Black Lives Matter movement

By Melissa Macaya, Meg Wagner, Mike Hayes, Julia Hollingsworth and Adam Renton, CNN

Updated 9:55 PM ET, Wed June 24, 2020
26 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
12:56 p.m. ET, June 24, 2020

Atlanta Wendy's arson suspect appears in court

From CNN's John Murgatroyd

Natalie White made her first appearance in Fulton County, Georgia Magistrate Court Wednesday on arson charges related to the Wendy's fire that took place during protests in Atlanta.

The judge set bond at $10,000 and ordered White to remain under house arrest with an ankle monitor. The judge also said White must stay off of social media. 

White's attorney, Drew Findling, virtually argued for a signature bond from his office, citing financial hardships with White's family. "They just don't have the funds to make any bond," Findling said. He also argued against house arrest. 

Findling said he's known White since she was a child and indicated that White's mom, sister and godmother where sitting behind him.   

White is charged with first-degree arson for the fire that took place at the Wendy's as protests escalated last week after the shooting death of Rayshard Brooks. 

12:27 p.m. ET, June 24, 2020

Senate holds procedural vote on GOP policing reform bill

From CNN's Clare Foran, Manu Raju, Lauren Fox and Ted Barrett

Senate TV
Senate TV

The Senate is now holding a procedural vote on the GOP policing reform proposal, a vote that Democrats are expected to block after criticizing the measure as an inadequate response to nationwide calls for action to address police misconduct and racial injustice.

Senate Democrats are expected to deny Republicans the 60 votes needed on the procedural vote to begin debate on the bill, which is led Tim Scott, the only Black Republican senator.

It is unclear how long the vote will take.

10:48 a.m. ET, June 24, 2020

Bubba Wallace tells fans, “We’ll conquer the good fight”

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

Driver Bubba Wallace takes a selfie with himself and other drivers that pushed his car to the front in the pits of the Talladega Superspeedway prior to the start of the NASCAR Cup Series auto race at the Talladega Superspeedway in Talladega Alabama, on Monday, June 22.
Driver Bubba Wallace takes a selfie with himself and other drivers that pushed his car to the front in the pits of the Talladega Superspeedway prior to the start of the NASCAR Cup Series auto race at the Talladega Superspeedway in Talladega Alabama, on Monday, June 22. John Bazemore/AP

NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace says he is “relieved” after the FBI announced that the noose found hanging in his garage had been there since last October, ruling out that he was the victim of a hate crime.

In a message to his fans, he said he will continue to raise their voices because there’s a lot of work left to be done.

“I will continue to praise you and uplift you guys in the ways you have supported me, and I appreciate that from the bottom of my heart,” he said. “There’s a lot of work to be done that’s left on the table. We’ll walk hand in hand together, and conquer the good fight.”

He detailed how he found out about the noose hanging in his garage, saying the President of NASCAR, Steve Phelps, gave him the news on Sunday evening, and it was “one of the most difficult conversations, I believe, [Phelps had] ever had to have, tears flowing down his face and choked up on every word.”

Wallace added that by the time he got the news, the investigations were already underway.

“Then I got a call Monday morning in Talladega that the FBI was involved. So I'm just like, ‘OK, I'll just sit back and wait to see what we have to do.'”

Last night, he told CNN's Don Lemon that he's "pissed" members of the public are now questioning his integrity.

"I'm mad because people are trying to test my character and the person that I am and my integrity."

10:46 a.m. ET, June 24, 2020

McConnell noncommittal on bringing back police reform if Democrats block bill

From CNN's Ali Zaslav and Manu Raju

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks to members of the media after the weekly Senate Republican Policy Luncheon at Hart Senate Office Building June 23, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks to members of the media after the weekly Senate Republican Policy Luncheon at Hart Senate Office Building June 23, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Alex Wong/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was noncommittal about bringing police reform back if Democrats block the Republican policing bill.

“Well, we will let you know,” McConnell said Wednesday ahead of the GOP policing bill procedural vote that is expected to fail. “It can be done under a motion to reconsider at any point.”

Some context: Democrats made clear on Tuesday that they plan to deny Senate Republicans the 60-votes needed on a procedural vote to begin debate on the bill, which was led by Tim Scott, the only Black Republican senator.

If the vote fails, as it is expected to, lawmakers will not be able to open debate, offer amendments, or move to a final vote on passage.

"The Republican bill, as is, will not get 60 votes. There's overwhelming opposition to the bill in our caucus," Senate Democratic Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said on Tuesday, adding, "The Republican majority has given the Senate a bad bill and proposed no credible way to sufficiently improve it."

9:49 a.m. ET, June 24, 2020

Ex-officer who fatally shot Rayshard Brooks scheduled for bond hearing next week

From CNN's Erica Henry

Former Atlanta police officer Garrett Rolfe.
Former Atlanta police officer Garrett Rolfe. Fulton County Sheriff's Office

Garrett Rolfe, the former Atlanta police officer accused of fatally shooting Rayshard Brooks, is scheduled for a June 30 bond hearing at 2:00 pm ET, the Fulton County Clerk’s officer tells CNN.

Rolfe is facing felony murder and other charges for shooting and killing Brooks outside an Atlanta fast-food restaurant nearly two weeks ago.

9:41 a.m. ET, June 24, 2020

National Guard to provide unarmed security for monuments in DC

From CNN's Ryan Browne and Barbara Starr

US Park Police keep protesters back after they attempted to pull down the statue of Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square near the White House on June 22.
US Park Police keep protesters back after they attempted to pull down the statue of Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square near the White House on June 22. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The DC National Guard will provide unarmed guard members to assist with additional security for monuments in Washington, DC, the National Guard Bureau said Wednesday.

“The District of Columbia National Guard is responding to a request to support law enforcement officials and has dispatched unarmed personnel, with others on stand-by," National Guard spokesman Major Robert Perino said in a statement to CNN. “Activated guardsmen are expected to provide security for local monuments and critical infrastructure.”

A defense official says Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy signed the memo Tuesday authorizing the activation of the DC National Guard forces, after the National Park Police made a request for the assistance. 

The official strongly emphasized that no National Guard forces have yet been sent onto the streets and so far have all stayed inside their barracks.

There are about 100 troops now in the immediate Washington DC area. The activation could grow to 400 total in order to have enough to rotate troops if that is needed.

The Pentagon expects the guard forces to be used as a stopgap measure until the Justice Department can muster additional federal law enforcement personnel to take over the mission, the defense official said. Nonetheless its expected the guard units will remain in the DC area through July 4.

Some more context: Speaking to reporters Tuesday morning, President Trump said he would sign an executive order punishing those who desecrate monuments to US veterans, though he acknowledged that federal law already prohibits such vandalism with up to 10 years of prison time

On Tuesday, Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt, appearing on Fox News, said he asked DOD to make National Guard “available” to them if needed to protect monuments.

On Tuesday, law enforcement cleared streets at the Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, DC, removing several tents near the White House in which protesters were encamped and leading to a tense confrontation between police and demonstrators.

9:23 a.m. ET, June 24, 2020

Officers involved in Floyd's death were trained to prevent suffocation, Minneapolis police chief confirms

From CNN's Brad Parks

Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao.
Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao. Hennepin County Sheriff's Office via AP

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo said in a statement Tuesday that the death of George Floyd was “murder” and that the officer who was seen pressing his knee into Floyd’s neck “knew what he was doing” because he had taken specific training on preventing “positional asphyxiation,” or suffocation. 

“Mr. George Floyd’s tragic death was not due to a lack of training — the training was there. Chauvin knew what he was doing,” Arradondo said. “The officers knew what was happening — one intentionally caused it and the others failed to prevent it. This was murder — it wasn’t a lack of training."

Derek Chauvin and Tou Thao, two of the officers involved in killing George Floyd, both received department training on preventing “positional asphyxiation,” or suffocation, in people being restrained in a prone position or face down, the Minneapolis Police Department confirmed to CNN Wednesday. 

Arradondo released the statement late Tuesday night in response to training records questions and a data request from the Star Tribune about whether the Minneapolis Police Department fulfilled a promise in a 2013 settlement to require all sworn officers to undergo training on the dangers of positional asphyxiation.  

Arradondo said in the statement that the Minneapolis Police Department “went beyond the requirements” of the settlement.

It not only provided the training, but changed its policies in June 2014 to “explicitly require moving an arrestee from a prone position to a recovery position when the maximal restraint technique is used and require continuous monitoring of an arrestee’s condition.”

CNN has reached out to the attorneys for former officers Chauvin, Thao, and Thomas Lane for comment. The attorney for former officer J. Alexander Kueng declined to comment Wednesday morning.  

8:53 a.m. ET, June 24, 2020

GOP lawmaker plans to block effort to ban confederate names on military properties

From CNN's Manu Raju,Ted Barrett and Phil Mattingly

Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO) asks a question during a Judiciary Committee hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on June 16, 2020 in Washington, D.C.
Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO) asks a question during a Judiciary Committee hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on June 16, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images

Sen. Josh Hawley, a Republican from Missouri, will introduce an amendment to block an effort by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, to mandate that the Department of Defense rename military bases named after Confederate soldiers.

Hawley's amendment instead "tasks a Commission to hold public hearings, gather input from military families and veterans, and work with state and local communities to recommend a way forward."

Some background: A Senate plan to remove names of Confederate leaders on military assets has sharply divided Republicans — and has now put a GOP-led panel at odds with the White House at a time of a wide-ranging re-examination of race in the United States.

The amendment, offered by Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren, calls for the removal of names of Confederate leaders from all military assets —whether it's a base, installation, facility, aircraft, ship, plane or type of equipment — within three years.

The plan was adopted behind closed doors by voice vote with the support of some Republicans, even as President Donald Trump condemned any action to remove Confederate leaders' names from military bases — and the White House vowed to veto any such legislative effort.

8:03 a.m. ET, June 24, 2020

It's just past 8 a.m. in New York and 5 a.m. in San Francisco. Here's the latest on the protests

Demonstrators are blocked by a police line on 16th Street in front of the White House, as protests triggered by the death of George Floyd continue on June 23.
Demonstrators are blocked by a police line on 16th Street in front of the White House, as protests triggered by the death of George Floyd continue on June 23. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

A wave of protests against police brutality and institutional racism has swept the US and the world following the death of George Floyd in police custody. Here's what you need to know today:

Protesters tear down statues as clashes erupt in Wisconsin: Protesters took to the streets of Madison, Wisconsin, to express their frustration over the arrest of a Black demonstrator. The protesters tore down two statues. During demonstrations overnight, a state senator was also attacked.

Senate Democrats set to block GOP police reform: The Republican policing reform measure is on the verge of collapse in the Senate with Democrats lining up to block it after criticizing the legislation as an inadequate response to calls for police reform.

Charleston removes statue of John C. Calhoun: Crews in Charleston, South Carolina, began the process of removing a statue of the slavery defender and former vice president in the early hours of Wednesday morning, according to a tweet from the local police department.

Black Lives Matter protests have not led to a spike in coronavirus cases: A new study, published this month by the National Bureau of Economic Research, suggests that despite warnings from public health officials, the demonstrations did not lead to an increase in cases.