Live Updates

September 23 Breonna Taylor news

Protests around country after Breonna Taylor announcement
01:51

What you need to know

  • One of the three officers involved in Breonna Taylor’s case was indicted on first-degree wanton endangerment charges.
  • Taylor, an EMT, was killed in her own home when three plainclothes Louisville police officers executed a “no-knock” warrant. No officers were charged directly with her death.
  • Protesters took to the streets in several US cities after today’s announcement. Louisville police said two officers have been shot and a suspect is in custody.
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Our live coverage of the protests following the announcement in the Breonna Taylor case has moved here,

There were close to 100 arrests in Louisville overnight, say police

The shadow of a police officer arresting a demonstrator against a wall in Louisville, Kentucky, on Wednesday.

The Louisville Police Department says it is still tallying arrest numbers from unrest across the city last night following Wednesday’s indictment announcement. However, the department believes the arrest count will be close to 100, Sgt. Lamont Washington said in a Thursday morning press release.

Police said protesters moved road barricades and began letting traffic into restricted areas, jumped on police cars and set garbage cans on fire. Two officers were injured by gunfire when protestors marched in the area of Brook and College, according to the release. 

In addition to arrests and unlawful assembly violations, police say businesses were looted including two City Gear stores and a pawn shop. Police expect to release additional information on looting locations today, the release added.

It's just past 7:30 a.m. on the East Coast. Here's a catch up on what happened overnight:

Protests took place across the US after Wednesday’s indictment in the Breonna Taylor case. Here’s what you need to know:

The indictment: Only one of the three officers involved in Taylor’s death was indicted on first-degree wanton endangerment charges.

The other two officers who also fired shots during the botched March raid were not indicted, meaning no officer was charged with killing Taylor.

The public reaction: Demonstrators and activists immediately criticized the charges against the former detective, Brett Hankison.

Attorney Ben Crump, who represents Taylor’s family, called the indictment “outrageous and offensive.” The NAACP also said the justice system “failed” Taylor and the charges against one officer do “not go far enough.”

Tamika Palmer, Taylor’s mother, was surrounded by her youngest daughter, sister, and attorneys when she learned that only one officer would be indicted for wanton endangerment.

There was “a lot of sadness and weeping,” said Christopher 2X, a community activist who is assisting Palmer and who stood outside the room when Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced the decision.

Athletes including LeBron James, Danny Green, Megan Rapinoe and Kayla McBride expressed their disappointment with the grand jury’s decision.

Jarrett Hill, a politics and pop culture journalist, told CNN that the indictment only confirmed that “the system is not working for us.”

“I think the message to the people across this country is we don’t care about you, especially if you are Black, and even more if you are women,” he said. 

The protests: Protesters marched today in several US cities including New York, Chicago, Washington DC, Louisville, Nashville, Las Vegas, Atlanta and Philadelphia.

In some cities, the protests have escalated into clashes with law enforcement; two officers were shot in Louisville, and police fired tear gas at protesters in Atlanta.

Portland Police declared a riot after protestors threw molotov cocktails, rocks, broke windows and lit fires, according to a press release from the police department.

Political reaction: Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden tweeted that violence should not be the answer “even amidst the profound grief & anger today’s decision.”

His running mate Kamala Harris called for reforms to the justice system in a tweet. “We must never stop speaking Breonna’s name as we work to reform our justice system, including overhauling no-knock warrants,” she wrote.

Charles Ramsey, the former Philadelphia police commissioner and former Washington DC, police chief, told CNN that he agreed with the grand jury’s decision.

“I do believe the one officer should have been charged – what he did was reckless and certainly criminal. The other two officers, however, that were actually making entry into the apartment, I agree they should not have been charged criminally,” Ramsey told CNN.

13 people were arrested in Seattle during Wednesday night's protests

The Seattle Police Department has released imagery and information on arrests made Wednesday night.

The Seattle Police Department has just released information on the number of arrests made during last night’s protests in the city. 

“In total, officers arrested 13 individuals for charges ranging from property destruction, resisting arrest and failure to disperse as well as assault on an officer,” the department said in a news release. 

Multiple officers sustained injuries, it added, including “one who was struck in the head with a baseball bat cracking his helmet.”

The police also acknowledged there is footage circulating of an officer’s bike rolling over the head of a person in the street. 

“In addition to this, the Seattle Police Department is aware of a video circulating on the internet that apparently shows an SPD bike officer’s bike rolling over the head of an individual laying in the street. This matter will be referred to the Office of Professional Accountability for further investigation.”

Seattle Police make more arrests as protests continue

The Seattle Police have made additional arrests early this morning as protesters continue their violence against authorities, according to the police department.  

“Commanders on scene have declared the ongoing protest an unlawful assembly after multiple fires have been set, explosives have been thrown at officers, and property damage in the surrounding area…,” the Seattle Police Department said in a tweet. 

“Protestors continue to throw rocks, bottles, and even a fire extinguisher at officers. Additional arrests have been made,” police continued in a post on Twitter

Former Philadelphia police commissioner defends grand jury indictment

Former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey speaks at an event at Parkway Northwest High School for Peace and Social Justice, in Philadelphia, Pennysylvania, on February 28, 2020.

Charles Ramsey, the former Philadelphia police commissioner and former Washington, DC, police chief, told CNN earlier tonight that he agreed with the grand jury’s decision not to charge a single officer with killing Breonna Taylor.

Only one of the officers involved in her death was indicted, on the charge of first-degree wanton endangerment.

“I do believe the one officer should have been charged – what he did was reckless and certainly criminal. The other two officers, however, that were actually making entry into the apartment, I agree they should not have been charged criminally,” Ramsey told CNN.

Ramsey said that although Taylor’s death was “unfortunate” and “tragic,” the other officers had been “justified in returning fire” because Taylor’s boyfriend had fired the first shot when the police entered her apartment using a no-knock warrant.

What happened that night: Taylor was sleeping next to her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker III, in the early hours of March 13, when they heard a noise. They both got up and walked to the door.

Police forced entry into the home, and Walker said he couldn’t see but he fired one shot. After entering, an officer was shot in the leg, Attorney General Daniel Cameron said earlier today.

Collectively, the three officers at the scene fired more than 30 rounds.

Journalist Jarrett Hill: The message of this indictment is, "We don't care about you"

Jarrett Hill attends the Black Women in Entertainment Celebration reception in Los Angeles, on February 27, 2019.

Jarrett Hill, a politics and pop culture journalist, told CNN earlier tonight that the indictment in Breonna Taylor’s case only confirmed that “the system is not working for us.”

“I think the message to the people across this country is we don’t care about you, especially if you are black, and even more if you are women,” he said. 

“People are not only upset. They are tired. We are burnt out. We are a country that have been through racial protest all throughout the year, but also Covid-19. We’ve dealt with a president who is a dumpster fire of stories every single day. And we see an election that is coming that does not look good for a lot of folks,” he added.

“All of those things combined, put together with this moment of how frustrated we are about the ways Breonna Taylor was treated by the Louisville police, I think it really creates a perfect storm of a lot of things.”

Portland police declare a riot as protesters stay on the streets

Portland Police declare a riot due to protesters in Porland, Oregon, on September 24.

It’s nearing midnight in Portland, Oregon, but protesters are still active on the streets, even as police urge them to disperse.

“To those who have gathered outside of the Justice Center to include Central Precinct: This gathering is still declared a riot. Southwest Naito Parkway to Southwest 14th Avenue from Southwest Columbia Street to Southwest Harvey Milk is closed,” the Portland Police tweeted. 
“Failure to adhere to this order may subject you to arrest, citation, or the use of crowd control agents including, but not limited to, impact weapons and/or OC munitions (Oleoresin Capsicum). Leave now.”

The police earlier said those associated with the gathering were part of an unlawful assembly.  

Seattle protesters throwing objects at police, eight arrested so far

Protesters clashed with police in Seattle, Washington, on September 23.

Protesters in Seattle, Washington, have started clashing with law enforcement, according to the Seattle Police Department. 

“Protestors are now throwing glass bottles at officers at 11/Pine St,” the police tweeted. “Protestors have begun throwing fireworks at the East Precinct nearly striking officers in the process. The bulk of the protestors are in the intersection at 11/Pine St.”

Police added that they had fired pepper spray after protesters cut security cameras at the East Precinct.

Eight people have been arrested so far, police said.

FBI is asking for the public's help in investigating shooting of two police officers

The FBI Louisville office is asking for the public’s help for information on those who were involved in the shooting of two police officers in Louisville, Kentucky tonight during the protests.

“FBI Louisville Is Seeking Information on Individuals Inciting Violence to Include the Shooting of Two Louisville Police Officers on September 23, 2020 During First Amendment-Protected Peaceful Demonstrations,” according to a post on the FBI’s site. 
“We are asking for the public’s help to submit any videos related to the shooting of two LMPD officers on September 23, 2020, at approximately 8:30 PM near Broadway and South Brook Street.”

It's getting late on the West Coast but protesters are still out

Protesters march in downtown Los Angeles during a demonstration held to demand justice for the death of Breonna Taylor after the results of a grand jury indictment of former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison in Los Angeles, California, on 23 September.

It’s just past 11:30 p.m. PT on the West Coast, but crowds of protesters are still marching after today’s news of the indictment in the Breonna Taylor case.

Protesters are marching in downtown Los Angeles, California, where some demonstrators blocked a police vehicle earlier tonight.

Protesters are also on the streets of Portland, Oregon, where they have gathered near the Justice Center.

People marched in cities across the United States Wednesday, including New York, Philadelphia, Louisville, and Nashville.

San Diego police declare unlawful assembly and order protesters to disperse

Police ordered hundreds of protesters to disperse from downtown San Diego tonight, after clashes between demonstrators and law enforcement.

“In response to acts of violence and vandalism, the protest in front of the SDPD Headquarters building (1401 Broadway) has now been declared an unlawful assembly,” the police department said in a statement. 

The police said demonstrators may be arrested if they do not disperse. Officers also said there are several routes allowing free movement out of the area.

There are also other protests happening across the West Coast, including in Los Angeles, California and Portland, Oregon.

There was "a lot of sadness and weeping" after grand jury decision, activists say

Tamika Palmer, Breonna Taylor’s mother, was surrounded by her youngest daughter, sister, and attorneys when she learned that only one officer would be indicted for wanton endangerment.

There was “a lot of sadness and weeping,” said Christopher 2X, a community activist who is assisting Palmer and who stood outside the room when Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced the decision.

“It saddens me to witness, again, a mother of a victim in such excruciating pain … But it was expected in regards to how things have evolved over time in the Louisville Metro community, they usually always end up like this when those families who are looking for justice don’t receive it.”

As Palmer wiped away her tears, she was embraced by her daughter Bianca Austin and attorney Lonita Baker, who attempted to comfort her.

Baker described it as a “tough” situation and said they were “just loving on each other as a family.”

“We didn’t fathom that it would be a situation where they would indict on charges against the neighbors and absolutely nothing on Breonna,” she said.

Kamala Harris: "We must never stop speaking Breonna's name"

Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris tweeted about Breonna Taylor on Wednesday night, after the grand jury indictment.

“We must never stop speaking Breonna’s name as we work to reform our justice system, including overhauling no-knock warrants.”

Joe Biden on the Louisville officers who were shot: "violence is & can never be the answer"

Former Vice President and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden has tweeted his thoughts on tonight’s protests and the shooting of two police officers in Louisville:

“Even amidst the profound grief & anger today’s decision generated, violence is never & can never be the answer. Those who engage in it must be held accountable. Jill & I are keeping the officers shot tonight in Louisville in our prayers. We wish them both a swift & full recovery.”

Opinion: Indictment doesn't even begin to bring justice for Breonna Taylor

Editor’s note: Laura Coates is a CNN senior legal analyst. She is a former assistant US attorney for the District of Columbia and trial attorney in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice. The views expressed in this commentary are her own.

After 195 days, no officer has been arrested or charged for killing Breonna Taylor.

Wednesday’s grand jury indictment of former Louisville Det. Brett Hankison hasn’t brought justice for the death of Breonna Taylor. Hankison was charged with first-degree wanton endangerment charges because, prosecutors say, bullets from his firearm entered a neighboring apartment where three residents were home. In truth, this has changed nothing.

Justice feels like the elusive carrot that is dangled but never caught.

Consider the fact that Hankison was charged for shooting in the manner that could have killed someone.

No officer has been charged for the fact that someone actually did die.

Here’s the apparent logic behind that decision: Sgt. John Mattingly, Det. Myles Cosgrove and now-fired Det. Hankison executed a warrant on Taylor’s residence. Her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, inside the home at the time, feared they were the victims of a home invasion when the officers banged on the door but, according to Walker, didn’t respond when Taylor asked “Who is it?” before breaking down the door.

As the front door was broken down, Walker fired one shot at the first person to enter the apartment, hitting Mattingly. Mattingly and Cosgrove, returning fire in the direction of Walker, shot six and 16 times respectively, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said. Hankison, meanwhile, indiscriminately and, according to interim Louisville Police chief Robert Schroeder, “blindly” fired 10 rounds into the apartment.

Collectively, the three officers fired more than 30 rounds. Cameron, citing medical evidence obtained by his team, said that six bullets struck Breonna Taylor, with one being fatal. Taylor was in the hallway with Walker when she was struck. Prosecutors could not determine who fired the fatal shot or if Hankinson ever shot Taylor, but ultimately concluded that Mattingly and Cosgrove were justified in their use of force and would not be charged in Taylor’s death. Hankison’s attorney has declined to comment.

Read the full opinion here:

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JUNE 05: Holding a picture of Breonna Taylor, the 26-year-old woman, was fatally shot by Louisville Metro Police Department as protesters march in downtown Brooklyn over the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis Police officer on June 05, 2020 in New York City. The white police officer, Derek Chauvin, has been charged with second-degree murder and the three other officers who participated in the arrest have been charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder. Floyd's death, the most recent in a series of deaths of African Americans at the hands of police, has set off days and nights of protests across the country. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Opinion: Indictment doesn't even begin to bring justice for Breonna Taylor

Athletes express disappointment over Breonna Taylor decision

LeBron James of the Los Angeles Lakers looks on during a game against the Denver Nuggets during Game Two of the Western Conference Finals of the NBA Playoffs at AdventHealth Arena in Orlando, Florida, on September 20.

Athletes – many of whom have used their platforms to take stances against police brutality over the past few months – expressed their disappointment Wednesday after a grand jury in Louisville decided not to charge officers with killing Breonna Taylor.

Los Angeles Lakers star LeBron James said on Twitter, “I’ve been lost for words today!”

“I’m devastated, hurt, sad, mad! We want Justice for Breonna yet justice was met for her neighbors apartment walls and not her beautiful life. Was I surprised at the verdict. Absolutely not but damnit I was & still am hurt and heavy hearted! I send my love to Breonna mother, family and friends! I’m sorry! I’m sorry! I’m sorry!!”

His Lakers teammate Danny Green said in a news conference that the decision was a “disappointment,” and that “our voices aren’t being heard loud enough.” But Green added that “we’re going to continue fighting, we’re going to continue to push, we’re going to continue to use our voices.”

WNBA player Kayla McBride, a guard on the Las Vegas Aces, said the news is “a tough pill to swallow, because it’s a large part of why we’re here.”

USWNT star Megan Rapinoe also wrote on Twitter, “My heart is with the family of Breonna Taylor right now. My god. This is devastating and unfortunately not surprising. Black and brown folx in this country deserve so much more.”

It's just past midnight on the East Coast. Here's a catch up on what's going on

It’s just past midnight Eastern Time, and protests are ongoing across the country after Wednesday’s indictment in the Breonna Taylor case. Here’s what you need to know:

The indictment: Only one of the three officers involved in Taylor’s death was indicted on first-degree wanton endangerment charges.

The other two officers who also fired shots during the botched March raid were not indicted, meaning no officer was charged with killing Taylor.

The public reaction: Demonstrators and activists immediately criticized the charges against the former detective, Brett Hankison.

Attorney Ben Crump, who represents Taylor’s family, called the indictment “outrageous and offensive.” The NAACP also said the justice system “failed” Taylor and the charges against one officer do “not go far enough.”

The protests: Protesters marched today in several US cities including New York, Chicago, Washington DC, Louisville, Nashville, Las Vegas, Atlanta and Philadelphia.

In some cities, the protests have escalated into clashes with law enforcement; two officers were shot in Louisville, and police fired tear gas at protesters in Atlanta.

Breonna Taylor's mother learned of indictment decision two minutes before AG's announcement

Breonna Taylor's mother Tamika Palmer listens during a press conference over the speed of the investigation of her daughter's death as attorney Benjamin Crump and co-counsel Lonita Baker address the media outside Louisville City Hall in Louisville, Kentucky, on August 13.

Breonna Taylor’s mother learned about the results of the grand jury indictment just two minutes before Attorney General Daniel Cameron made his announcement, even after It was expected the family would have a heads-up on the decision, family attorney Sam Aguiar told CNN.

“She had to drive all the way down there to be told this, despite two advanced requests from me to not force her to drive down only to learn no indictments,” Aguiar said. “I told them that would be hell for her.”  

CNN has reached out to the attorney general’s office for comment. 

Colin Kaepernick: "Abolish the police"

Quarterback and civil rights activist Colin Kaepernick tweeted his reaction to the Breonna Taylor indictment on Wednesday, saying, “The white supremacist institution of policing that stole Breonna Taylor’s life from us must be abolished for the safety and well being of our people.”

He included the hashtags “Breonna Taylor,” “Say Her Name,” and “Abolish The Police.”

A vehicle drove into a protest in Denver, one person detained 

The Denver Police Department said they are on the scene where a vehicle drove into a protest in the city’s downtown this evening.

The police department confirmed on Twitter that there were no injuries and one man has been detained. 

Atlanta police confirm "a number of arrests" at the protests

Atlanta police arrest protesters on Wednesday night.

Protesters took to the streets in downtown Atlanta, Georgia on Wednesday after news broke that no police officer had been charged with killing Breonna Taylor.

Several protesters have been arrested this evening, the police department said.

“We can confirm there have been a number of arrests made,” Atlanta Police spokeswoman Tasheena Brown told CNN.  

The police department will release the final tally of arrests on Thursday. 

Attorney Ben Crump says indictment is "like killing Breonna all over again"

Ben Crump, the attorney for Breonna Taylor’s family, told CNN tonight that the family is “outraged” by the grand jury’s decision not to charge the Louisville police officers with killing Taylor.

“It’s like killing Breonna all over again. Legalized genocide of people of color, because no matter how much evidence we have, they always find a way to try to legally justify it,” Crump said. “The DA can indict a ham sandwich if they want to … We strongly feel they did not want an indictment against these police officers.”

“We stand here today to say that there is no justification for the murder of Breonna Taylor. And we will go to our graves proclaiming that Breonna Taylor did not get justice from the Kentucky attorney general’s office.”

Grand jury’s decision: One of the three officers involved in Taylor’s case was indicted on first-degree wanton endangerment charges. The two other officers will face no charges following months of demonstrations and unrest over the killing.

At least 46 arrests made at Louisville protests

Police in Louisville, Kentucky, have made up to 46 arrests today as protesters took to the downtown streets, according to Louisville Police Sgt. Lamont Washington.

Protests turned chaotic earlier tonight, with two police officers shot. Neither have life-threatening injuries, and are receiving treatment, police said. One suspect is in custody.

A 72-hour curfew went into effect in Louisville at 9 p.m. ET.

What the Breonna Taylor protests look like in New York tonight

Members of Black Lives Matters (BLM) are joined by hundreds of others during an evening protest following the grand jury decision in the Breonna Taylor case outside of the Barclays Center on September 23 in Brooklyn.

Hundreds of protesters are still out in New York, heading back from Manhattan to Brooklyn across the Williamsburg Bridge.

The crowd gathered earlier in the day in Brooklyn at the Barclays Center, before crossing the Manhattan Bridge into the East Village.

“We’re talking about hundreds and hundreds, if not more than 1,000 or so, people out in the streets. It’s a festive atmosphere. There has been drumming, there’s a trumpet player. A guy on roller skates with a guitar. So it’s a festive atmosphere – but they are still angry, I should say … very, very angry about the results of this case.

Kentucky governor urges protesters to go home, doesn't want to see any more violence tonight

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear urged protesters to go home tonight, after two police officers were shot in Louisville, the city where Breonna Taylor was killed.

“There will be many times over the coming days where there will be an opportunity to be heard and so many people are listening right now. As your governor, I’ve promised to listen.”

Beshear added that he is thinking about the two injured officers and their family.

“But let’s make sure we don’t see any more violence tonight, and let’s make sure that we find ways of expressing ourselves moving forward where your point and other people’s points are made and that hopefully we can not just listen, but we can hear,” he said, urging people to “stay safe.”

Protests are erupting in multiple cities as night falls

Protesters react to gunfire on Wednesday night in Louisville, Kentucky.

As night falls, large protests are taking place in several major US cities following the grand jury indictment in the Breonna Taylor case.

In Louisville, Kentucky, where Taylor was killed, two police officers have been shot during the protests. Crowds are still out despite a 72-hour curfew that went into effect at 9 p.m. ET. Some 500 members of the Kentucky National Guard were deployed earlier in the day, and a heavy police presence was deployed downtown to clear the streets during curfew.

Members of Black Lives Matters (BLM) are joined by hundreds of others during an evening protest against the Kentucky grand jury decision in the Breonna Taylor case outside of the Barclays Center on Wednesday night in Brooklyn.

In New York, several hundred protesters are assembled in Manhattan. They started gathering hours ago in Brooklyn near the Barclays Center, before marching across the Manhattan Bridge into the East Village. Protesters on the street are diverse, including parents and families earlier in the evening.

One protester on a bicycle was struck by a pickup truck upstate in Buffalo, New York, earlier tonight. The bicyclist has non-life threatening injuries, police said.

In Atlanta, protests stayed peaceful for hours, with hundreds of protesters marching through the city’s downtown. But things heated up later in the evening, with the Georgia State Patrol deploying tear gas against the protesters.

Other cities with protests include Nashville, Tennessee; Columbus, Ohio; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; St. Paul, Minnesota; Washington, DC; and Chicago, Illinois.

Louisville police confirm two officers shot, one suspect in custody

Louisville Metro Police Department Interim Police Chief Robert Schroeder speaks to the media as he confirms two officers have been shot, after protesters clashed with police in Louisville, Kentucky, on September 23.

Two officers with the Louisville Metro Police Department were shot Wednesday night during protests of the Breonna Taylor case, the interim chief of the Louisville Police Department confirmed in a press briefing.

Interim Police Chief Robert Schroeder told reporters that one officer is in surgery, and both are in stable condition. A suspect is in custody, according to Schroeder.

“I am very concerned about the safety of our officers,” Schroeder said.

Schroeder said that around 8:30 p.m. ET, officers had been deployed downtown after shots were fired in a crowded area.

“We have had two officers shot tonight and it’s very serious. It’s a dangerous condition. I think the safety of the officers and community we serve is utmost importance,” he added.

The names of the officers were not released.