All 3 men guilty of murder in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery

By Mike Hayes, Aditi Sangal, Adrienne Vogt, Meg Wagner, Melissa Mahtani and Fernando Alfonso III, CNN

Updated 10:30 PM ET, Wed November 24, 2021
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1:59 p.m. ET, November 24, 2021

Judge orders convicted Arbery murderers to remain in sheriff's custody

From CNN's Mike Hayes

After excusing the jury, the judge told Travis McMichael, Gregory McMichael, William "Roddie" Bryan and their attorneys, that he would follow up with them in the coming weeks about a sentencing date.

The judge then ordered that the three men convicted of murdering Ahmaud Arbery remain in the custody of the sheriff.

1:48 p.m. ET, November 24, 2021

Judge polls each juror on the verdict after it was read

(Pool)
(Pool)

Following the reading of the verdicts, Judge Timothy Walmsley polled the jury to confirm that what was read in court was accurate. All the jurors answered yes.

The judge thanked the jurors and excused them from the courtroom.

1:44 p.m. ET, November 24, 2021

William "Roddie" Bryan Jr. found guilty of murder in the death of Ahmaud Arbery 

From CNN’s Alta Spells and Devon M. Sayers 

(Pool)
(Pool)

William “Roddie” Bryan Jr., one of three men, accused of killing 25-year-old Ahmaud Arbery, has been found guilty of felony murder.  

Bryan now faces a maximum sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole.  

Jurors convicted him of felony murder but acquitted him of the malice murder charge. 

Bryan has also been indicted on separate federal hate crime charges, which include interference with rights and attempted kidnapping. Bryan pleaded not guilty to the federal charges.  

The federal trial is set to take place in February. Since he was being held on the state charges, there has been no federal bond hearing yet. If convicted on the federal charges, he could face an additional penalty of up to life in prison. 

1:43 p.m. ET, November 24, 2021

Gregory McMichael found guilty of murder in the death of Ahmaud Arbery 

From CNN’s Alta Spells and Devon M. Sayers 

(Pool)
(Pool)

Gregory McMichael, one of three men, accused of killing 25-year-old Ahmaud Arbery, has been found guilty of felony murder.  

McMichael now faces a maximum sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole.  

He has also been indicted on three separate federal hate crime charges, which include interference with rights, attempted kidnapping and using, carrying, brandishing, and discharging a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence. McMichael pleaded not guilty to the federal charges. 

The federal trial is set to take place in February. Since he was being held on the state charges, there has been no federal bond hearing yet. If convicted on the federal charges, he could face an additional penalty of up to life in prison. 

1:49 p.m. ET, November 24, 2021

Travis McMichael guilty of murder in Ahmaud Arbery's death

(Pool)
(Pool)

The man who shot and killed Ahmaud Arbery has been found guilty on all nine charges in the jogger’s death. 

A jury found Travis McMichael guilty of malice murder, four counts of felony murder, two counts of aggravated assault, false imprisonment and criminal attempt to commit a felony. 

McMichael was one of three defendants in the case, including his father, Gregory McMichael and their neighbor William "Roddie" Bryan. The men were charged with chasing and killing 25-year-old Arbery as he jogged through the Satilla Shores neighborhood near Brunswick, Georgia on Feb. 23, 2020.     

McMichael now faces a minimum sentence of life in prison on the murder charges. Prosecutors have indicated that they will seek a sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole. The judge will decide whether his sentences will be served consecutively or concurrently.  

In addition to the state charges, Travis McMichael was also indicted on three separate federal hate crime charges, including interference with rights, attempted kidnapping and using, carrying, brandishing, and discharging a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence. McMichael pleaded not guilty to the federal charges.  

The federal trial is set to take place in February. Since he was being held on the state charges, a federal bond hearing has not yet been held. If convicted on the federal charges, he could face an additional sentence of up to life in prison. 

1:37 p.m. ET, November 24, 2021

The verdict is being read for men charged in Ahmaud Arbery's death

The three White defendants, Gregory McMichael, Travis McMichael and William "Roddie" Bryan Jr., are each facing five murder charges in the 2020 death of Black jogger Ahmaud Arbery.

The 25-year-old Black man was jogging in Brunswick, Georgia, when he was fatally shot in 2020.

The verdict is being read in court now.

1:30 p.m. ET, November 24, 2021

The jury has reached a verdict in the trial of 3 men charged in Ahmaud Arbery's killing 

Left to right: Travis McMichael, William "Roddie" Bryan and Gregory McMichael
Left to right: Travis McMichael, William "Roddie" Bryan and Gregory McMichael Getty Images

A jury has reached a verdict in the trial of three men charged in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man, as he jogged last year through a Glynn County, Georgia, neighborhood.

The jury reached a verdict at 1:21 p.m. The verdict will be read soon in court. 

11:40 a.m. ET, November 24, 2021

The jury has been deliberating for about 3 hours today

The jury in the trial of three men accused of killing Ahmaud Arbery started a second day of deliberations around 8:30 a.m. ET. That means they're on their third hour of deliberations today now.

The jurors spent just over six hours deliberating yesterday, beginning at 11:53 a.m. ET and ending around 6:20 p.m. ET.

The jury — which consists of one Black member and 11 White members — is considering charges for Travis McMichael, Gregory McMichael and William "Roddie" Bryan Jr., the three men accused in the 2020 shooting.

Arbery's death sparked national outrage after a video of his shooting was made public: The 25-year-old Black man was jogging in Brunswick, Georgia, when he was fatally shot.

10:15 a.m. ET, November 24, 2021

Here's how you can support Black mental health amid images of graphic violence

From CNN's Ashley Vaughan

The jury asked to re-watch the graphic videos that show Ahmaud Arbery being shot as they continue deliberations, and for many African Americans, the trial churns up a chronic trauma: replayed footage of Black men killed by law enforcement (or those claiming to act on law enforcement's behalf).

While evidence and testimony from recent trials is distressing for most people, it is overwhelming for African Americans — and especially excruciating for Black men who see their very humanity reflected in each case.

With each killing of a Black person captured on screen, African Americans are fighting harder than ever to protect and prioritize their mental health.

And Black men and women are exhausted.

Here are some ways to support Black mental health amid images of racial violence:

  • Acknowledge your feelings: Paul Bashea Williams, lead clinician and owner of Hearts in Mind Counseling in Maryland's Prince George and Montgomery counties, suggests taking a moment to be present with yourself and to name the feelings and experiences you may be having. The answer to that question may be fatigue, headaches, feelings of helplessness and hopelessness, irritability and anxiety. Emotional and physiological responses can be helpful gauges of knowing when enough is enough.
  • Create community: A trusted support team is helpful in gently identifying changes you may not readily see in your mood or behavior. The therapist is clear that one's self-care community must be grounded in relationships they can trust.
  • Prioritize self-care with boundaries: Williams said this is about finding ways to care for mental health in the person's everyday life. One way to do this individually is to take an internal inventory of moments when you historically experienced joy and think about things that you like. The next step is to create boundaries to prioritize needs. For example, Williams says using the "do not disturb" option on a phone is one way of "putting the responsibility on the boundary."
  • Seek therapy: Williams recommends finding a therapist whom you trust and who fits with you. When seeking a clinician, he encourages individuals to try out therapists. He also recommends pushing back if you feel you aren't getting enough in sessions.

There are many organizations that provide support and resources to the Black community. Click here for a full list.