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September 24 Breonna Taylor news

Video shows vigilantes clash with protesters
02:28
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Our live coverage of the Breonna Taylor protests has ended for the day. Read a wrap of Thursday’s events here.

LeBron James: "We lost a beautiful woman in Breonna"

Turner Sports Reporter Allie LaForce interviews LeBron James #23 of the Los Angeles Lakers after a game against the Denver Nuggets during Game 4 of the Western Conference Finals on September 24, in Orlando, Florida at the AdventHealth Arena. 

Speaking after Game 4 of the Western Conference finals on Thursday, LeBron James was asked about Breonna Taylor and how emotional the past 24 hours have been.

“Very heavy,” James said. “The emotions are very high. I mean, we have a teammate on our team that’s from Louisville … As heavy as it’s been on us, it’s even heavier on him because that’s his hometown.”

“I mean, I got a daughter of mine at home and a wife and my mom, so many predominant Black women in my life. To think about if they weren’t here the next day or think if they were gunned down, it would be something I would never be able to forgive myself or forgive who did it.”

James added that, “we’re here playing this game and it’s very challenging on us, it’s very difficult, but at the same time our hearts are with that family, with that city.”

“It’s just so unjust what’s going on,” the NBA star said. “Sorry to be so longwinded. It’s a tragedy. We just hope that there’s better days, you know. And you hope for better days and you spread love and not hate, because that’s what it all boils down to.”

Two reporters arrested and held overnight while covering Louisville protests

Two journalists with The Daily Caller, a conservative online news outlet based in Washington, DC, were arrested late Wednesday night while covering the protests in Kentucky, one of the reporters told CNN Thursday.

Daily Caller reporters Jorge Ventura and Shelby Talcott were trailing a group of protesters after the 9 p.m. ET curfew when officers from the Louisville Metro Police Department allegedly began firing rubber bullets at the crowd, Ventura said.

Soon after, they and Kentucky State Police ordered everyone in the protest to get down on the ground, Ventura said. He added that he and Talcott showed the officers their press credentials and Talcott began communicating with their editor-in-chief, Geoffrey Ingersoll, before they were arrested with zip ties.

Ventura said the protest was outside the jail where they were eventually held. Soon after arriving, Ventura said one of the superior officers came in from another room asking him to confirm his identity and press affiliation, which Ventura said he did. The officer then told Ventura he was going to go speak to his editor – who was on the line – about the situation, but when the officer came back, Ventura said he was told he would still be charged and held overnight.

Charging documents obtained by CNN show that Ventura was officially charged with failing to obey a local county ordinance and failure to disperse, both of which are misdemeanors, according to what Ventura was told.

Ventura said he and Talcott were eventually separated into adjacent male and female holding cells, and they could only communicate by eye contact.

Ventura said he was told he would be released “no later than 6:30 in the morning,” Thursday but says he wasn’t out until 1 p.m., and still among the first of those detained to leave. He said he was detained in a holding cell with around 40 protesters, with social distancing protocols not followed.

Talcott tweeted Thursday evening that she had been released, which Ventura said happened at around 5 p.m.

“I still can’t make sense of (it),” he said. “After speaking with my boss, I think they could’ve done a little bit more. It just doesn’t really make sense to talk to my boss once he knew we were accredited journalists. Why even take the phone call then?”

CNN has reached out to the LMPD for comment.

Attorney for Breonna Taylor's neighbors says they have mixed emotions on AG’s announcement

In this handout photo provided by the Shelby County Detention Center, former Louisville Police detective Brett Hankison poses on September 23, in Louisville, Kentucky.

A lawyer representing neighbors of Breonna Taylor said his clients were “extremely happy” with the charges against former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison.

“They’re very happy he was indicted for shooting their apartment, and disappointed the other officers aren’t being held accountable for the actions they took that night,” attorney Brandon Lawrence told CNN.

Hankison was charged with three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment for shooting 10 rounds “wantonly and blindly” into Taylor’s apartment.

Some bullets broke through to an apartment next door, where Chelsey Napper, her young son, and partner Cody Etherton lived, Lawrence said.

Lawrence said that while his clients were “very happy he was indicted for shooting their apartment,” they thought Taylor had not “received the justice that she was due.”

Attorney for Taylor family says Attorney General's investigation is a "cover-up"

Ben Crump, civil rights attorney, speaks at a news conference at City Hall on September 15, in Louisville, Kentucky.

Benjamin Crump, the attorney for Breonna Taylor’s family, says he believes the Kentucky Attorney General’s investigation into her death was a cover-up.

Crump said this after citing what he says were lies from the Louisville Metro Police Department investigation right after Taylor’s death

“They release a three-page police report, Anderson, that was filled with lies saying there were no signs of forced entry, when we know they busted open the door.” Crump added, “Then they had the audacity to say there were no injuries, yet Breonna was executed there in the hallway of her apartment.”

CNN has previously reported that officers used a battering ram to break down Taylor’s door.

“The fact that if he didn’t put the context about the probable cause affidavit that show this was based on a lie in the first place, saying that the United States Postal Inspector said Breonna was getting packages delivered to her house and the United States Postal Inspector said ‘we never made that statement, there were no packages delivered to Breonna Taylor’s house.’ So if that wasn’t communicated in that grand jury proceeding, how isn’t that a cover-up?”

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said in a news conference Wednesday that his investigation did not include how the warrant was obtained, although that information could be used in the current FBI investigation into Taylor’s killing.

Although Crump said that the family was told about 10 minutes before the decision was announced publicly, two local attorneys who were with the family – Lonita Baker and Sam Aguiar – say it was even shorter, closer to two minutes, despite their understanding that the AG would inform them of the Grand Jury’s decision well before any public announcement.

WNBA players release statement on Breonna Taylor decision

Napheesa Collier of the Minnesota Lynx gives a speech before Game 2 of the semifinals of the 2020 WNBA Playoffs on September 24, at the Feld Entertainment Center in Palmetto, Florida.

Ahead of Game 2 of the WNBA semifinals between the Minnesota Lynx and Seattle Storm on Thursday, Napheesa Collier of the Lynx read a statement on behalf of WNBA players regarding the decision made on Breonna Taylor’s case.

“Our hearts are with Ms. Tamika Palmer,” Collier said. “It has been 195 days since her daughter Breonna Taylor was killed. One hundred and ninety-five days and still today no one was charged for her death.
We strongly support the sentiment expressed by the family of Breonna Taylor. The result is outrageous and offensive. No needs to live in the Commonwealth of Kentucky to understand this case. We won’t stop pressing for full transparency and full and complete justice. There are far too many questions left unanswered. Justice is on the ballot. Please register today and vote on or before November 3. Thank you.”

The Storm went on to win the game 89-79 and have a 2-0 lead in the best-of-five series.

Louisville police declare unlawful assembly "due to protesters breaking windows"

A police officer observes protesters, Thursday, September 24, in Louisville, Kentucky.

The Louisville Metro Police Department declared an unlawful assembly downtown Thursday night.

It is the second night of demonstrations following a grand jury’s decision not to charge any officers in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor.

The department tweeted that the declaration was made “due to protesters breaking windows” on Fourth Street.

A citywide curfew is in effect from 9 p.m. ET to 6:30 a.m. ET.

Protests continue for a second night in Louisville

Protesters march through Louisville, Kentucky, on Thursday, September 24.

Protesters marched through Louisville for a second night and demanded justice for Breonna Taylor after a grand jury declined to charge three officers with her killing.

At one point, dozens of demonstrators in Louisville veered off the march route and confronted a group of people dressed in military-style outfits and carrying rifles.

The protesters chanted “Black lives matter” and “No justice, no peace” as they ringed the group.

Other members of the march eventually called the demonstrators back to the protest.

What you need to know: More than six months after Taylor was shot to death after Louisville police officers broke down the door to her apartment while executing a warrant, a grand jury decided to indict only one of the three officers involved on first-degree wanton endangerment charges. The charge applies to the risk put on Taylor’s neighbors but does not aim to hold the officer responsible for her death.

Now, Taylor’s family wants Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron to release transcripts of the grand jury proceedings, according to family attorney Ben Crump.

Crump told CNN’s Anderson Cooper tonight that they are “demanding that the transcripts of the grand jury proceedings be released so we can see if Breonna’s voice was ever put forth before that grand jury.”

Watch:

02:12

Missouri governor signs order activating National Guard "as a precautionary measure"

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson has signed an executive order activating the state’s National Guard “as a precautionary measure in response to recent instances of civil unrest across the country,” the governor’s office said in a news release Thursday.

“The National Guard, as well as the Missouri State Highway Patrol, stands ready to assist local law enforcement if necessary,” the release said. 

“We fully support the right of citizens to peacefully protest and are committed to protecting that right. At this time, we are taking a proactive approach in the event that assistance is needed to support local law enforcement in protecting Missouri and its people,” Parson said in the release.

Protesters are marching through New York City tonight

People listen to a speaker at a Black Lives Matters protest in a park in Brooklyn on September 24, in New York City.

Several hundred protesters marched through New York City tonight and chanted Breonna Taylor’s name.

Protesters carried banners and other signs with demands to defund police.

Taylor was shot to death after Louisville police officers broke down the door to her apartment while executing a warrant.

A grand jury decided to indict only one of the three officers involved on first-degree wanton endangerment charges. The charge applies to the risk put on Taylor’s neighbors but does not aim to hold the officer responsible for her death.  

Louisville mayor extends curfew through weekend

Kentucky Army National Guard soldiers stand guard during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky, on Thursday, September 24.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer extended the citywide curfew through the weekend, his office announced Thursday evening.

The curfew will continue to run from 9 p.m. ET to 6:30 a.m. ET.

“As the city continues its work to balance people’s First Amendment rights to peacefully protest with the duty to protect public safety, Mayor Greg Fischer said today that he is extending the countywide curfew through the weekend,” the statement said.

These government buildings will be closed until Monday:

  • Metro Hall and its annex
  • City Hall and its annex
  • Fiscal Court
  • The Sinking Fund
  • Louisville Metro Police Department headquarters
  • Metro Development and Metro Safe on South Fifth Street
  • Youth Detention Services
  • The Alexander Building on West Main
  • The Downtown Wellness Center on First Street 

Massachusetts governor signs order activating National Guard if needed

Massachusetts Gov. Charles Baker speaks during a press conference in Boston on September 24.

Massachusetts Gov. Charles Baker signed an order Thursday activating members of his state’s National Guard Thursday ahead of any potential protests in the commonwealth.  

He approved up to 1,000 members of the Massachusetts National guard “to provide necessary assistance to State and local civilian authorities and/or special duty and emergency assistance for the preservation of live and property, preservation of order, and to afford protection to persons.”  

That number does not necessarily reflect the number of personnel who could be deployed at any given time, according to Jake Wark, the director of communications for the Executive Office of Public Safety & Security. 

Baker signed a similar order in late August but no municipal leaders utilized the guard and the order was canceled several days later.

Officer indicted in Breonna Taylor case plans to plead not guilty, his attorney says

Former Louisville Metro Police Det. Brett Hankison was released from jail Wednesday after surrendering to authorities and posting bond, his attorney Stew Matthews told CNN.

Former Det. Brett Hankison, the officer indicted on first-degree wanton endangerment charges in the Breonna Taylor case, intends to plead not guilty when he is arraigned, his attorney, Stew Matthews, told CNN.

Evidence in the case does not support the charges against his client, he added. The charge applies to the risk put on Taylor’s neighbors but does not aim to hold the officer responsible for her death.

Hankison was booked Wednesday in the Shelby County Jail, posted a $15,000 bond and was released, Matthews said.

The long-anticipated announcement Wednesday was met by outrage and heartbreak from activists and community members, not only in Louisville but nationwide.

Taylor, a 26-year-old Black emergency room technician and aspiring nurse, was described by relatives as a hard-working, goal-oriented young woman who put an emphasis on family. Crump called demonstrations over her death “righteous anger.”

Louisville is working to release some information related to the Breonna Taylor investigation, mayor says

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer speaks during a press conference on Thursday, September 24.

The city of Louisville is working with Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s office and the FBI to “determine what we can release so it doesn’t interfere with any of the ongoing investigations,” Mayor Greg Fischer said in a news conference Thursday morning.

Fischer was responding to a reporter question about any plans by the mayor’s office to release information related to Breonna Taylor investigation now that the grand jury has reported its findings into the Jefferson County Circuit Court.

“What we want to do is get as much of this information out as soon as we can. There does need to be some redaction of names to protect individuals’ identities in some of these cases, so that process has started and we hope to be able to announce further information on that soon,” he said.

Some background: In an interview with CNN this morning, Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear reiterated his call for Cameron to publicly release details regarding the grand jury’s examination of the Taylor case.

Watch Gov Beshear with Jim Sciutto:

Louisville police officers shot during protests expected to recover, chief says

Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Robert Schroeder speaks during a press conference on Thursday, September 24.

Officer Robinson Desroches and Major Aubrey Gregory — the two Louisville Metro Police Department officers shot Wednesday evening during protests over the Breonna Taylor case — are expected to recover from their injuries, Mayor Greg Fischer and LMPD Chief Robert Schroeder said in a press conference Thursday morning.

Gregory, who joined the LMPD in 1999, is a commander of the police department’s special operations division and was leading efforts on the ground Wednesday evening, Schroder said. He was treated in hospital and released for a gunshot wound to hip.

He has done a “tremendous job the past several months as one of the leaders of our protest efforts. In fact, some say he may the bedrock of our protest efforts,” the police chief said. 

Desroches joined the LMPD in March 2019 and had to undergo surgery after being shot in the abdomen Wednesday. 

“We are extremely fortunate that these two officers will recover,” Schroeder said.

Evidence against indicted officer does not support charges, attorney says

The attorney for former Louisville police detective Brett Hankison tells CNN the evidence in the case does not support the charges against his client.

Hankison was indicted by a grand jury on Wednesday on three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment. The counts pertain to Hankison allegedly firing blindly into Breonna Taylor’s apartment through a door and window on March 13, with bullets entering an adjacent apartment and endangering those inside.

Attorney Stew Matthews told CNN his client plans to plead “not guilty” to the charges at his arraignment.

The other two officers who also fired shots during the botched March raid were not indicted, meaning no officer was charged with killing the 26-year-old Black emergency room technician and aspiring nurse.

Hankison surrendered on Wednesday afternoon, posted a $15,000 bond and was released, Matthews said. 

It is not immediately known when Hankison will make his first court appearance.

Matthews is no stranger to high-profile cases that involve police officers. He defended former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing, who fatally shot a Black man during a traffic stop in 2015. 

After two mistrials in the Tensing case, prosecutors dismissed the murder indictment saying “there is not a likelihood of success at (a third) trial.

Louisville police shooting suspect charged with assault and wanton endangerment of an officer

26-year-old Larynzo Johnson has been arrested in connection with the shooting of two Louisville Metro Police Department officers, the Louisville Metropolitan Department of Corrections confirmed to CNN.

He has been charged with two counts of first degree assault of an officer and 14 counts of wanton endangerment of a police officer.

Johnson will be arraigned at 10a Friday.

CNN has been unsuccessful in identifying his legal representatives.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and LMPD Chief Robert Schroeder are expected to address the arrest in a press conference Thursday morning.

Kentucky attorney general should post Taylor's case details online for public to read, governor says

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear speaks with CNN on Thursday, September 24.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear told CNN he has asked the state’s Attorney General Daniel Cameron to post the details of the investigation and the grand jury proceedings online for the public to “see the facts themselves.”

“The challenge here is that the facts and the evidence have not been shared with the public. I trust the people of Kentucky with the truth. But they need to be able to see the truth, read the evidence, look over what grand jury may have seen or the investigators or the attorney general looked at,” he said.

More than six months after Taylor was shot to death when Louisville police officers broke down the door to her apartment while executing a warrant, a grand jury decided to indict one of the three officers involved on first-degree wanton endangerment charges. The charge applies to the risk put on Taylor’s neighbors but does not aim to hold the officer responsible for her death.

Following the verdict, outrage boiled over into protests in cities across the US. Two officers were shot during the protests in Louisville, Kentucky.

Beshear said he spoke to one of the officers, who he said had a “very good” prognosis and was in good spirits, he told CNN. 

Watch more:

Mitch McConnell: "Peaceful protests honor the memory of Breonna Taylor"

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s statement on Breonna Taylor and protests that broke out overnight in Louisville.

McConnell, a Republican from Kentucky, said this:

“Many Kentuckians have channeled their continuing grief and anger into a peaceful exercise of their First Amendment rights. But in Louisville last night, we saw more of the lawlessness, riots, and violence that has plagued American cities too often this year.”

“Peaceful protests honor the memory of Breonna Taylor. Peaceful protests move us toward justice,” the statement added.

Kentucky attorney general "failed," Breonna Taylor's mother's attorney says 

Lonita Baker, the attorney for Breonna Taylor’s mother, speaks during an interview on September 24.

Lonita Baker, the attorney for Breonna Taylor’s mother, said the grand jury’s result “does not make legal sense.”

“I’ve been a prosecutor, I’ve been a criminal defense attorney, and I have to question whether Attorney General Daniel Cameron actually even presented any questions as it relates to the murder of Breonna Taylor to the grand jury for the grand jury to make the determination or if his office unilaterally made that decision,” Baker said.

Baker also noted that officer Brett Hankison’s indictment was related to endangering the three White neighbors, not for endangering the Black neighbors upstairs or for killing Taylor, who is also Black. 

“Daniel Cameron failed. He needs to learn the law of self-defense in Kentucky, because as he stated it yesterday, he was off base,” she said. “One shot that Kenny Walker fired does not justify 32 shots being fired blindly into Breonna’s apartment without target acquisition.” 

Baker also said that it was “truly disheartening to see” that Cameron “did not even have the courage” to tell Taylor’s mom, Tamika Palmer, that the three counts did not relate to her daughter’s death.

You might hear the term wanton endangerment a lot today. Here's what you need to know.

grand jury indicted former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison on three counts of wanton endangerment in the first degree in connection with the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor in March.

The charges drew immediate criticism from demonstrators who wanted more serious charges, as well as the arrests of the three officers involved.

Here’s why: The charge applies to the risk put on Taylor’s neighbors during the police raid on her home but does not hold the officer responsible for her death. 

Hankison is not charged with causing the death of Taylor. Rather, the police department said, he “wantonly and blindly” fired into her apartment — shooting 10 rounds.

The charge is a Class D felony, the lowest of four classes of felonies. The maximum sentence is five years; the minimum is one year.

If convicted, Hankison faces five years imprisonment for each count, Attorney General Daniel Cameron said at a news conference Wednesday. A Class A felony — for example, a murder charge — carries a sentence of up to 50 years or life, and a minimum sentence of 20 years.

Attorney General did not tell Taylor's mother that charges were not in relation to her death, attorney says

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron speaks during a press conference in Frankfort, Kentucky on September 23, following the return of a grand jury investigation into the death of Breonna Taylor.

Attorney General Daniel Cameron didn’t tell Breonna Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer, the wanton endangerment charges weren’t in relation to Taylor, family attorney Sam Aguiar told CNN.

CNN has reached out to the attorney general’s office for comment.

The charge applies to the risk put on Taylor’s neighbors during the police raid on her home, but does not hold the officer responsible for her death. First-degree wanton endangerment is a Class D felony, the lowest of four classes of felonies. The maximum sentence is five years; the minimum is one year.

Aguiar said Wednesday that Palmer learned about the results of the grand jury indictment just two minutes before Cameron made his announcement, even after It was expected the family would have a heads-up on the decision.

“She had to drive all the way down there to be told this, despite two advanced requests from me to not force her to drive down only to learn no indictments,” Aguiar said. “I told them that would be hell for her.”  

Family of Breonna Taylor wants grand jury transcript released, attorney says

Ben Crump, attorney for Breonna Taylor’s family, said that the family is “devastated” and “outraged” after a grand jury indicted a former Louisville police officer on three counts of wanton endangerment in the first degree in connection with her fatal shooting.

No officer was charged directly with Taylor’s death.

“Right now, it appears to many people that this was a sham proceeding, that there was an attempt to exonerate these officers more so than to hold them accountable,” Crump said on CNN’s “New Day.” 

Crump said Kentucky Attorney General David Cameron called Taylor’s family about 10 minutes before his public announcement.

The family wants Cameron to release the transcript of the grand jury proceedings to the public, according to Crump.

Crump said that he and two other attorneys for the family spoke with 12 neighbors who say they didn’t hear police announce themselves before they broke down the door to her apartment while executing a warrant. Those 12 neighbors were “apparently not” presented to the grand jury, he said.

The FBI is investigating to see if there were civil rights violations that occurred against Breonna Taylor next, according to Crump.

Yesterday’s announcement sparked protests in numerous cities across the US.

“Our legal system is trying to tell us it was justified and it is OK. Well, it is not OK. Black women’s lives matter and Breonna Taylor’s life matters,” Crump said. 

Watch more:

It's morning in Louisville. Here's what you need to know about the overnight protests.

Protests took place across the US following Wednesday’s indictment in the Breonna Taylor case.

If you’re just reading ion now, here’s what you need to know:

  • The indictment: Only one of the three officers involved in Taylor’s death was indicted on first-degree wanton endangerment charges. The other two officers who also fired shots during the botched March raid were not indicted, meaning no officer was charged with killing Taylor.
  • How her family is reacting: Attorney Ben Crump, who represents Taylor’s family, called the indictment “outrageous and offensive.” The NAACP also said the justice system “failed” Taylor and the charges against one officer do “not go far enough.” Tamika Palmer, Taylor’s mother, was surrounded by her youngest daughter, sister, and attorneys when she learned that only one officer would be indicted for wanton endangerment.
  • Protests across the nation: Demonstrators and activists immediately criticized the charges against the former detective, Brett Hankison. Protesters marched today in several US cities including New York, Chicago, Washington DC, Louisville, Nashville, Las Vegas, Atlanta and Philadelphia.
  • Clashes with police: In some cities, the protests have escalated into clashes with law enforcement; two officers were shot in Louisville, and police fired tear gas at protesters in Atlanta. Portland Police declared a riot after protestors threw molotov cocktails, rocks, broke windows and lit fires, according to a press release from the police department.
  • Political reaction: Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden tweeted that violence should not be the answer “even amidst the profound grief & anger today’s decision.” His running mate Kamala Harris called for reforms to the justice system in a tweet. “We must never stop speaking Breonna’s name as we work to reform our justice system, including overhauling no-knock warrants,” she wrote.

GO DEEPER

Outrage over lack of charges in Breonna Taylor's death turns into protests across the US
These are the people at the center of the Breonna Taylor case
Weeping resounded from the room where Breonna Taylor's mother learned the grand jury's decision
Athletes express disappointment over Breonna Taylor decision
Wanton endangerment charge: What it means in the Breonna Taylor case

GO DEEPER

Outrage over lack of charges in Breonna Taylor's death turns into protests across the US
These are the people at the center of the Breonna Taylor case
Weeping resounded from the room where Breonna Taylor's mother learned the grand jury's decision
Athletes express disappointment over Breonna Taylor decision
Wanton endangerment charge: What it means in the Breonna Taylor case