CNN’s Patrick Oppmann in Havana

Cuba announced 1,561 new cases of Covid-19 on Monday, the highest single-day increase since the start of the pandemic.

Health officials also announced 11 new Covid-19 related deaths for a total of 1,170 fatalities.

Cuban officials are widely administering the Cuban-made vaccine candidates, and as of Monday, they say they have given more than four million doses on the island.

Cuban officials say one of the vaccine candidates registered an efficacy of 62% but have yet to share more details of their testing.

10:13 a.m. ET, June 21, 2021

60% of adults in Virginia are fully vaccinated, governor says

From CNN’s Jennifer Henderson

Sean Alexander Bailey, right, gets a Covid-19 vaccination from his mother in law, Tish Dorman, as as his daughter Ella and son Charlie react at an old TJ Maxx store used by Lynchburg fire Department as a mass Covid-19 vaccination site in Lynchburg, Virginia, on March 13.
Sean Alexander Bailey, right, gets a Covid-19 vaccination from his mother in law, Tish Dorman, as as his daughter Ella and son Charlie react at an old TJ Maxx store used by Lynchburg fire Department as a mass Covid-19 vaccination site in Lynchburg, Virginia, on March 13. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

At least 70% of adults in the Commonwealth of Virginia have received at least one Covid-19 shot, and 60% of adults are fully vaccinated, Gov. Ralph Northam announced in a press briefing Monday.

Northam added that Covid-19 case numbers, hospitalizations, and deaths from Covid-19 are the lowest they have been since the “early days of the pandemic” and the percent positivity is less than 1.5%.

10:09 a.m. ET, June 21, 2021

Biden administration considers ending pandemic-related border policy by end of next month

From CNN's Priscilla Alvarez

A pair of migrant families from Brazil pass through a gap in the border wall to reach the United States after crossing from Mexico to Yuma, Arizona, to seek asylum on June 10.
A pair of migrant families from Brazil pass through a gap in the border wall to reach the United States after crossing from Mexico to Yuma, Arizona, to seek asylum on June 10. Eugene Garcia/AP

The Biden administration is considering ending a public health order that’s allowed border authorities to turn back thousands of migrants in a phased approach by the end of July, CNN has learned. 

The administration has been facing fierce criticism for relying on a public health authority, known as Title 42, that was put in place under the Trump administration in early 2020 at the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. Since last October, US Border Patrol has expelled 648,185 migrants under the authority, according to agency data.

The policy allows border officials to expel migrants encountered at the US-Mexico border. Immigrant advocates claim it has put migrants in harm's way, leaving many, including those seeking asylum, in dangerous conditions in Mexico. In some cases, families have opted to separate from their children, since unaccompanied migrant children are not subject to the policy. 

Over recent weeks, the administration has coordinated with nongovernmental organizations to identify vulnerable migrant families in Mexico and allow them to enter the United States, instead of turning them away. It was among the first moves that appeared aimed at gradually easing the Trump-era policy. 

The Department of Homeland Security did not immediately respond to a CNN request for comment.

 Axios first reported the Biden administration was considering ending the policy as early as July 31, including that Biden was briefed on a plan for stopping family expulsions.

The Trump-era public health order remains the subject of litigation. Since February, plaintiffs in a case concerning families being subject to the order have been in negotiations with the government. Last Friday, the pause on litigation was extended until July 2.