Earthquake rocks Southern California

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5:27 a.m. ET, July 6, 2019

Southern California braced for more aftershocks

Preliminary estimates show there is a 10% chance of a further magnitude 7 or higher earthquake, according to Lucy Jones, a Seismologist with Caltech.

At an overnight news conference, Jones said aftershocks will continue.

She said the earthquakes that struck near Ridgecrest on Thursday and Friday were part of an ongoing sequence of a "very energetic system," Jones said.

The latest 7.1-magnitude earthquake was the mainshock, while Thursday's 6.4-magnitude quake was a foreshock, according to Jones.

Seismologist Lucy Jones speaks at a media briefing at the Caltech Seismological Laboratory in Pasadena, California.
Seismologist Lucy Jones speaks at a media briefing at the Caltech Seismological Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Photo: Robyn Beck / AFP

Officials have also warned about the possibilities of more earthquakes. California Gov. Gavin Newsom said he's activated the state emergency operation center to its highest level.

"The state is coordinating mutual aid to local first responders," he tweeted Friday night.

5:24 a.m. ET, July 6, 2019

Here's how to stay safe during earthquake

CNN's Scottie Andrew has this guide on how to stay safe before, during and after earthquake, according to the Department of Homeland SecurityEarthquake Country Alliance and Red Cross:

Drop, cover and hold on: Try to avoid moving too much; if the quake is severe, it'll likely knock you to the ground.

Avoid windows: Flying objects could break through the glass and cause harm, so keep away.

Stay where you are: If you're in bed, stay there, but cover your face and neck with a pillow. If you're inside, don't run outside -- parts of the building's exterior could fall from overhead. If you're driving, stop your vehicle in an area clear of trees, buildings, overpasses or wires.

Don't take the elevator: Even if the power isn't out, the elevator could stop working if quakes continue. It's best to stay put, then take the stairs when it's safe to move.

A home in Ridgecrest caught fire following a 6.4 magnitude earthquake on Thursday.
A home in Ridgecrest caught fire following a 6.4 magnitude earthquake on Thursday. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

4:36 a.m. ET, July 6, 2019

How earthquakes are measured

The two earthquakes in Southern California were the strongest to hit the area in decades.

The 7.1-magnitude quake on Friday was five times bigger than Thursday's, but released 11 times the amount of energy than the 6.4 shake on Thursday, CNN Meteorologist Brandon Miller said.

State Route 178 in Kern County was closed due to rock slide.
State Route 178 in Kern County was closed due to rock slide. Photo: CHP Bakersfield

Earthquakes are measured using seismographs, which monitor the seismic waves that travel through the Earth after an earthquake strikes, CNN's Emily Smith writes.

4:22 a.m. ET, July 6, 2019

Where the earthquake struck

The latest earthquake struck 11 miles northeast of Ridgecrest, according to the US Geological Survey.

It was the second quake to hit the area in just two days, following Thursday's 6.4-magnitude earthquake that was also centered near Ridgecrest.

4:46 a.m. ET, July 6, 2019

Some Ridgecrest residents are sleeping outside

Ridgecrest Mayor Peggy Breeden said many of the city's residents are sleeping outside following the second powerful earthquake to hit their city in just two days.

"Many of them have experienced something that is very traumatic, somewhat unknown to most of them and many of them are sleeping outside tonight," she said.

They are fearful to be in their homes and we are offering any services as noted earlier -- we have places for people to shelter here, but many are choosing to just be with their neighbors in their sidewalks and driveways and some of them are in the streets," she added.

The leaders of the region's emergency services are coordinating aid and regional in the Ridgecrest area.
The leaders of the region's emergency services are coordinating aid and regional in the Ridgecrest area. Photo: CA Governor's Office of Emergency Services

Megan Person, Director of Countywide Communications for the Bakersfield Emergency Operation Center, said 129 residents are currently sheltering at the Kerr McGee Community Center in Ridgecrest.

3:54 a.m. ET, July 6, 2019

"Everything was rocking and swaying"

CNN's Paul Vercammen describes the scene following the 7.1-magnitude earthquake in Southern California.

The quake was the second to strike near the city of Ridgecrest in less than two days. It was stronger and lasted longer than Thursday's 6.4 -magnitude earthquake.

3:53 a.m. ET, July 6, 2019

Thousands are without power

At least 3,300 customers are without power in three counties in Southern California, according to Southern California Edison spokeswoman Sally Jeun. 

Jeun said 2,300 are cut off power in Kern County, 900 in San Bernardino Country and 100 in Inyo County.

3:38 a.m. ET, July 6, 2019

Water spills out of a pool

From CNN's Christina Maxouris, Sarah Moon and Sheena Jones

Bakersfield resident Giovanna Gomez was at home with her family when their house swayed and the water in her pool overflowed. They ran outside.

"It was about a minute long," she said. "Far larger than the one that (happened) yesterday. It was a smooth roll going back and forth."

Bakersfield is in Kern County about 110 miles from Ridgecrest.

3:34 a.m. ET, July 6, 2019

Fires break out following quake

Multiple fires broke out after the earthquake Friday, according to Kern County spokeswoman Megan Person.

A fire broke out at the Casa Corona restaurant in Ridgecrest following the earthquake.
A fire broke out at the Casa Corona restaurant in Ridgecrest following the earthquake. Photo: Jessica Weston/AP

Mark Ghilarducci, Director of California Governors’ Office of Emergency Management, said Ridgecrest has had significant reports of structural fires due to gas leaks throughout the city.