June 22 Black Lives Matter protests

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9:09 p.m. ET, June 22, 2020

Press told to leave White House grounds amid protests

CNN
CNN

In an unusual move, CNN’s team at the White House, along with other members of the White House press corps, have been told by the US Secret Service to immediately leave the White House grounds.

The move comes during an ongoing situation in Lafayette Park in front of the White House, where protesters have been trying to bring down the statue of former President Andrew Jackson.

Those protesters have now been pushed back out of the park by police.

"Protesters put ropes around a statue of Andrew Jackson in the park, they were trying to topple that statue and very quickly you saw police push those protesters back," CNN's White House Correspondent Kaitlan Collins said from in front of the White House.

Watch:

8:34 p.m. ET, June 22, 2020

Seattle police will return to precinct emptied during protests

From CNN’s Andy Rose

The vacated Seattle Police Department's East Precinct is seen in the area known as the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone on June 12 in Seattle, Washington.
The vacated Seattle Police Department's East Precinct is seen in the area known as the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone on June 12 in Seattle, Washington. Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images

The Seattle Police Department will be returning to the East Precinct, which was boarded up and abandoned after protesters established an “autonomous zone” outside the building.

Mayor Jenny Durkan, speaking at a news conference Monday evening, did not give an exact deadline for officers to return. 

Three people were shot in the Capitol Hill Organized Protest area over the weekend, said Police Chief Carmen Best, including a 19-year-old man who was killed. "It is not unnoticed that the victims were Black men,” Durkan said.

Best said officers who responded to the most recent shooting were met by a “hostile crowd” who prevented first responders from quickly reaching the victims. Best said there have also been reports of rape, arson and property destruction in the zone.

“We cannot walk away from the truth of what is happening here,” Best said. “This is about life or death.”

The police chief strongly criticized City Council's decision to prevent officers from using crowd control weapons like tear gas.

“A life might have been saved if not for the circumstances created by hasty legislation,” Best said.

8:31 p.m. ET, June 22, 2020

"All in all, we won today," says Bubba Wallace following show of support at NASCAR race

From CNN's Jill Martin

Bubba Wallace takes a selfie of himself and other drivers that pushed his car to the front in the pits of the Talladega Superspeedway prior to the start of the NASCAR Cup Series race on June 22 in Talladega, Alabama.
Bubba Wallace takes a selfie of himself and other drivers that pushed his car to the front in the pits of the Talladega Superspeedway prior to the start of the NASCAR Cup Series race on June 22 in Talladega, Alabama. John Bazemore/AP

Following Monday’s race at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama, Bubba Wallace approached the stands and gave high-fives to fans — some wearing Black Lives Matter shirts — after his performance.

"This is probably the most badass moment right here," he told FOX Sports.

Wallace also later went on to say: "This sport is changing. The deal that happened yesterday — sorry I’m not wearing my mask, but I wanted to show whoever it was that you're not going to take away my smile. I’m going to keep on going.”

Wallace at one point led the field but was running low on fuel late, ultimately finishing 14th.

"Man, I know I should've won that damn race,” Wallace said. “We ran out of gas. Just the stars didn't align for us completely. All in all, we won today. The pre-race deal was probably one of the hardest things I've ever had to witness in my life. ... This is truly incredible, and I'm proud be a part of this sport."

What happened before the race: NASCAR drivers, pit crew members and others walked alongside Wallace and escorted his Number 43 car in a show of support at the Talladega Superspeedway a day after a noose was found in his garage.

The discovery of the noose Sunday afternoon in Wallace's garage stall comes as the United States, and NASCAR in particular, more squarely address America's systemic racism in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd.

Wallace, the only Black driver in NASCAR's top circuit, has been an outspoken advocate of the Black Lives Matter movement and the corresponding protests against racism and police brutality. He wore an "I Can't Breathe" shirt before one event, repainted his car with the "Black Lives Matter" phrase and pushed NASCAR to ban the Confederate flag.

8:16 p.m. ET, June 22, 2020

Mourners pay their respects to Rayshard Brooks at public viewing

Rev. Raphael G. Warnock comforts Tomika Miller, the wife of Rayshard Brooks, during Brooks'  public viewing at Ebenezer Baptist Church on Monday, June 22 in Atlanta.
Rev. Raphael G. Warnock comforts Tomika Miller, the wife of Rayshard Brooks, during Brooks' public viewing at Ebenezer Baptist Church on Monday, June 22 in Atlanta. Curtis Compton/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP

Mourners attended a public viewing today for Rayshard Brooks, who was shot and killed on June 12 by an Atlanta police officer.

His casket departed following the viewing at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta.

His private funeral service will be held Tuesday at 1 p.m. ET at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Martin Luther King Jr. served as a co-pastor from 1960 until his assassination in 1968.

About the service: King's daughter, the Rev. Bernice A. King, will speak at Brooks' funeral. Rev. Raphael G. Warnock, the senior pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church and a Democratic candidate for US Senate, will provide the eulogy.

Tyler Perry has offered to pay for the funeral arrangements, according to Brooks' family attorney Chris Stewart and a news release. Gospel singers Smokie Norful, Tamela Mann and Kurt Carr are expected to perform at Tuesday's service.

Hear more:

7:14 p.m. ET, June 22, 2020

Senate Democrats signal they're prepared to block GOP police reform bill on Wednesday

From CNN's Manu Raju and Ted Barrett

Democratic senators on Monday gave their strongest indications yet they may block the GOP's police reform bill from coming to the floor, a risky move that could prevent any overhaul measure from being enacted this year over their party's concerns that the GOP bill is far too weak. 

Democrats are demanding clear commitments from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell that they will be able to vote on amendments on the floor. But McConnell has so far said he'd be willing to have an "open" process on the floor but has not specified which amendments would be considered. Democrats are expected to continue to discuss their strategy on Tuesday.

After a Monday afternoon caucus call, Senate Democrats were downbeat about the prospects of the path forward on the bill offered by GOP Sen. Tim Scott, saying far more needs to be changed and contending McConnell had failed to commit to allowing votes on amendments on the floor. Many expected the bill to be blocked since Republicans need at least seven Democratic votes to break a filibuster. 

Sen. Mazie Hirono, a Hawaii Democrat, said Scott’s bill "doesn’t do what we should be doing which is doing honest police reform."

"The time to talk is before the bill hits the floor … if you really want to do serious work on a serious matter, you ought to be having discussions right now," she said.

Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin declined to discuss his party's strategy, but he pointed to the Democrats' decision to block McConnell's initial $2 trillion stimulus plan in March. Afterwards, the two sides cut a deal that Democrats got behind after changes were made to the historic rescue package.

"We faced similar offers in the past — on the CARES Act — and I think the best thing that happened is we didn't accept his offer and demanded a bipartisan approach to it," Durbin said. 

Moreover, key groups also began to urge their opposition to the plan, including the influential NAACP, which urged senators to block the bill on Wednesday's procedural vote.

Also on Monday, both Rev. Al Sharpton and Benjamin Crump — the attorney representing the family of George Floyd, the unarmed black man who was killed while in Minneapolis custody when an officer knelt on his neck — announced their opposition to the Scott plan. 

"The Black Community is tired of the lip service and is shocked that this $7 billion package can be thought of as legislation," Crump said. 

Many Democrats would not say if they would vote against proceeding to the bill, even as they were uncertain how they would get to a "yes" vote on Wednesday.

  • New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, a lead author of the Democrats' bill, would not say Monday if he would vote to advance the Scott bill. “We’re having a lot of conversation," Booker said. "I think there are a lot of things right now that show that the process we are headed towards is just not a good process …The House went through a process. They went through committee they did a lot of things. It was a normal, regular order process. This is not that. We’re having a lot of conversations about that now and we’ll see where it ends up.”
  • Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut added: "There has been no outreach from McConnell."
  • Sen. Bob Menendez, a New Jersey Democrat, was sharply critical of the Scott bill, called the Justice Act. “Where is the justice in the Justice Act?" he said. Asked if Democrats could change it on the floor to their liking, Menendez said: “If you got commitments up front. There are none.”

One Democrat in a difficult reelection, Sen. Doug Jones of Alabama, said he is inclined to vote to proceed to the bill. But when asked about a lack of progress in talks with McConnell, Jones said: "There never is. We’ll see where it goes.” 

Sen. Joe Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat and swing vote, said: "I have no idea (how I will vote.) Everything is still open.”

6:18 p.m. ET, June 22, 2020

City of Compton demands answers over death of Andres Guardado

From CNN's Sarah Moon

People leave candles and other items at a makeshift memorial for Andres Guardado on June 21 in Gardena, California.
People leave candles and other items at a makeshift memorial for Andres Guardado on June 21 in Gardena, California. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

The city of Compton is demanding answers over the death of Andres Guardado, the 18-year-old man who was fatally shot by a sheriff’s deputy in Los Angeles County.

“The only acceptable reaction to the murder of Andres Guardado is immediate action by all responsible parties. People are hurting and they are tired of excuses. I strongly urge the LA County Sheriff's Department to address this incident immediately and provide answers for the family and our community,” the city of Compton said.

Sunday’s march from Gardena to Compton to protest the shooting of Guardado ended in a clash between police officers and protesters.

Protesters were tear gassed and struck with rubber bullets, according to organizers of the march.

7:22 p.m. ET, June 22, 2020

"None of us are safe until all of us are safe," says reverend at Rayshard Brooks visitation

Rev. Raphael Warnock, speaks at Ebenezer Baptist Church on June 22 in Atlanta.
Rev. Raphael Warnock, speaks at Ebenezer Baptist Church on June 22 in Atlanta. CNN

Rev. Raphael Warnock, the senior pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, told reporters at today's public visitation for Rayshard Brooks that "none of us are safe until all of us are safe."

"Tragically, we’ve been here before. Someone asked me last week, what was it like to preach the Sunday after the death of George Floyd. My answer then and my answer now is it’s sort of like it was the Sunday after I preached following the death of Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery. Sadly, we’ve had a lot of practice with this kind of thing," he said.

He added: "I’m very hopeful though. Because there is this multiracial coalition of conscious pouring out into American streets saying that we’ve got to address this age old virus of racism that we are one people and that in a real sense, none of us are safe until all of us are safe. Your children are not well unless my children are well."

Brooks was shot and killed on June 12 by an Atlanta police officer.

His funeral will be held on Tuesday at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Warnock will provide the eulogy.

9:35 p.m. ET, June 22, 2020

Here's the latest on the Black Lives Matter protests

It's 5:30 p.m. in New York, and 2:30 p.m. out West.

It has been nearly a month since George Floyd's death in Minneapolis, which sparked the ongoing Black Lives Matter demonstrations across the US and around the world. Here's a look at the latest headlines:

  • NASCAR drivers offer Bubba Wallace show of support after noose found in his garage: A noose was found in Wallace's garage stall on Sunday, the auto racing company said. In a statement, Wallace, the only Black NASCAR racer, called it a "despicable act of racism and hatred." NASCAR drivers, pit crew members and others walked alongside Wallace and escorted his Number 43 car in a show of support at the Talladega Superspeedway on Monday.
  • Passengers alleging racial discrimination sue American Airlines over Black man's removal from flight: American Airlines is being sued by five passengers who allege they were improperly removed from a flight because of racial discrimination by the airline. American says it is investigating the incident but at this point it believes the allegations in the federal lawsuit are inaccurate.
  • NYPD officer suspended: A New York City police officer has been suspended without pay after he was captured on video in what the police commissioner called a "disturbing apparent chokehold incident." An internal police investigation is ongoing.
  • Rayshard Brooks' funeral: Brooks was the 27-year-old father shot and killed by Atlanta police. His funeral will take place on Tuesday at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, where Martin Luther King Jr. served as a co-pastor and where King's funeral service was held.

This post was updated to accurately reflect the circumstances surrounding Brooks' death.

4:47 p.m. ET, June 22, 2020

English Premier League team condemns "White lives matter" banner flown over soccer match

From CNN's Kevin Dotson and David Williams

A plane flies over Etihad Stadium with a banner reading 'White Lives Matter Burnley' prior to the match between Manchester City and Burnley FC on June 22 in Manchester, England.
A plane flies over Etihad Stadium with a banner reading 'White Lives Matter Burnley' prior to the match between Manchester City and Burnley FC on June 22 in Manchester, England. Shaun Botterill/Getty Images

The English Premier League club Burnley released a statement condemning a banner reading "WHITE LIVES MATTER BURNLEY" that was seen flying over Etihad Stadium in Manchester, England, ahead of the team's match against Manchester City.

"We wish to make it clear that those responsible are not welcome at Turf Moor," the statement said. "This, in no way, represents what Burnley Football Club stands for and we will work fully with the authorities to identify those responsible and issue lifetime bans."

Emmett Harper, who lives in a flat near Manchester’s Etihad Stadium where Manchester City is playing Burnley, told CNN he saw a plane flying over the city pulling a banner that said “White Lives Matter Burnley."

Harper said he saw the plane flying over the stadium just before the game for about 10 minutes.

Players for both teams are wearing "BLACK LIVES MATTER" on the back of their jerseys.

Here's Harpers' tweet: